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Full text of "Kansas State collegian"

/^K A N S A S STATE 

Collegian 



www.kstatecollegian.coin 



Residence 

* 

hall rates 
increase 



By Hannah Sancton 
KANSAS SWTl COLLEGIAN 

Students living in residence halls 
will hive to pay a little more next year. 

They will pay 6.5 percent more than 
they do now, according to the Consent 
Agenda of Fiscal Affairs and Audit. The 
Association of Residence Halls voted 
to increase the overall room charge by 
about $370 per year. 

About 5 percent of the higher cost 
will cover increased expenses for sala- 
ries and benefits, food, utilities, main- 
tenance and other operating expendi- 
tures, according to the consent agenda. 
The other 15 percent will consolidate 
a mandatory user fee that supports net- 
work and computer lab infrastructure. 

Meal plans will increase by about $4 
per month, and apartment rent might 
increase by only $10 per month. 

"It is still cheaper than living off 
campus, so ! don't have a problem with 
it," Mike Harreld, sophomore in math, 
said 

Skyler Harper, assistant director of 
the Department of Housing and Din- 
ing Services, said the money generated 
by the increase, about $140,000, will 
be put into things students have re- 
quested, like new furniture, kitchenette 
and laundry improvements, and minor 
renovations in the Marlatt Hall lobby. 

Harper said he knew residents are 
afraid all funds will go to Jardine Apart 
ments, but he said both traditional resi- 
dence halls and Jardine will benefit. 

"The residence halls have been 
supplemented by revenue brought in 
by apartments in the past, so it will all 
even out," Harper said. 

Meredith Lindsey, freshman in the- 
ater and West Hall resident, said she 
wasn't pleased with the increase. 

"1 don't feel it's justified in the 
slightest," she said. "It's already difficult 
enough for students like me to pay for 
college without having to worry wheth- 
er or not they'll jack up prices." 

Sierra Wiegert, sophomore in com- 
puter science and Boyd Hall resident, 
said the increase is acceptable. 

"As long as the money is benefiting 
those living in the residence halls, the 
increase isn't that big of a deal," Wie- 
gart said. 

ARH was not available for comment 
at press time 



INSIDE 

Claire Cog^Jis' 
role changes from 
helper to leader 
this season. 




\ 



*Td£ # 



Friday, November 1 7, 2006 



Homewan 
bound 

Students must exercise cauifefi 

when driving in winter weather 



9 j ^^^^^■n wftRfw^f 
KANSAS SWtCOUKIAN 



The forecast for Thanksgiv- 
ing break is mild - mid-60s and 
cloudy, with no precipitation 
- but Kansas weather can turn at 
the drop of a hat. 

Students who face long drives 
on holiday breaks should take ex- 
tra care to prepare for the trip. 

Common -sense practices can 
make driving much safer. 

In icy or snowy weather, drivers 
should take precautions like leav- 
ing extra distance between their 
vehicle and the vehicles ahead, 
driving more slowly and acceler- 
ating and braking more slowly, ac- 
cording to the Kansas Department 
of Transportation Web site. 

At all times, drivers should 
wear a seatbelt and try to drive 
only in daylight After dusk and 
before dawn, visibility is lower, 
and deer are more likely to be on 
the roads. 

When she makes the three-hour 
drive home to Bellevue, Neb., on 
Tuesday, [ulia Paul, junior in ani- 
mal science, said she will make 
sure she has her cell phone 
with her Paul said her par- 
ents worry about her getting 
home safely. 

"They dont like me 
driving in the dark," Paul 
said. "I'm actually a AAA 
member because of that." 

Paul said she always is con- 
cerned about her car breaking 



down on the road, but she plans 
to be prepared as the weather 
gets colder. 

"I'll probably put some 
blankets In my car, just in 
case," she said. 

Jenny Glodowtki, junior in 
family studies and human ser- 
vices, said she also will put things 
like blankets and gloves in her car 
when she drives home to Schuy- 
ler, Neb., for Thanksgiving. 

"Having a cell phone doesn't 
help, because 1 don't always get 
service on the way home," the 
said "I will probably check ray oil 
and make sure my lights work, if 1 
was driving home at night." 

Glodowski said she nearly 
rolled her car when she was driv- 
ing home last year. 

"Everybody was going about 30 
miles an hour," she said. "I tried to 
pass them, and it was really slick 
on the other side of the road. I 
spun around like six times. Now 
I'll just follow the slow people and 
not try to pass them." 



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High school students occupy restaurant's smoking area in protest 

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Emily Barry, 1 7; Skytar Hum bo rd, 16; Jan«tl« Mclh/aln, senior in family science* 
and human services; and Races Graft 15, talk while participating in a sit-in smoking 
protest, "Operator* Sitting Duck,' Thursday evening at Buffalo Wild Wings. 



By Jonas Hogg 

KANSAS 51ATU0LU6IAN 

They came, they saw, they sat right 
down. 

Manhattan High School students, 
spearheaded by the group Teens 
Leading Teens, had their third-an- 
nual smoking crash, Operation Sitting 
Duck, Thursday night as blue-shirted 
students, parents and supporters in- 
vaded the designated smoking section 
of the Aggieville bar and grill Buffalo 
Wild Wings. 

The sit-in, which lasted from 7 to 9 
p.m., came one month after Manhattan 
city commissioners tossed a proposed 
smoking ban. However, the continua- 
tion of controversial anti-smoking poli- 
cies sprouting up across the nation is 



motivation for local supporters. 

For the last three years, Buffalo 
Wild Wings has been home to the 
event, which originated as a collabora- 
tion between a former manager and a 
former high school age employee, both 
of whom supported smoking legisla- 
tion. 

The event has continued despite 
the absence of the founders, and sev- 
eral employees grabbed T-shirts from 
students at the entrance to show their 
support for the cause 

Buffalo Wild Wings, either locally 
or as corporate policy, has not taken a 
stance on the issue. 

"I'm not for or against it," said man- 
ager Ami Walters, Manhattan resi- 
dent "If it happens, great If it doesn ' t, 
great" 



Employees of the restaurant are split 
in their support of smoking legislation, 
Walters said, and though the issue is a 
heavily contested one, there were no 
fears unpleasant encounters. 

"I think it's great that they're com- 
ing out and supporting something they 
feel strongly about," she said. 

While some might see the event as 
confrontational, Kari Quiton Beard, 
drug and alcohol prevention coordi- 
nator for USD 383, said the intended 
result is not conflict but education. 

"Education and awareness is one of 
our primary goals, and for us it's always 
been a health perspective." she said. 

Quiton Beard, who also sponsors 
Teens Leading Teens, said the group, 

SetSJMIEraftl 



) 



Today's forecast 

Sunny 
High: 60 low: 28 



INSIDE 



Soldiers honored in ceremony 

More than 1 50 Fort Riley soldiers received 
medals recognizing their service in Iraq during a 
ceremony in McCain Auditorium on Thursday. 
See story Pag* 3 



CAMPUS NEWS HIGHLIGHTS 



Education week 

As a part of International Educa- 
tion Week, Patricia Sole will '.peak 
on "Heuristics, Serendipity and 
Enlightened Opportunism" at 3*30 
p.m today in Seaton 132 The 
coffee hour series will feature the 
country Kyigyzstan at 4 p m today 
in the International Student Center, 
for a complete schedule, visit www 
^ff^,eoVo^rtm!V»TriWIM.nfrri 



Entomology seminar 

There wi be an entomology seminar 
at 1:30 pm today in Waters 129. 
William Lamp from the University of 
Maryland will speak about the po- 
tato kafhoppec and the persistence 
ol forage alfalfa. It will surnmarize 
Lamp's research on the potato 
leafhopper, empoasca fabae, and 
emphasize the response of alfalfa to 
injury and management 



Spring 2007 Collegian 

Megan Moser, senior in mass com- 
munications, was selected as the edi- 
tor in chief of the Cdktsan for spring 
2007. Courtney Slevpen. junior In 
irvass cwnmunicaticins, was named 
the ad manager for spring 2007 They 
wen? chosen by the Board of Student 
Publications after submitting dips, 
letters of reference, a cover letter and 
siterviewtng with the board. 



Republican leaders for 2008 

fMy&utMi and John McCain are virtual rM for the lead among 
rtassMoru. while ConcWeexz* Wee h<>l* cle* rjfc to a «su* ftW place 

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Page 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Friday, Nov. 17,200ft 



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ACERNIJC: " R M I C BLENK." 
Yesterday's Crvptequip; IF A BOAT IS 
TRANSPORTING THINGS SUCH AS GAS AND 
COAL. THAT COULD BE A SHIP OF FUELS. 
Today's Crypwqutp Clue: R equals P 



Pregnancy 
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P-333S 

iiika testing 
dentia] service 
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Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-S p.m. 



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BEST BETS 

Your social calendar for the weekend 



17 Friday 



OS. ©- Q« 




UPC After Hours 

7-11 p.m. Union Courtyard 

Come join the fun and play grocery 

bingo at this week's After Hours There 
will be a free breakfast bar for the first 
ISOr 



Feature Film: "Clerks 2" 

8 p.m. and I0:J0 p.m. Little Theatre' 
Admission: $1 

After the Quick Stop bums down, 
Dante and Randall get jobs at Mooby'v 
a Disney -McDonald's- style fast -food 
restaurant. It's directed by Kevin Smith, 



so expect crazy antics and the reappear 
anceofJayand Silent Bob 

'Movie also plays at 7 p.m. and 9:30 
p.m Saturday and 6 p.m. Sunday. Ad- 
mission for Saturday and Sunday is $2. 

Women's basketball game 

K- State vs. Wyoming 
7 p.m. Bramlage Coliseum 

The Wildcats take on the Cowboys 
tonight. K State leads the series 3-1, 
beating Wyoming last November in Lara- 
mie, Wyo. The Wildcats look to post a 3-D 
sort for the third season in a row. 



18 Saturday 




Men's basketball game 

K- Stale vs. Tennessee Tech 
8 p.m. Bramlage Coliseum 

After a victory in New Jersey against 
Rutgers, the Wildcat look to keep 
theit momentum against Tennessee 



Tech. There are ISO tickets left for 
the game. Tickets are Si S and will 
be on sale from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
today at the athletk ticket office in 
Bramlage. 

Football game 

K State at Kansas 

2:30 p.m. Memorial Stadium 

The Wildcats look to finish the season 
with a win at Lawrence that would put 
K-State at 8-4 in coach Ron Prince's 
first season. If you don't have tickets 
io the game, you can always go and 
watch it for tree on the hill overlook- 
ing Memorial Stadium, or you can 
watch it on Fox Sports Network. 



19 Sunday 



Rest and relaxation 

Take the day off and relax or 
finish up the homework due 
before Thanksgiving break 
We only have two more days 
before this much needed vaca 
lion, so pamper yourself. 




The planner 

Campus bulletin board 



The planner is the Collegian's campus bulletin board service. Items 
in the calendar can be published up to three rimes, hems might not 
appear because of space constraints but are guaranteed to appear 
on the day of the activity. To place an item in the Campus Calendar, 
stop by Kedne 116 and fill out a form or e-mail the news editor at 
(Olkgian§ipalkkit),tdu by T 1 am two days before It Is to run. 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral defense 
of the doctoral dissertation of Jeffrey Bartel at 10- 30 am today in 
BluemontW. 

■ Thelnrtitttute for CMcWscourw and Democracy will 
present a public debate on human rights and foreign policy 2-3:30 
pm. today In Union 212. 

■ Coffee HoiirvrilllM presented 4-Sp.tn. today at the 
Irrtematwial Student Center. The title B'Kyrgyntan Greetings from 
40 Girls" 

■ There will be a Women's Art Exhibit 6-9 tonight atS.CS. 
Musk, This exhibit wW feature K- State women artists and is open 
to the public 

■ The Gnduate School announces the final oral defense of 
the doctoral dissertation of Mudessar Shah at 8:30 a.m. Monday in 



Cantwelim 

■ The American Red Cross Gub of K State will be have an 
open, informational meeting at 8 p.m. Monday in Calvin 218 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral defense of 
the doctoral dissertation of Neeraj Nepai at 11:1 a.m. Tuesday in 
Cardwelim. 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral defense 
of the doctoral dissertation of Jincheng Gao at 4 p.m. Tuesday in 
Ackert 3248. 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral defense 
of the doctoral dissertation of Xtnyan Li at 4:20 p.m. Tuesday in 
Throckmorton 4031 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral defense 
of the doctoral dissertation of Kathryn Brooks at 9 a.m. Nov. 27 in 
EHuemont 368. 

■ The Graduate School announces the Anal oral defense of 
the doctoral dissertation of Kanna fabnra at 12:30 pm Nov 11 in 
Throckmorton 2002 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral defense of 
the doctoral dissertation of f uraha Mramba at 1 p m Nov. 27 in 
Waters 129. 



The blotter | Arrests in Riley County online at www.kstatecoilegian.com. 



Corrections and 
clarifications 

The re was a n error i n the Nov. 1 Collegia n 
Applications for the Angel Tree will be ac- 
cepted from Nov. 6 through Dec. 13. The Col- 
legian regrets the prior If you see something 
that should be corrected, call news editor Learn 
Sullen at (78$) 532-6556 « e-mail cotogm* 
ipubkuifdu 



Kansas State Collegian 

(USPS 291 020) The Kansas State Collegian, a 
student newspaper at Kansas State University, 
is published by Student Publications Inc., 
Kmjz* 103. Manhattan, KS 66S06. The Col- 
legian is published weekdays during the school 
yea r an d o n Wednesday* dunn g t he summer. 
Periodical postage is paid at Manhattan, KS 
66502. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to 
Kansas State Collegian, circulation desk, Kedae 
103, Manhattan, KS 66506 7167 
B Kansas State Collegian, 2006 





lcttafecollegian.com 



YOU AM IHVITf E» TO 

WORMS & REELS 

Eco-Troubador Sian Slaughter's fun and active environmental 
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the laughter. 

t APULT* • ' 1 CHILDMH UNO! ft 1 1 

favrviiAAv. NoviMim i e j jotii s io 
location: Unitarian Universalis! Church, 4 1H Zeaniialr Roai! 

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Project 

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5:30pm • 9pm , 
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All prgp^ds go to 
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3 Big Boulevards 



2 Enchiladas 



tHE K-STATE MARCHING BA/VO 
v IN CONCERT m 

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 19 

3:00pm 
AHEAKN FIELD HOUSE 

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( 



Friday, Nov. 17,2006 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 3 



Soldiers commended for leadership, flying in Iraq 



By Katelynn Ha tier 
tAMMSSTMKOUEWHN 

More than ISO soldiers re- 
ceived achievement medals 
honoring their service in Iraq 
during a ceremony in McCain 
Auditorium Thursday 

The soldiers all were mem- 
ben of the former 82nd Medical 
Company, which was reflagged 
in the ceremony following the 
awards presentation The com- 
pany just returned from a one- 
year deployment to Iraq, its 
third tour of duty in five years. 

One award winner was Cap- 
tain Justin Avery, He received 
a Bronze Star Medal, which is 
given for superior leadership, 
he said. Of the 270 awards giv- 
en, 15 were Bronze Star Med- 
als. Avery also received two Air 
Medals, which are given for 
every six months flying or for 
particular flying acts, he said 

"It's kind of mixed feel 
ings about this award" Avery 
said. "Our particular job is 
more rewarding knowing that 
you saved lives than receiving 
the actual medal is. It's a very 
good thing for our company, 
though." 

Avery's wife, Samantha. was 



present at the awards ceremo- 
ny and expressed pride for her 
husband's achievements. 

"It's nice for everybody else 
to see that he's a hero, nut just 
his family," she said. 

Another member of the au- 
dience, Maddy Tobias, said she 
traveled from Phoenix to see 
her friend, whom she hadn't 
seen in three years, receive an 
award. 

"I felt really proud of her," 
Tobias said. "I'm proud of all 
her military things." 

Her friend, Ginny Akins, is a 
staff sergeant and received one 
Army Commendation Medal 
and two Air Medals. 

"It feels good that people 
get recognized for what they've 
done and all the hard work 
they've put in," Akins said. 

Major Duslin K. Elder. 
Commander of the 82nd Medi- 
cal Company, shared remarks 
after the awards were present- 
ed. During the company's year 
of deployment, he said, sol- 
diers completed 2,200 combat 
missions and evacuated 2,800 
wounded soldiers 

The company was consti- 
tuted in 1943, and its soldiers 
have been deployed to Viet- 




ChHttoeher Hanewlnckal | (OLlfblAN 

Sgt . Albert Forshty salutes Lt. General Richard i. Serti after being awarded the Purple Heart Army Achievement Medal and two Air medals 
Thursday afternoon during the B2nd Medical Company Re-Deployment Awards Ceremony in McCain Auditorium. 

nam, Saudi Arabia and Soma Red One This changed its as Combat Aviation Brigade, 1st change," Elder said, "the noble 
lia. It was officially reactivated signment to the 2nd Battal- Infantry Division at Fort Riley, mission of evacuating our fel- 
as Charlie Company under Big ion, 1st Aviation Regiment, 1st "Although our name will low soldiers will not." 



Bilingual play penned by K-State professor opens to packed theater 



By Jesse Sachdeva 

KANSAS STME COLLEGIAN 

The aisles of the Little The- 
atre were packed, and its foyer 
overflowed with people Thurs- 
day night. 

Students, faculty and friends 
gathered to watch a performance 
of "Breaking Color Boundaries 
- Rompiendo limites en Colo- 
res," a play written by Alberto 



Domingo Gonzalez Valdes, 
visiting assistant professor of 
Spanish. 

Valdes' native Cuba is the 
setting (or the play, and ele- 
ments specific to that setting, 
including race relations and so- 
cial and spiritual customs, cre- 
ate an entirely different world. 
Even the local language was ad- 
opted as the dialogue frequently 
jumped back and forth between 



English and Spanish. 

The play tells the story of 
Billillo, an Afro-Cuban boy 
and his unrequited love for his 
Mulatto neighbor, Mayeya. The 
characters are played by Blake 
Zogleman, senior in business 
administration, and Guadalupe 
Magana, senior in secondary 
education, respectively 

Always afraid to express his 
love, Billillo is driven to mad 



ness after seeing Mayeya in the 
arms of a foreign tourist. 

Playing up both comedic 
and dramatic elements, the love 
story is juxtaposed with color- 
ful backdrops and fast paced 
performances by K- Slate's latin 
dance club, LatiRitmo 

Dressed in bold red and black 
outfits, members of LatiRitmo 
performed quick salsa routines 
during a dance-hall scene. 



Zogleman said he and the 
other cast members prepared 
for the play for six weeks. 

Brittany Bruns, senior in fi- 
nance, managed to sang a seat 
in the theater for the show. 

"lt was nice to see the differ 
ent perspective they put on it," 
Bruns said "The bilingualism 
made it a little hard to follow at 
times, though " 

Valdes said he was pleased 



with the turnout. 

"I'm happy with how it has 
turned out We were able to 
build on the first draft of the 
script throughout the process 
of daily rehearsing over the last 
month," he said. 

Because of the large number 
of audience members, Valdes 
said the cast might give a sec- 
ond performance after Thanks- 
giving 





Directory 




JHj he Salva ion Army 

(WORSHIP SERVICE SUNDAY 10:30 AM 

*r HA* Pr*r*f MMtini Monday # 6 PM 

A Mmn'i Sml Graua. Una** • J FH 

UN 




newhope 



WORSHIP WKVll. I . :,i \\] 



3905 Green Valltv Rd 



St Isidore's 

Catholic Student 
Center 

MASS SCHEDULE 

Tuesday- Thursday 10:00 p.m. 

Friday 12:10 pm 

Saturday 5 pm 

Sunday 9:30 am, 1 1 a.m. 

Sun. 4:30 p.m., 6 p.m. 
Father Keith Weber, Chaplain 

711D«ntson 539-7496 



COLLEGE 

CONNECTION 
Jam m in 4 Jesus 

Tuesday 7:00 pm 

at Manrwflan Free MttfwM Church 

1231 Poyrtti Ave, 
Across From City Path 

rllvlng4one.org 

785-77*4026 

(perlence God's 



€% 



JOURNEY 

r i i r j i , r I : i i i 

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2121 Blue Hills Road 

539-8691 

445am Sunday School 

1 1 :00 am Sunday Worship 

Praise Team Twice Lath Monih 



1901 Anderson Ave 539-3051 

Baptist Campus Center 



tomNp Sfnur a aii Mia < i-pri. KSU 

Sunday Sttmot: MMfttl < in 
Vnulji brake 10:1 S-1J:KI NaKXI 



„. .1 Mcmaid fc*u> ai Htltinttl I lufi K-*- 1 ' 
Mimilty HO- frill * ™ 



Tramp atari of God 

Mioiitriai 

Ml Ik* TO, Mantuiun. KS iWiVrt-alTF? 

l..,.p»l „l i hrltl. f..»-r •■« i.ixl. 
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Iiii* Study „ I in*' n! , ( }^*l. KMJ 



1021 I fciiaxai r\aa». 

lurln I'l INI 1J IKI Mullll^hl 



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to 

FIRST 
LUTHERAN CHURCH 

Saturday Service 

5:30 p.m. 

Sunday Worship 

830 and 11dm 

Church School lor all 

ages 

945 a.m. 

www fimluthtr^nrnjnhatun org 

i01h & Poynti 78S-S17 8S32 



At! Welcome to Worship! 

Yotw tnvittd' 



Timdiy 7 *pm 

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Everyone is Welcome! 




UITHERAN 
CAMPUS 



11*lV Afldttwn 

■si Came? at OrrMon % AMrrKNT- 



tic* 



Faith Evangelical Free Church 

•Worship at 8:00,10:30, 
10:40 

• Sunday School at 9: 15 

SnuiApdjnDn.AiBC tony 


1921 BarrwiRd 

1 6 Milei North 

ol Kimhjll 

776-20&6 









' "manbattan 
jmennonite church j 



lOOOFremonl 5.^-4079 



Worship; 10:45 SS;9:30 
Rixhiud & Barbara Gehnng. Pallors 

K -Si ait Student Group 

www manhaiim iLi.us.meruioniic pel 



PMluck l»t and 3rd Sunday 
after worship 



First 



Presbyterian 

Church 




Unitarian- f 
UniversaUsr\^ 
Fellowship 
of Manhattan 



401 fetiHbkRoad iWherr kjvm ukI 

mtu iiiixi |ukk our penooal jowncyl 

Program Sunday at 10 is i m Rtli{Kwi 

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{Celebra t ion, 
y Service 

First Presbyterian Church 

801 Leavenworth 
Manhattan, Ks 66S02 

785-537-0518 

Pastor: R.C. McConrvell 

Associate Pastor Anne Scheiber 



"Sing to the Lord 
a new song, 
his praise from 
the ends of 
the earth..." 
ChtHettipimtry lUmsfap Strive 
Sundays at 1 1:45 am 
Everyone is Wetoome 
Cotege FeUowshp Dmer 
to folow service 



wvvv..firstpresmarir>attari,com 




Vou are welcome at 

T^ssetrvblv of CXoa 



A 



Weekly Services 
Sunday 

Traditional Service 8 00 am 

Sunday School 9 30 am 

Contemporary Service 10:45 am 

Prayer Meeting 6 00 pm 

Wednesday 

Bible Study 7 00 pm 

Youth Group (grades 7 12) 

Royal Rangers (Boys Clubs) 

Misstonett.es (Girls Clubs) 

Chi Alpha Campus Ministries '00 pm 

(KSU Little Theater) 



T*» 



M 




yVunc> **i^»*dW fat AM i*-#viviH 



Rnv Todd Wrston Pnstot 

2310 Canrilewood Dr Monhatlan. KS 66503 

( T8B) 537 7633 www.manhalta.nag o«tj 



OPINION 



. 



■ 



i ■'■ 



TO THE POINT 

Think safety 

when driving 

home for break 

Ahhh, Thanksgiving break is 
< i iv four days away. 

It is easy to be swept away 
i,y the holiday nmmaHtn 

excitement, there editorial selected 

and debated 
i re some respon- by the editorial 

.l.ilities students ^ ard /™T£ en 

after a majority 

liould remember opinion is formed. 
r , . This Is the 

tore dnvmg Collegian's official 

:>me. °P ir,ion - 

First and fore- 
nost is safety. When driving long 
stances, it is important to make 
ure your vehicle can make the 
jumey. Check your oil, air up 
our tires, and make sure every- 
Wing is working properly. 

However, pre-trip preparation 
night not be enough if something 
iippens on the road. That is why 
I is best to pack a car safety kit 
ith jumper cables, a spare tire, 
iad flares and a flashlight. 

It's also wise to be prepared 
i drive in all types of weather. 
'rive slowly in the rain, sleet or 
now. If visibility is poor, pull 

or to the side of the road and 
ait until it improves. 

The roads will be crowded, 
. o be respectful of other drivers. 
Everyone will be in a hurry to get 
nme, but if you drive the speed 
iinit, you will be less likely to get 
1 ticket DC have a wreck. 

So when preparing to reach 
our Thanksgiving destination, 
COm&OQ sense. Take care 
i your vehicle and drive safely, 
our mom will thank you for it 
hen you arrive home safe and 
Hind. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Friday, Nov. 17, 2006 



t* 



- 






•—IK * H 5 A 5 STATE 

Collegian 



Imfly L«wrtnc* | f III I On IK t H i [ f 

Kerry Flxhtr | MAWmiH&tiiiTQK 

lunn Sulzwi | HI W, f DitW 

AM»r Bnmntwck | ( CPU Bit! 

M*9*n Mouc | 1 1 > ' ' UI« tOUO* 

Krlittn Rwtafttk | UMPIJS ILMTO* 

Anthony Mtndou | SPORTS (W1M 

Annttt* I awl* II | - H t fOtl Elxrat 

Owtn Kennedy | OPINION CUITOR 

Zachwy T. ickdi | W.iutTO EDUO* 

Sla**nOaN|PN0TDIpiTI)ll 

Ray<« Maynti | ONLINE EOITM 

Log«n C. ««1*in* | fuBuriBifOR 

Kally Wllltimi | «D MMiKEI 

Courtney Slaypan [ *SST t,(i utHMt 



WRITE TO US 

•'' \m can be submitted by t -mail to ittimmpab 
I (du. or In person to Kedne 116 Please include 
ii full name, year In school and major Letter* 

.twuld be limited to 250 words. All submitted letters 

' iy be edited for length and clarity 



CONTACT US 

Kin i*t State Collegian 
Kedtle 10! Manhattan, KS 66)02 

Display ads (785) 53/-6S60 

Classified ads ....[785)5*2-6555 

Newsroom (785) 5H-65S6 

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CAMPUS F0URUM 

395-4444 -or- 

fourum@spub.ksu.edu 



i IM Campus Fourum Is the Collegian's anonymous 
ystem. The Fourum is edited to eliminate 
vulgar, racist, obscene and libelous comments. The 
ion Is are not the opinion of the Collegian not 
they endorsed by the editorial staff. 

ppy Teias football osme. Hey, 8 1/2 Nike. Shoe 
! looking for owner 

H iy, so I totally but you. You may have crowd 

.u fed and rushed the held, but I did both of those 

'I caught a shirt from the shirt cannon Booyah. 

Discrete is an unforgiving substance. 



ed more Fourum? Go to www.kstatKollt 
o,tm for the full version. 



Who, me? 



Citizens can work to better society by admitting fault, taking responsibility 




RYAN 
SPENCER 



There's something extremely wrong in 
today's culture, besides that the country 
of Iran still exists. It can be summed up in 
one word: responsi- 
bility Well, the lack 
of it, actually, so it's 
three words. 

In today's fast- 
paced, modern, 
liberal society, it's 
easy to lose a sense 
of responsibility 

How many of us 
remember the infa- 
mous hot coffee lawsuit against McDon- 
ald's that lead to the "Caution: contents 
may be hot" label? Frivolous lawsuits 
cost U.S. small businesses $88 billion a 
year - an average of $150,000 for every 
company in the country, according to a 
June study by the US Chamber Institute 
for Legal Reform 

Instead of learning from a simple 
mistake and taking responsibility for your 
horrible driving that led to your spilt cof- 
fee, people seem to be more inclined to 
take a financially better route and sue for 
no reason 

For instance, according to Jury Verdict 
Research, the average medical mal- 
practice jury award has risen almost 75 
percent from 1995 to 2005 to an average 
$3.5 million per case, with some awards 
going as high as $40 million 

Then there are the kids We've heard 
time and again thai children watch too 
much TV'. But why r> 

Again, responsibility, this time on 
behalf of parents. Instead of doing their 
job and playing catch with foluiny in the 
backyard, it's easier to sit him in front of 
"SpongeBob SquarePants" 

In its latest paper, the Interna- 
tional loumal of Obesity monitored TV 



watching and body mass. 

Between the ages of S and 13, children 
watched an average of 2.33 hours df TV 
per weeknight. Children 13-15 yean old 
watched an average of 24.6 per week 

Another glaring example is divorce. 
There are some cases in which divorce 
is necessary - even my parents are 
divorced. But how many marriages could 
be saved if couples took responsibility for 
their actions and worked through their 
problems instead of taking the easy way 
out 9 Half of first marriages, 67 percent of 
second marriages and 74 percent of third 
marriages end in divorce, according to 
Jennifer Baker of the Forest Institute of 
Professional Psychology. 

Where does this lack 
of responsibility begin? 
Many places 
Where can 
it be 
solved? 
With 
each and 
every one 
of you. 

As college 
students, we 
often partake in 
behavior that is, 
well, unpredictable. 
But the answer 
lies with you. 
Watch your actions, 
adi mi fault and take 
responsibility Since your 
mother's not here, I'll say 
it: be careful. 




Ryan Spencn is » senior in Intel and 
restaurant management. Please send 
comments to opinion aspub.ksu.edu. 



Look beyond '08 for interesting election in "10 




Now that the hustle and bustle 
of the 2006 elections have mostly 
passed, wc can focus on an elec- 
tion that will have much 
more drama. No, not 2008 
- I'm talking about 2010. 

Sure, 2008 will have 
some interesting anti Hil- 
ary ads, and we'll see if 
Rep -elect Nancy Boyda 
lives up to her promises, 
but how can Kausans not 
look ahead to 2010' 

Kansas' own Sen. Sam 
Brownback is thought to 
be one of the possible social con- 
servatives vying for the Republican 
nomination for president in '08 
However, if he decides against 
this, or isn't nominated, his term 
in the Senate will expire in 2010, 
It is widely believed the senior 
senator will not seek re-election, 
honoring his self-imposed term 
limit. This would leave a Senate 



OWEN 
KENNEDY 



seat wide open And here is where 
it gets interesting 

Another term that will expire 
in 2010 is that of Gov. 
Kathleen Sebelius. She was 
quoted in the Nov. 14 edi- 
tion of the Collegian all but 
denying she would accept 
;i position in a Democratic 
White House 

" I ran for governor to be 
governor of this great state," 
she said "I intend to be 
right here" 
What better way to serve 
Kansas than as a voice in the U.S. 
Senate' Yes, a Democratic senator 
from Kansas. According to the 
Kansas Secretary of State's Web 
site, Sebelius won re-election by 
18 percentage points (59 to 41). 
This proves her popularity, but 
against whom might she run? 

Sen Pat Roberts, R-Kan,, was 
elected in 1996 after serving in the 



US House of Representatives for 
26 years, representing Kansas' first 
district. Ironically, he won the seat 
seat vacated by retiring Congress- 
man Keith Sebelius, father-in-law 
of the current governor. But taking 
from this model, a possible op- 
ponent for Sebelius in '10 could be 
Rep. Jerry Moran The Republican 
won "The Big First" with almost 
80 percent of the votes, according 
to the Secretary of State's Web 
site. 

Two well-known politicians 
in '10 could make one heck of 
a race, the name recognition of 
Sebelius to Moran's popularity and 
party affiliation - don't forget, this 
is a red state And who knows, 
maybe Rep Jim Ryun will make 
a triumphant return to seek the 
seat vacated by Brownback But 
either way, the national political 
scene could be extremely different 
in four years, so let's focus on a 



smaller scale. 

In 2010, Paul Morrison will 
most likely seek re-election as 
Kansas attorney general. After 
all of the bickering and negative 
campaigning of the 2006 election, 
from both sides, 2010 will be a 
test for Morrison. If he lives up to 
everything he said, he should win 
in a landslide, but if not, he will 
get the axe. 

While pundits and politicians 
are arguing and smearing in prepa 
ration for 2008, 1 encourage all 
of you to tune out Sean Hannity's 
verbal diarrhea, ignore the Barack 
Obama bandwagon, and look 
ahead to 2010 Who knows? 
Maybe by then the central issue 
won't be Iraq. 



Owen Kennedy Is a junior In managmtnt. 
Please send comments to 



- — — 

C 

o 
>■* 

CO 



o 
o 



< 

< 



O 




Friday, Nov. 17, 2006 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 5 



From the Public Editor: 

Readers want blotter in print 




LOGAN C 



I never cease to be 
amazed by the natural 
desire to 
know your 
neighbor's 
misdeeds. 

Com- 
plaints, 
direct and 
indirect, 
have come 
in saying 
readers miss 
reading the 
blotter, the 

Collegian's list of local ar- 
rests that used to appear on 
Page 2 each day. 

The latest, from Tuesday's 
Fouram: "Can you guys 
please put the blotter back in 
jhe paper? I like to laugh at 
Jl he felons when I'm in class, 
'—and I don't like to have to 
look for that And it's prob- 
ably the best part of the 
paper, too" 

I'll respond to that state- 
ment by each of its points 
On the first count: the edi- 
tors removed it at the begin- 
ning of this semester to make 
room for Page 2 features the 
blotter blocked. 

"The blotter's a waste 
of space," Emily Lawrence, 
editor in chief, said. "1 don't 
think every single little arrest 
is news." 

Lawrence has a point, 
but I do believe all arrests 
should be made public as a 
check on government power. 
The people have a right to 



| y know 



• • • 



hove 



We can get 
that (or 



* - 



died wit! 
MENU GUIDE 
in bad of tk 
Campus Phone Book 

nil ill 1 1 b Kedxie 103 
■Frl I «.*. - 5 »». 



know who the police have 
in jail. They usually want to 
know, too. 

Managing Editor Kerry 
Pischer said the blotter 
won't be back this semester 
because finals week is so 
close, and it's too late to 
redesign the page, She said 
the blotter also can grow 
too big to fit the news hole 
on Page 2, especially after a 
busy weekend. 

The officers of the Riley 
County Police Department 
are just too good at their 
jobs. 

On the second count: You 
can still laugh at the unlaw- 
ful - or unlucky - souls 
caught by the RCPD while in 
class, you only need a wire- 
less-equipped laptop. 

Plus, your professor can 
tell you're not paying atten- 
tion when there's a printed 
Collegian in front of your 
face. 

Look at a computer 
screen, arid most educa- 
tors will think you're taking 
notes, which is what you're 
supposed to do in class, 
right? 

On the third count; I'll 
have you know the most 
common comment I hear 
is no longer "1 want more 
Pourum." 

The new leader is, essen- 
tially, "I have no complaints. 
The Collegian has been good 
this semester." 
So there. 



This topic reminds me 
of the funny memories I 
have from past semesters 
of people coming into the 
newsroom to demand we cut 
the blotter. Specifically, the 
parts with their names. 

One woman from a year 
ago standi out in particular. 
1 was in the newsroom while 
she told the editors how they 
could not publish her name, 
just because she asked. 

This is not true. The Col- 
legian never omits anyone 
from the list of arrests to 
save them face, not even its 
employees. 

This woman kept begging 
and begging for the Colle- 
gian to leave out her name, 
but to no avail. After a while 
1 cut in and asked, "So, did 
you do it?" 

"Well, yeah," she replied. 



toq*n C, Maim Is the Collegians pub 
Ik editor and ■ stnior In print jeumal- 
lun. Send comment! to psMflrtdManf 
ipvsvtjv.ed* «t catd) him In person 
noon to 1 p.m. Monday it tat K-Staht 
Student Union. 



Senate grants councils 
small operating budgets 



By Mogon Motor 
KANSAS STATEC011EGIAN 

College councils no longer 
will have to pay for photo- 
copies and staples out of their 
own pockets. 

After problems with meet- 
ing deadlines and misused 
funds, Student Senate ap- 
proved a $300 operating bud- 
get for each college council at 
their meeting Thursday. 

Whereas the previous 
guidelines called for councils 
to request funds for events and 
other needs all together, the 
new bill, which passed with a 
vote of 52-3-2, automatically 
grants a small operating bud- 
get, then requires councils to 
apply for event funding sepa- 
rately. They can request funds 
for up to five events per year. 

College council allocations 
committee chair Amy Schultz 
said councils will receive the 
operating budget earlier un- 
der the new guidelines, at 
the start of each fiscal year in 
July. 

"Before, we had a lot of 
college councils turn in re 






$160,000 



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$50,000 
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quests late, and we were not 
able to fund them," she said. 
"With this, college councils 
receive their funding earlier, 
and it kind of relieves little 
problems like that that we 
had each year." 

Senators mentioned some 
councils also tried to get ex- 
tra funding for events through 
other budgetary requests 

"This creates uniformity 
so we don't have one coun- 
cil requesting all these things 
and another requesting very 
little," Schultz said. "It en- 
sures that college councils are 
not granted more than five 
event requests" 



We Kick Ads! 






Don t want to see 
you on page 2. 

BE 
RESPONSIBLE 



Some senators, however, said 
the councils should have to 
request money for a specific 
purpose. 

"I don't like the idea that 
they get money automatical- 
ly," .engineering senator Tim 
Weninger said. "In my experi- 
ence, we don't just give away 
money. It has to be for some- 
thing" 

In other business, senators 
approved the appointment of 
a new elections commission- 
er, Tyson Moore, senior in 
information systems, for the 
2006-07 Senate term. 



ROYAL PURPLE 



uv'\ I' V^Ot the sioiics 
you've t|i>l lo n'.ul. 



January 2007 

December 27, 2006 - January 10, 2007 



Time is running out Enroll today! To enroll and/or obtain an Interseasion schedule with complete course descriptions pnd 
prerequisites, visit http://www.dce ksu.edu/ If you prefer, call (785) 532-5566 or 1-800-432-8222 or visit the Division of Continuing 
Education at 131 College Court Building, 1615 Anderson Ave , Manhattan, KS 



Tuition for on-campus coursework. wilt be $164 per undergraduate resident credit hour and $227 per graduate reside*! cnx 
plus $1 per day special and health feet. A student services fee and/or materials fees may be requwerj for some courses A ' 
credit hour fee is assessed for Engineering and Architecture courses. R. 



hour, 
per 



Course Title 

Agriculture 

Practicum in Bakery Technology 

Architecture, Planning, a Design 

Topics n Architectural Design Methods; 

The Expressive Line 
LEED for Professional Accredtatton 
Beginning Airbrush 
Portfolio Design Studio 
Portfolio Design Studio 
Design Graphics and visual Thinking 
Probterna/Advanced Design GfSpnesMsual Thinking 
Computer Appncattons m Planning and Design 

^*spafl ^p ■j^pe^easwds^^p 

Understand* 

Forensic Medicine and (he Investigation of Death 

The History of the American Inteigence Community 

Sport and Exercise Personality 

Jazz in Kansas City and the Southwesi 

From Metropolis to (ha Heartland: Immigrant 

Experiences In America zji. 

Social Construction of Serial Murder 



Courae* 



GRSC701 



Ethics In Drama Therapy 
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Page 6 



SPORTS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Coggins moves from supporter to leader 



By Scott Glrard 

KANSAS SlMECQLLiaAN 

Claire Coggins is the leader of the 
K-State women's basketball team. 

IVo years ago, that couldn't have 
been further from the truth. 

During her sophomore season, 
Coggins was, at best, the fourth op- 
tion behind All-Big 12 Conference 
guard Laurie Koehn and forwards 
Megan Mahoney and All -American 
Kendra Wecker. She started every 
Big 12 game except one on a senior- 
laden team that won 28 games and 
advanced to the second round of the 
NCAA Tournament. 

"I came in being one of the young- 
est players with the big four, and I 
was very used to that type of a role," 
Coggins said. 

With the loss of Nicole Ohlde, 
Wecker, Koehn and Mahoney to the 
WNBA, Coggins was one of the last 
remaining players for K-State. 

"Claire went from an 18- to 20- 
minute-per-game player with an 
identity that was very supplemental, 
to walking in the gym as' a junior 
with a complete and total load on 
her shoulder," coach Deb Patterson 
said. 

With three freshmen and a soph- 
omore starting with her last season, 
Coggins had to step up her game and 
become more of a vocal leader on 
the court. 

"I was finding myself as a player 
and a leader," Coggins said. "I think 
it all gelled together just fine for me 
and my team" 

ONE OF ONLY TWO 

This season, Coggins is one of 



only two seniors on the team. A third 
senior, Twiggy Mclntyre, unexpect- 
edly left during the summer, leaving 
Coggins as the only senior to carry 
the offensive load. 

"Claire is a great leader and is just 
a great presence to have on the court, 
because she brings experience to the 
game that a lot of us don't have," 
sophomore guard Shalee Lehning 
said. 

As a freshman, Coggins averaged 
12 minutes a game and provided 
depth for K-Stale in the back court, 

"I love to look at them and think, 
'Oh my gosh, that is what I was like 
as a freshman, and I had no clue, ei- 
ther,'" Coggins said. 

Coggins is not only expected to 
assume the role of leader, but also 
she is expected to assume the role 
of the go-to player She led the team 
in scoring last year and was the only 
Wildcat recognized on the All- Big 12 
preseason women's basketball team. 

"We have a great deal of confi- 
dence in her knowing that she is 
willing to take everything on her 
back and be ready to play" Lehning 
said. 

LOOKING TO THE FUTURE 

The main concern of Coggins and 
the team is their performance this 
season. But many wonder what the 
future holds for the senior. 

She was named pre-season Hon- 
orable Mention All-Big 12, and Pat- 
terson said Coggins is potentially one 
of the best players in the conference. 

"She has put it out there and dem- 
onstrated what she is capable of," 
Patterson said 

Coggins has not ruled out the 



1 




*rty* 


B3NJ 

■Ha*aBL^_^sP^niBA bVJ 



Photos by StwM Doll | COLLEGIAN 
Stnior guard Lane* Harris works his way around a William & Mary defender 
during the first half of last Saturday's game at Bramlage Coliseum. 

Wildcats go for 3 in a row 
against Golden Eagles 



By Nick Dunn 

KANSAS StAUCOLLlGIAN 

Despite consistent shooting 
troubles through the beginning 
of the season, the K State men's 
basketball team will take a 2-0 re- 
cord into Saturday night's contest 
against Tennessee Tech. 

The Wildcats beat Rutgers 55- 
41 Wednesday in Piscataway, N.I., 
in their first road test of the sea- 
son. 

After going 2-8 on the road last 
season, K-State got off to a better 
start this year by beating the Scar- 
let Knights of the Big East Confer- 
ence. 

Strong defense helped hold 
Rutgers to just 19-percent shoot- 
ing from the field and allowed the 
Wildcats to win despite shoot- 
ing poorly for the second straight 
game. 

K-State shot just 32 percent, 
but the shooting woes of Rutgers 
helped the Wildcats coast to an 
easy victory. 

Only one Rutgers player made 
more than one held goal: J.R. In 
man with five. 

Senior guard Lance Harris has 
been the unexpected leader of the 
Wildcats' offense so far, scoring 
16 5 points and grabbing 10 re- 
bounds per game. 

K-State will try to shake its 
shooting slump Saturday when 



Tennessee Tech comes to Manhat- 
tan. 

The Golden Eagles enter with a 
1-0 record after beating Bluefield 
(Va ) College 110-69 Monday in 
Cookeville, Tenn. 

Saturday's game will be the sec- 
ond meeting between the schools; 
K-State beat Tennessee Tech in the 
1985-86 season. 

Tennessee Tech was picked to 
finish third in the Ohio Valley 
Conference preseason poll 

The Golden Eagles are led by 
junior guard Anthony Fisher and 
senior guard Belton Rivers, who 
led the team last year with 12.9 
and 12 points per game, respec- 
tively 

Fisher led the Golden Eagles 
with 18 points in the season-open- 
ing win. 

About 150 tickets from the in- 
dividual-game public allotment 
and 350 tickets unclaimed from 
the student allocation are avail- 
able for Saturday's game 

The tickets, priced at $15 each, 
will be on sale from 9 a.m. to 6 
p.m. today at the Athletic Ticket 
Office in Bramlage Coliseum. If 
any tickets remain on game day, 
they will go on sale at 7 p.m. at 
the Northeast and Northwest tick- 
et booths of Bramlage. 

— K Sutt ipom Information contributed 
to rtils story 




possibility of continuing her career 
in basketball after her eligibility runs 
out this season 
"I just want to take each day, each 



game, and try to be the best 1 can, 
and if it's meant to be. I'll keep play- 
ing. If it's not, then it's not," Coggins 
said 



College basketball entertains 
all season, not just in March 




SCOTT 

GIHARD 



I admit it. 1 am a college football 
fanatic, but it is never too early to 
celebrate a great 
basketball game. 

Although college 
football is in the 
most crucial part of 
the season, it is not 
the only sport on 
primetime ESPN. 
College basketball, 
only a few weeks 
old, already has 
produced some 

great upsets and fun games. The great 
football match-ups of the Sunflower 
Showdown and the No. 1 vs. No. 2 
matchup of Ohio Stale and Michigan 
are obviously the highlights of this 
weekend's events. But what is there 
to watch for sports fans before the 
weekend' Hockey'' No offense to the 
sport, but I can recall only one friend 
who claimed to watch hockey. 

It might not be March yet, but the 
intensity and drive of college basket- 
ball are just as thrilling to a true fan of 
the game. 

There are several reasons to flip 
that channel to one of the many 
basketball games thai will be shown 
almost every night on ESPN or one of 
its many networks. 

THE UPSETS 

Nearly everyone loves to see 
Cinderella teams like Gonzaga and 
George Mason upset the traditional 
powers ol the NCAA Tournament, 
unless the power upset is your team, 
of course Upsets do not just occur in 
March, though; teams in the Top 25 
are always the main targets of mid- 
major conference teams. This year 
should be no different 

PRESEASON TOURNAMENTS 

Preseason tournaments are the 
closest match-ups to March Madness 
fans will get until the actual thing 

The preseason tournaments, 
which seem to grow every year, might 
be less alluring, but they do offer a 
glimpse into the pageantry of college 
basketball. Take, for example, Butler. 
It was chosen to finish sixth in the 
Horizon League but already has upset 
Notre Dame and Indiana in the NIT 
Season Tip-Off Few people here 
know where Butler is or could even 
name another team in the Horizon 
Conference, but the Bulldogs already 
have received more national attention 



and television time than Kansas 

BRACKET ADVANTAGES 

So many people fill out brackets 
for March Madness, but few actually 
follow the whole basketball season. 
Watching a few games in November 
on ESPN or Fox Sports Net will not 
only show previews of the teams, but 
also will give fans an early advantage 
on completing those frustrating brack- 
ets. Early fans will recognize trends 
and the likes and dislikes that people 
who watch college basketball later in 
the season will never catch. Maybe 
guys could even find that inside ad- 
vantage to beat their girlfriends who 
choose the winning teams on the best 
mascot or team colors. 

DICKEY V 

Nothing gets me more excited for 
a basketball game than the vibrant, 
non-stop commentary of Dick Vitale. 
The announcer has been a main- 
stay of college basketball broadcasts 
since his not -so -successful attempt at 
coaching in the late 1970s. His catch 
phrases - "diaper dandies," "dipsy-doo 
dunkeroo," and "PTPer" - just add to 
the already electric atmosphere of the 
games he calls. To imagine the spirit 
Vitale brings to the game, imagine the 
exact opposite of Bob Huggins. 

Several upsets already have oc- 
curred, including the aforementioned 
Butler upsets, a Vermont upset over 
16th -ranked Boston College, a Virgin- 
ia upset over Top- 10 Arizona and, of 
course, the beatdown of third-ranked 
Oral Roberts gave Kansas Wednesday. 

Although teams might not be as 
solid as they will be in February, the 
intensity and level of competitiveness 
is just the same as it will be down 
the stretch. Why not watch the full 
season of a potentially amazing year 
of basketball, especially in Kansas? K- 
State is looking to change more than 
a decade of mediocrity with Huggins, 
Kansas is picked first in the nation by 
many polls, and Wichita State is ready 
to make another strong postseason 
run. All over the country, brackets are 
already being busted. Any night could 
produce the best game of the year. 

As Vitale so often says, "It's awe- 
some, baby!" 



Swtt Glnri \ * sophomore In print jaunaHun . 
Ptt*s* send comments to tportiifUpubJau. 



Friday, Nov. 17, 2006 

1-MINUTE 
DRILL 




FBC | Another day, another award 
for freshman quarterback Freeman 

K State's Josh freeman picked up his 
third national award this weed and fourth 
overall, as the quarterback has been chosen by 
the fans as the Cmgutar All-Amenta Player of 
the Wees after the freshman led the Wildcats 
to a dramatic 45-42 win Saturday night over 
defending national champion and No 4 Tens. 

Freeman, the first-ever Wlkkat to take 
the weekly honor, received 42 percent of the 
votes to claim the award over week 10 winner 
Darren McFadden (37 percent) of Arkansas. 
Georgia defensive back Tra Battle (14 percent) 
and Connecticut running back Donald Brown 
(7 percent) finished third and fourth, respec 
ovefy. 

Flayers were nominated for this week's 
award by a panel of ESPN college football 
analysts based on their outstanding perfor- 
mances last weekend. 

The award was announced Thursday at 
halftime of the Flttsburgh/West Virginia game 
on ESPN 

The Cingular All- America Player of the 
Week winner's list in 2006 indudes Rutgers 
running back Ray Rice, Notre Dame quarter- 
back Brady Otnnn, Michigan wide receiver 
Mario Manningham, Georgia Tech wide 
receiver Calvin Johnson, Tennessee quarter- 
back Erik Ainge, Texas quarterback Cort McCoy, 
Brigham Young quarterback John Beck and 
Arkansas' Darren Mtfadden. 

The Kansas City, Mo, native set a new 
K-State freshman passing mark for a season 
Saturday and now has 1,407 yards on the year. 
In his last three games, all conference wins, 
Freeman Is 55-of-77 for 681 yards and six 
touchdowns. 

Freeman has picked up Big 12 Offensive 
Player of the Week, Walter Camp National 
Offensive Player of me Week and the Master 
Coaches Survey National Offensive Player of 
the Week honors this week after his perfor- 
mance against Texas. 



FBC j DVD of K-State's win over UT 

to be released for purchase 

The K-State Department of Intercol- 
legiate Athletics announced Thursday it will 
release a special edition DVD of the Wildcats' 
thrilling victory over 
No. 4 Texas just in time 
for the holiday season. 

The'lnstant * 
Wildcat Classic" two- 
disc set includes the 
entire broadcast of the 
Wildcats' historic win 
over the defending 
national cham- 
pion Longhorns, plus r rlnc« 
pregame footage from the game, including 
K State's senior introductions and the fan 
appreciation thank -you videos that appeared 
on the video board at Snyder Family Stadium 
throughout the contest. 

Also included on the two-disc set Is 
coach Ron Prince's postgame news confer- 
ence. 

The -Wildcat Instant Classk" DVD set 
retails for $34.95 plus shipping and can be 
purchased online at wwwi-srorrspwTs.com, 
in person at Ihe Athletics Ticket Office in 
Bramlage Coliseum or by calling toll -free 1 
(800) 221-CATS. The ticket office is open from 
9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday. 




EQU | Equestrian team to ride 
in 4-event competition at home 

K-State hopes to avenge an early-season 
loss to Oklahoma State Saturday when it ptays 
host tp Oklahoma State and New Mexko Stale 
at Fox Creek Stables in Manhattan. 

K- Stale trawled to Oklahoma State on 
Oct 15 and fell to the Cowboys 16985-1720. 

"We're going to have to ride well," coach 
Teresa Slough said. "The lasl time agamst 
Oklahoma State, we tied and eventually 
lost We hope to improve this time and gel a 
victory over them." 

The teams will compete in four events- 
equitation over fences, reining, Western horse- 
manship and equitation on the flat. Slough 
said the team has been working on lechnnw 
and other strategies. 

"We've been practicing the elements 
and patterns thai we know we have to nde" 
she said. "We're just trying to get focused and 
ready logo" m 

This will be Ihe last fall meet for the 
Wildcats They wi travel Feb. 24 to Waco 
Texas, to face off against Baylor to begin L 
spring season. 

"Our biggest concern is how everyone 
rife nd that everyone rides well and h*' 
good mprStough said. "We'd npjkh J ' 
into Christmas break with a wm- " 



-by Wendy Haun 



Friday, Nov. 1 7, 2006 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 7 



Graduate fair showcases math, science programs 



By Rftglni Nowak 
KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

The 2006 STEM Gradu- 
ate Pair it today and Satur- 
day for thoie considering 
graduate school, or matter'! 
degree student* intereited in 
K- State') doctoral programs. 

Students can use thii op- 
portunity to learn more about 
K-State programs In science, 
technology, engineering and 
mathematics (STEM). 

"It is an excellent oppor- 
tunity," said Carol Shanklin, 
vice provost of the Graduate 
School. 

"Any undergraduate that 
is interested in the graduate 
program and that is consider- 
ing for applying to graduate 
school for next fall should at- 
tend." 

To give K-State's under- 



graduate students and stu- 
dents from other universities 
in the region an opportunity 
to learn about graduate pro- 
grams at K-State, a planning 
committee from the K-State 
Graduate School, support- 
ed by representatives from 
each of the colleges from the 
STEM fields, will be host to 
this year's graduate fair at re- 
state. 

The colleges of Agricul- 
ture, Arts and Sciences, and 
Engineering are involved 
in providing an overview of 
graduate education, gradu- 
ate assistantship and other 
financial support, resources 
available, and community in- 
formation. 

"This way, students have 
an opportunity to interact 
with graduate students, fac- 
ulty and staff to learn more 



about the requirements for 
graduate school," Shanklin 
said. 

Shanklin said this fair is 
important because It will In- 
form students of requirements 
for tuition and opportunities 
for assistantship to help fund 
their graduate education and 
will allow them to interact 
with graduate students to 
learn what it really means to 
be a graduate student. 

The graduate fair begins 
tonight with a tour of cam- 
put. Later, there will be vari- 
ous activities for students and 
faculty to interact. Shanklin 
said. 

Several programs, with 
staffing planned according 
to interest and the number of 
registered students, will take 
place throughout Saturday. 

"There will be a panel of 



six graduate students who 
talk about what it it like to be 
a graduate student, why they 
chote to come to K-State for 
their graduate ichool, and 
what the responsibilities of 
graduate teaching and gradu- 
ate retearch assistants are," 
Shanklin said. 

They will be alto talk- 
ing about activitiet beyond 
the academic field that took 
place in the Manhattan area 
and that they participated 
in." 

Students will hear current 
students' advice about apply- 
ing and succeeding in gradu- 
ate school. Additionally, peo- 
ple will talk about financial 
aid for graduate school. 

After the panel, students 
will proceed to the program 
they selected when register- 
ing to learn more about the 



specific research and require 
menu of the program in 
which they are interested. 

"They will also learn about 
research opportunities within 
the department," Shanklin 
taid. 

"They get to interact with 
graduate students and hear 
what it's like to work in that 
specific program." 

The different graduate 
programs will have informa- 
tion tablet available during 
breakfast and lunch. Stu- 
dents who are interested in 
more than one program can 
look through all programs' 
information. 

The fair will conclude with 
another tour of the K-State 
campus for those who mitsed 
the Friday tour. 

Thirty-eight students from 
22 different universities have 



registered to participate. Stu- 
dent! from several other Big 
12 Conference univertities, 
as well as regional tchoolt, 
will attend, 

Although itudents who 
didn't register still can par- 
ticipate in the graduate fair, 
Shanklin taid it it necessary 
to sign up in advance to the 
Graduate School can supply 
enough information material, 
offer a variety of programs 
and provide enough staff and 
professors 

"We have to plan for the 
meals, events and the infor- 
mation packets that will he 
distributed," she said. 

Further information about 
the 2006 STEM Graduate 
Fair is available on its Web 
site (wtuw.k-state.edu/grad/ 
gspeopleorg/gradf air/index, 
htm). 



Agriculture conference features 
speakers, sessions for minorities 



Roberts loses chairmanship 

Democrats take over Congress key positions 



By Kristin Hodges 

KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

More than 80 students 
from different colleges will 
meet today at K-Statc to fo- 
cus on academics, scholar- 
ship and preparing (or the 
work force. 

The Region IV "Innova- 
tion, Exploration and Dis- 
covery" conference for the 
national organization Minor- 
ities in Agriculture, Natural 
Resources and Related Sci- 
ences, will be at K-State to- 
day and Saturday, said Zelia 
Wiley, adviser for the K-State 
chapter. 

"It's a great opportunity 
for K State to be showcased ," 
she said. 

Wiley said the conference 
will feature several speak- 
ers who are national officers 
for the organization, as well 
as the keynote speaker, Fred 
Cholick, dean of the College 
of Agriculture 

Undergraduates, graduates 
and professionals will attend 



different sessions and inter- 
active hands-on workshops. 

There also will be a tour 
of the new flour mill to 
showcase the facility because 
K-State has the only grain 
science and industry depart- 
ment in the nation, Wiley 
said. 

She said the conference is 
open to all K-State students 
and will continue through 
Saturday. 

Conference attendees wilt 
participate in social activities 
in the K-Statc Student Union, 
including bowling and Union 
Program Council's After 
Hours. 

Daysha |efferson, senior in 
food science, is the president 
of K-State's chapter and will 
attend the conference. 

"It's amazing on leader- 
ship, because it's supposed 
to prepare us for the annual 
conference in March," Jeffer- 
son said 

"It kind of updates us for 
everything." 

Career and Employment 



Services will offer a work- 
shop on resume's to help pre- 
pare the students to meet the 
corporations that are at the 
conference, she said. 

Jefferson said the confer- 
ence will demonstrate and 
publicize K-State's agri- 
culture program to diverse 
groups of people. 

"Not a lot of people know 
about ag at K-State, as far as 
minorities are considered," 
she said "We're low in num- 
bers" 

Students who are College 
of Agriculture ambassadors 
and members of multicultur- 
al student organizations will 
help with the conference. 

Brandon Clark, gradu- 
ate assistant for the Multi- 
cultural Student Office, said 
some of the students in mul- 
ticultural organizations will 
shuttle students to and from 
event activities and help with 
registration. 

"Our main goal is to show 
them some good K-State hos- 
pitality," Clark said. 




By Megan Mosar 

KANSAS MATE COLLEGIAN 

The midterm elections 
Nov. 7 meant a shift in the po 
litical makeup of Congress, as 
Democrats 
came into 
the majority 
for the first 
time since 
1994. 

Demo- 
crats now 
will chair 
all Congres- 
sional com- 
mittees and 
head both 
legislative 
bodies when 
Congress re 
convenes in 
January. 

House 
Democrats 
chose Rep 
Nancy Pe- 

losi, D Calif . as the first-ever 
female speaker of the House 



Roberts 

SENATOR 




Pclosi 

RiPRESENTATlUE 



when they met Thursday. Pe- 
losi's position puts her third in 
the order of presidential suc- 
cession. 

The party ignored Pelosi's 
choice for majority leader, Jack 
Murtha, D-Pa.. a strong anti- 
war proponent, opting instead 
for Hep Steny Hoyer, D-Md.. 
a 25-year veteran of Congress, 
by a vote of 149-86, according 
to an Associated Press article. 

In the Senate, Sen Harry 
Reid, D Nev., was named ma- 
jority leader Tuesday. Reid 
chose Sen. Dick Durbin, D- III., 
as assistant majority leader. 

Sen Pat Roberts, K-Kan., 
will lose his post as Senate In- 
telligence Committee chair. 

Roberts, a K-State alumnus, 
has held the position since be- 
fore the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks 
and since has seen the wars in 
Afghanistan and Iraq while in 
office. The Intelligence Com- 
mittee chair became a key 
post in a time of terrorism and 
concerns over domestic secu- 
rity. 



The senator endured scru- 
tiny from critics and fellow 
politicians who have criticized 
the committee for its lack of 
preparation for such events 
and lack of knowledge on is 
sues like weapons of mass 
destruction, according to an 
article in the Lawrence Jour- 
nal World 

When Senate Democrats 
caucus next Tuesday to for- 
mally choose Roberts' succes- 
sor, the likely choice will be 
committee vice-chair Sen Jay 
Rockefeller, D-W.Va. 

The 69-year-old Rockefell- 
er is known for attacking Re- 
publicans on domestic issues 
and their treatment of work- 
ers and the poor, according to 
the AP. 

Rockefeller and Roberts 
issued a report that criticized 
pre-war intelligence from the 
CIA and other agencies, but 
the two have polar opinions 
on the White House's- treat- 
ment of pre-war intelligence, 
according to the AP 




NEW: AGGIEViLLE PICK-UP STATION 



1*4 tHflt tt,\ 



itftvwtgt 



Two ways to get a ride home! 

• Agglevllle Pick-up Station 
at the 1 2th * Bluemont Willie's Car Wash 

• Call 539-0480 If not In the Aggieville area 



Every Weekend! 

Thursday, Friday, and Saturday 

11pm -3am 



A free service provided by the K-State SGA, 





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PageS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Friday, Nov. 1 7, 2006 



WINTER | Driving in snow, ice requires slower speed, more room SMOKE | Youth show activism 



Continued from Page 1 

The best advice for driving 
in bad winter weather is to not 
drive at all, if you can avoid 

Don't go out until the snow 
pluws and sanding trucks have 
hud I chance to do their work, 
1 1 id uKvays allow extra time. 

If you must drive in snowy 
conditions, make sure your 
car is prepared and you know 
how to handle road condi- 

It's helpful to practice win- 
ter driving techniques in a 

ikiWv'. open parking lot, so 
you're familiar with how your 
[ ir handles. Consult your 
owner's manual for tips spe- 
cific to your vehicle, and fol- 
low this advice 

DRIVING IN SNOW, ICE 

a Decrease your speed and 
i iv i' yourself plenty of room 

!np You should allow at 
kitst three times more space 
Ihtd usuul between you and 
the cir in front of you 
■ Brake gently to avoid skid- 
ding If your wheels start to 
lock up, ease off the brake. 
a Turn on your lights to in- 

iW your visibility to 



other motorists. 

■ Keep your lights and wind- 
shield clean. 

■ Use low gears to keep trac- 
tion, especially on hills 

■ Don't use cmise control or 
overdrive on icy roads. 

■ Be especially careful on 
bridges, overpasses 
and infre 
quently trav- 
eled roads, 
which will 
freeze first 
Even at tern 
peratures above 



erpasses 
love \^^4 




wheels skid: 

life your foot off the 
S*er ■ tin flection you want the front wheels to 
lo.n'jWWllBirili^ireiMlngWtstmWtlfthn'ff 
iMtflo, rtoht, steer right. 
If your rwwbttfaiUrtsildino. the other way siyou 
M» tht steering, wheel toward Hut side. ** rtwjM haw 



freezing, if the 
conditions are wet, you 
could encounter ice in 
shady areas or on ex- 
posed roadways like 
bridges 

■ Don't pass snow 
plows and sanding 
trucks The driv- 
ers have limited 
visibility, and you're 
likely to find the road in front 
of them worse than the road 
behind. 

■ Don't assume your vehicle 
can handle all conditions 
Even four-wheel and front - 
wheel drive vehicles can en- 
counter trouble on winter 
roads. 



steer left and right j few times to get your whin* 
under control. 
JM If you tuvtsundard brakes, pump them gentry. 
t«yoohw*rrtModbrato(ABS),dow«rjuinptrie 
brakes. Apply steady pressure tottie brakes. 




You wW feel the brakes puhe — this h 
normal. ^^^ 



D^ 





% 

t^^k. tfyou 
Nfl get stu< 



j 





if you 
get stuck: 

Do not ipin your wheels. This will onry dig 
\\ jM youtndeeoet. 

Turn your wheels from side to side a few times to push 
•• \£ snow out of the way. 

J Use a light touch on the gas to ease youicii out 
list a shovel to dear snow away from the wheels and the under- 
^^k skteofthetar, 

. Pwriantkittylh^gn^orsaAlntlHpa«hofth(wJMhu 
■^ help gain traction 

g the vehkte. (Chid your owners manual first — It 

image th* transmission on some whkJes.) Shift 

(mm forward to reverse and back again. Each time 
( m gear, give a light touch on the git 



until the vehicle gets going. 



Take your foot off the gas and shift to 

neutral, but don't try to steer Immediately. 

As the wheels skid sideways, they will slow 

the vehicle, and traction will return. As It 

does, steer in the direction you want to go. 

Then put the transmission In *driw>" or 

release the dutch and accelerate 

gently. 



Continued from Page 1 

whose efforts predate smoking 
legislation in Manhattan, has 
been assisted by a partnership 
with Buffalo Wild Wings. 

"We feel like if they were go- 
ing to be supportive of us, we 
were going to continually sup- 
port their business," she said. 

The bulk of funding for the 
group's expenses comes from 
Youth As Resources and the Ri- 
ley County Health Department 

Emily Berry, president of 
Teens Leading Teens and MHS 
student, said response to the 
group had been largely positive 

"I think we get a really awe- 
some response, and it kind of 
shows people we're willing to 



do anything to try and make a 
difference," she said. 

Opponents, though, recog- 
nize the persuasive influences 
and emotional appeal of young 
advocates 

"The power is the kids," said 
Devin Peifer of Fort RUey, 

Getting those too young to 
vote involved in the issue is a 
powerful and passionate tool 
and a welcome reprieve from 
what many claim is an incurable 
social apathy. 

"You hear so many times that 
the youth are deteriorating and 
it's just completely changed my 
perspective," said Janelle Mc 
1 1 vain, senior in family life and 
community services and Teens 
Leading Teens intern 



Warrant leads to arrest 





By Leann Sutoen 
KANSAS STATE COLLEGkAN 

A Manhattan man was ar- 
rested Wednesday as the result 
of an ongoing investigation into 
the distribution of crack cocaine 
and marijuana in the Manhat- 
tan and Riley County area 

lames O. Smith 111, 814 
Leavenworth St., Apt 2, was 
arrested after officers from the 
Riley County Police Depart- 
ment carried out a search war- 
rant and seized 2 1/2 ounces of 
crack cocaine and 1/2 pound 



of marijuana The street value 
of the drugs was more than 
$6,400. according to a news re- 
lease from the RCPD. 

Smith was arrested lor pos- 
session of crack cocaine and 
marijuana with intent to distrib- 
ute within 1.000 feet of a school, 
no Kansas drug tax stamp, un- 
lawful acquisition of drug pro- 
ceeds and felony possession of 
drug paraphernalia Bond was 
set at $20,000. 

According to the release, the 
investigation is ongoing, and ad- 
ditional arrests are anticipated. 






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Ask why discerning faculty members have us manage their 
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Get your 
loyal Purple yearbook in 
Kedzie 103, 
or call 785-532-6555 




Spring 2007 

• Managing Editors 
• News Editors 

• Desk Editors • Reporters 

• Copy Editors • Designers 

• Photojournalism 

• Graphic Journalists 
• Graphic Artists 

• Online Journalists 



Applications due 
* p.m. Friday, Nov, 17. 

Pick up applications 
in Kedzie 103, 



KANSAS STATE 



* Ifa 


LMn^jtSbo m 


■fck^e^LH 


1 



Have you ever had to 
convince everyone that 

working on the 

Homecoming Float would 

be fun"? 

Our paper is a lot more fun to work 
with than toilet paper. 

Collegian Advertising Sales- 
We re not selling toiletries 



It von .imwt'red yt>\ lo Hie question above, you know what II 

inki s to he In talvt Come he a part ul our tcini during Hip 
^piiri^ ti'nwtler. We IP looking lor Rood communkators w* II 

I ■ 1 . 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II ' i <■ ■■ I IVi > i k i 1 1 j> 1 1 ( il II i .1 1 (' i 11 ftp I wpr 1 1 ( |,i net 
Monday IhtuuRh Friday 9am-Spm, 



COUHIA' 
K-JfSMl 



.unit tM lOI Kn j, i H*LI 

. .1,1 



R LlfTtRDUl IN lOI 
• NOV 17 4>M 

C*tl (7BS!SJl-07ii 



CLASSIFIEDS 



To place an advertisement call 



Friday, Nov. 1 7, 2006 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 9 



L|| I II _ ,, ,, 

" Ll» :: v - J : 



■ i 1 1 ii 

ij i . i ■ • 



LET'S RENT 




FOUR- BEDROOM, two 

bath Fenced yard, 
garage Pel* oh. 

785317-7713. 





Hiilli'iiri Board 




LEAHN TO FLYI K-State 
Flytng Ck* has live air- 
planes and lowest rates 
CHI 78&-77G-1744. Mm, 
ksu edu*slc 



FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted Share three-bed- 
room private home Seri- 
ous students only S325 
plus one- third utilities Pra- 
ter leaae through summer. 
7B5-S39-576a. 

ROMMATE WAN IK) 
Three-bedroom house 
$350. utilities included 
Washer/ dryer, fenced 
yard, tun kitchen, oft street 
parking, close to campus. 
7B5- 3 13-4730 




Lost and round ads can 
be placed free for threw 



FOUND: FEMALE'S left 
shoes at KSU vs. Texas 
game at north goalpost. 
White with pink NIKE 
swish. six* 8 1/2. 
785-110-3356 




Housing Real F stale 




Manhattan CITY Ordi- 
nance Ml 4 aeaurae ev- 
ery person equal opportu- 
nity I n ho u ■ I n g without dl»- 
tlnetkwi on account of 
race, hi familial statue, 
military status, dttabltlty, 
religion, age, color, na- 
tional origin or ancestry 
Violations should be re- 
ported to the Director of 
Human Resources at City 
Hall, (785)587-2440. 




MANHATTAN CITY Ordi- 
nance 4814 sasuree ev- 
ery person equal opportu- 
nity In h ou elng wtlho irt dle- 
llnctlon on account of 
race, sex, familial status, 
military statue, disability, 
religion, ego, color, na- 
tional origin or ancestry. 
Violations should be re- 
ported to the Director of 
Humeri Resources at City 
Hall. (785)587-2440 

ONE AND two-bedroom 
apartment, 700 Fremont 
$450 and $600 One 
month deposit, no pets 
785-556-0713 

ONE-BEDROOM 
CLOSE to campus in 
newer complex No pets 
7B5-3 13-7473. 

TWO-BEDROOM/ ONE 
bath lownhouse $85000. 
new construction Also 
two-bedroom/ two bath 
apartment near the mall. 
call Wildcat Property at 
785-537-2332 




ONE-BEDROOM, walk to 
class. No drtnklng. Smok- 
ing, or pets 785-539-1554 

TWO- BEDROOM 
HOUSE. Available Jan- 
uary 1. 2007 Close lo 
campus. No pets Call 
785-639-1975 or 

785-313-4465 




14X70 NEWLY remod- 
eled, two-bedroom, two 
bathroom home, reason- 
able lot rent, 5228 Spar- 
row Lane #81, Rocky 
Ford Trailer Court 
785-565-0525 



FEMALE SUBLEASER 
needed for two-bedroom 
two bath apartment Con- 
tact Colista at 
785-543-4258 Available 
January 1. 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 
needed tor January- July 
lour- bedroom house 
$300 per month plus One- 
lourth utilities Washer/ 
dryer. dishwasher in- 
eluded, 620-271-2966. 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 
needed lor January Two- 
bedroom, one bath apart- 
ment No smoking Must 
love animals $275 plus 
one-half utilities baby- 
goth9ksu.edu 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 
needed January: one bed- 
room In two-bedroom, two 
full bathroom at University 
Crossing. $375, fur- 
nished. 913-744-9994. 
errrthomasltlksu.edu for 
pictures 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 
needed in January. Four- 
bedroom, two bath. Close 
to campus. $300 plus one- 
fourth utilities Call Jake 
91 3-378-3395 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 
needed immediately. 

Close to campus, off- 
street parking $400 a 
month utilities included. 
913-961-0673. 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 
wanted 10 share four-bed - 
room/ two bath apartment. 
First month tree. $315/ 
month. Available now 
through Jury 2007 
907232-4601 
FURNISHED APART 
MENT One -bedroom 
One bathroom, washer/ 
dryer Rent $375. Trash 
and cable paid. 
785-31 7- 6313 

MALE SUBLEASER 

needed In January $300 
per month, plus one-third 
utilities. Three -bedroom, 
two bath Gall 

78S- 342-2932 

MALE SUBLEASER 

needed Spring 2007. 
close to campus. $300 
per month plus one-hall 
utilities. Please call Bran- 
don Bayless 
765-230-051 2 

ONE TWO bedrooms 
available. 809 Bluemont 
M'akt or female. Just re- 
modeled Spring 
Semester. Four other 
roommates $300' month. 
Contact Shane 
785-341-2178 

SUBLEASER NEEDED, 
spring 2007 semester. 
$350/ month Nee. newer, 
three-bedroom house, 
buHl 1997 785-221-2282 

SU9LEASERS NEEDED 
for three- bedroom apart' 
men I. One and one- half 
bath $240/ room close to 
campus and Aggieville 
Available January Con- 
tact 785-537-7810, 
316-214-4745 




Employment 'Careers 




FEMALE ROOMMATE 
needed $258/ plus one 
third utilities Pets nego- 
tiable, washer/ dryer 
Within walking distance of 
Aggieville Contact Randl 
785-215-9026 

FEMALE™ ROOMMATE 
needed toe tour-bedroom 
$350/ month plus 
gas. SBC 
Quiet, nice house, major 
appliances included 

(7B5-58T-9207> 
(765-230-3000). 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted lor three- bedroom 
house. $300, utilities pad 
Can 785-537-4947 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted to share 3 bed- 
room apartment near cam 
pus $250 per month plus 
1/3 utility Available Jan- 
uary lit. 785-537-1 748. 



ACCOUNT SERVICE 

REPS needed to start full- 
time, on choice of either 
mid Nov date or Isle Dec 
data, at Secunty Benefit 
Topeka, KS AH degree 
programs welcome tor 
this entry-level career op- 
portunity After compre- 
hensive training, ASR's 
provide information and 
service (no sailing or solici- 
tation) relating to financial 
products. Competitive 

salary and benelits pack- 
age tor this opportunity in 
our dynamic, technology - 
based business se2 Ap- 
ply via our online apples 
ticn at www.secuntybene- 
Irtcom or phone (785)- 
438-3732 Equal Opportu- 
nity Employer 

APpAinTMenT SETTER 
CivlcPlus is the nations 
leading provider of City. 
County and School web- 
sites We have full and 
part-lime positions in Man- 
hattan with significant in- 
come potential tor the 
right Individual This posi- 
tion Involves calling poten- 
tial clients to setup webi- 
nar appointments. Pay Is 
$10/ hour plus $40 tor 
each wsbinar appoint- 
ment you setup Full - 
lime benefits include 
health, dental . paid holi- 
days, paid vacation and 
401 (k) matching Email 
resume in Microsoft Word 
or tent lormsi lo |Obs@- 
clvlcplus.com 

ARE YOU LOOKING FOR 
A CHANGE? DOES DAY 
SHIFT. NO WEEKENDS 
OR HOLIDAYS, AND NO 
CALL INTEREST YOLP 
We have full-time CLINIC 
NURSE (RN or LPN) posi- 
tion open in our Pediatric 
office Our deal candidate 
will be energetic, tlexlbie. 
work well as a team mem- 
ber, and have a desire to 
work in a PROFES- 
SIONAL. COLLABORA- 
TIVE environment Hours 
ere 8:30am - 5pm. Mon- 
day - Friday. Applicant 
must have a vald unre- 
stricted Kansas nursing li- 
cense, be graduated from 
a accredited nursing pro- 
gram: be familiar with 
ICD-9 coding and auto- 
mated equipment, the abil- 
ity to plan, organize and 
perlrom nursing care: and 
work as team member in 
fasl paced environment 
Doctor's office experience 
is preferred but not re- 
quired Interested and 
qualified nurses should ap- 
ply to Geary Community 
Hospital, 1102 St Mary's 
Road, P.O Box 490, Junc- 
tion City, K5 66441: small 
cwW9flcMts.org or fax to 
785-236-1700 Equal op- 
portunity employer 
BARTENDING $300 a 
day potential. No experi- 
ence necessary Training 
provided Call 

) 800 965-5520 en 144 

CLEANING CREW - Fl. ii 
bie Night Hours- Farm Bu 
reau Is seeking a Building 
Services Attendant to per- 
form routine night mainte- 
nance and general clean- 
ing in and around our 
building and grounds 
Hours are flexible (pan - 
lime 4 hour shifts or lux 
time 8 hour shifts.) All 
shifts occurring between 
10.30pm and 7:00am Sun- 
day through Thursday 
Benelits provded lor full- 
time candidates High 
school diploma or equiva- 
lent . extensive physical el- 
lort required To apply 
and view our other oppor- 
tunities, please email your 
resume to bill pmegari+lbi 
financial com 

EARN $2500+ monthly 
and more to type simple 
ads online www dalaen- 
trytypers.com 

EARN $800 - $3200 a 
month to dnve brand new 
cars with ads placed on 
them www AdDnveTeam 
com 



THE COLLEGIAN cannot 
verify Ihe financial poten- 
tial of advert liemen I • In 
the Employment/Career 
classification. Readers 
are advised to approach 
any tuch business oppor- 
tunity with rea- 
sonable cau- 
tion. The Collegian urge* 
our reader* lo contact the 
Better Business Bureau, 
501 SE Jefferson, 
Topeka. KS 66807-1190. 
(788)232- 0454. 

4 OLIVE'S Win* Bar now 
hiring lunch cook*. Flexi 
ble hours, competitive 
pay Apply in person 3033 
Anderson Avenue 



GRAPHIC ARTS designer 
assistant Part-time posi- 
tion, $10 78 hourly Sub- 
mit by November 22, 
2006 This entry level posi- 
tion creates posters, fliers, 
brochures, and similar ma- 
le nals. Eligible for sick/ an- 
nual leave accrual, 40 IK, 
retirement and health' life 
insurance benefits. Re- 
quirements: degree in 
graphic design, art or re- 
lated field which Involves 
artistic creativity or work 
experience performing the 
duties described above 
Must be knowledgeable of 
Adobe InDesign Photo- 
shop, and Hustrator soft- 
ware Send resume to: 
CPAC/ NAF Branch Fort 
Riley. KS Brenda Swrtier, 
319 Marshall Ave. Fort Ri- 
ley, KS 66442. Fax re- 
sume to 785-239-3635, 
phone 785-239-2134 

GRAPHIC DESIGNER 
CivlcPlus Is the nations 
leading provider of city, 
county and school web- 
sites Both full-time and 
work -at -home (contract) 
positions are available. 
Full -irme benefits include 
health, dental, paid holi- 
days, paid vacation and 
401(k) matching Email 
resume and design sam- 
ples to jobs @ civicplus.com 

HARRY'S DAYTIME 

DISHWASHER NEEDED. 
Shirts 10am - 3pm on 
Mon-Wed Fn and/ or 
Tuea-Thura. Soma night 
and/ or weekend availabil- 
ity Apply In person at 418 
Poyrtu Ave Good Ply. 

HELP WANTED KSU 
Beef Cattle Research Cen- 
ter Contact Matt Oulnn 
at 785-539-4971 or 
mfq9kau.edu. 

iMTERV SHIPPERS 
Earn up lo $150 E (pen- 
ance not required Under- 
cover shoppers needed to 
fudge retail and dining es- 
tablishments Call 

800-722-4791. 

PAID SUMMER Intern- 



EPA National Labo- 
ratory in Las Vegas, 
Nevada Visilwww.engext.- 
ksu.edu for position and 
application information. 
Apply now 1 

PROGRAMMER CIVIC- 
PLUS is the nations lead- 
ing provider of city, county 
and school websites. Full 
- time position in Manhat- 
tan, Microsoft ASP or 
SQL experience required. 
$14 50/ hour plus health, 
dental, paid holidays, pad 
vacation and 401 tk) 
matching. Email resume 
in Microsoft Word or text 
format to jobs#civicplus - 
com 

SALES CIVICPLUS is tne 
nations leading provider 
of city, county and school 
websites This full-time po- 
sition m Manhattan has 
significant Income poten- 
tial for the right individual 
$24,000 base plus aggres- 
sive commission sched- 
ule. Benelits include 
health, dental, pad holi- 
days, pad vacation and 
401 (k) matching. Email 
resume In Microsoft Word 
or text formal to fobs®- 
clvicplus.com. 

SERVERS WANTED 
Manhattan Country Club 
is now hiring servers tor 
all shifts. Apply in person 
1531 N 10th. No phone 
its please. 

SO LONG Saloon Now 
hiring waitresses Apply in 
person. 1130 More. Man- 
hattan, KS 




TECHNICAL SUPPORT 
positions available tot K- 
State student with a vari- 
ety ol skills Must have 
good Interpersonal prob- 
lem solving skills Expen- 
ence with PCs and popu- 



auch is Microsoft 
Microsoft Excel, WordPer- 
fect. Ous tiro Pro and Win- 
dows applications de- 
sired Must hav* under- 
standing of Microsoft Win- 
dows and Dos Com- 
mands. Windows network- 
ing and computer hard- 
ware knowledge pre- 
ferred Applications avail- 
able/ accepted through Fn- 
day. November 17, 2006, 
in21l Umberger Hal. (De- 
partment of Communica- 
tions, Information & Edu- 
cational Technology ) 
TRAINER CiVl6PLUS ,. 
the nations I**ji*tsj 
provider ol city, county 
and school websites 
This full-time position in- 
volves training end -users 
al both our Manhattan of- 
fice as well as at our cftent 
sites across the US Posi- 
tion requires the ability to 
speak In front of small 
group* and a good under- 
standing ol MS Word. 
Benefits include health, 
dental, paid holidays, paid 
vacation and 401 (k) 
matching Email resume 
In Microsoft Word or text 
lormat to JobaOcMcplus - 
com 

TUTOR: RILEY County 
High School (USD 378) is 
accepting applications lor 
a tutor lor structured 
study/ at nsk students. 
$10-12/ hour Contact 
Becky Putt/ at 

bpulli@usd378.org or 
785-485-4000 as soon aa 



VARNEY'S BOOK Store 
is now taking applications 
tor temporary part-time 
and temporary full-lime po- 
sitions In the lextbook de- 
partment to assist with 
textbook buybock Possi- 
ble employment dates are 
Nov 28 - Dec 15 Day- 
time, evening, and week- 
end hours era available 
$6.00 pet hour Involves 
helping customers, moder- 
ate lifting, and cleaning/ 
pricing books. All posi- 
tions require diligence and 
a pleasant, servica-on 
ented attitude. Collage ex- 
perience is strongly pre- 
ferred Apply in person up- 
stairs in the Textbook 
Dept at Vamey's Book 
Store, 623 N. Manhattan 
Ave, Manhattan. KS. 
Deadline for applications 
Is Tuesday, November 21. 

WEB DESIGNER Award 
winning advertising 

agency, lmag*mak*rs. 
•Mini fun-Urn* w*b devel- 
oper' web designer Some 
training provded. Apply at 
www.wamegowork com 



Inventory 

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Call Now! 

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To pre qualify 

1 888-242- 744? 

www ROSIN V com 

An equal opportunity employer 




#1 SPRING Break Web- 
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PuJb Crawl Quick 



K-State and Aggieville go together like rum and Coke, and pub crawls are one 

of the many unofficial traditions at K-State. Dont drink? Consider going on a 

pub crawl just to laugh at your drunk friends and enjoy happy-hour eats. So get 

ready, order T-shirts and begin the crawl from one bar to the next. 



Porters Bar? 

When you waft through the Iron gates of Portert, 

look to your right, beaux then wB be someone 

mere to sen* you I beer. If Irt too crowded far 

your group inside, brave the coWwith the help of 

some ou t door heaters pr o vided by Porter s. 



Coco Botes 

Hour best bet here is t unfa of 

sangna, a mti of brandy, red wine and 

fresh-squeezed juice. 



Tanks Tavern 

route going to have to wait far ) wnexT 
pub craw* to visit this bar, becaust it is sti 

under construction. Tanks plan 
about 80 faet of bar space and will 



only island bar in Manhattan. 



RocM-BellyDeli 

Since its opening m fane 1987, 
Rock- A-B*ify has been a holspot 

day and night Popular r 
Items Include summer I 

and the Deh Buster sandwich 



Pits Blue Rib'n Barbeque 

With delicious barbecue and occasional live 

musk, a stop at Pafs will please everyone 

in your party. 



0' Wallas Alley 

The Irish might not have invented drinking, 

but they sure are good at It Such is the case at 

ffhtale y X where the Belfast Bomber provides I 

great addition to any pub-crawl experience. 



, Mie Lounge 

If you just want to It own with friends 
and hive i beer wtthc it ate traffic of other 
AggieviMe bars, Aggf Lounge is the place 
far you. 



Longhoms Saloon 

Witha large variety of performers on the' 
schedule each month, Longhoms is a great 
hangout for any country musk tan 



Risty's Last Chance Restaurant & Saloon 

Rj dwdastheNo. 1 2 spcctsL^mArnerKa by Sports ihusttated, Last 
Q >nce also features something ether bars do not a non-smokmg 
a ibfchnerit. terys fen Door, tosty^ Out^ 
Shje, which sefc merchandise, are also available 

•mi 

Origirvaly the Shamrock Tavern, Kite's was renamed 
Although it's seen a variety of owners, ifs been an 
i ever since If you're teaby thirsty, try a 
cor 



in 1954. 

pdraK 

a 100-Miice 



PJSBar 

for those who want to listen to the best local 
bands. Pi's is the place to go. 



Fat's Bar and Grill 

This 6 the home of the Fish 
Bow), rf you have a large group, 
you might want to try the Fish 
Tar*, he literally a fish tank 
filled with a mned drink. Gather 
up some straws, and If you drink 
n fast enough, you might get 
;reur picture on the waL 




Pub Crawl Pledge: 



We, the members of 



pledge to drag ourselves to the 
establishments listed below by 



Signed, 



Travel 



minutes will be spent at each of 



the following locations: 
1. 


From 


to 


2. 


* 




: to : 


3. 


Prom 


to 


4. 




Prom 


to 


5. 


From 


;_ to ;_ 


6. 


- 


Prom 


to 


7 


Prom 


to : 


8. 


Prom 
9. 


to 


Prom . 


to 


10. 



Prom: 




Off the field Page 2 1 Bitter rivalry Page 6 | Lessons learned Page 6 1 Jon Cornish Page 7 1 5 Keys to Victory Page 8 



\ 



f 



Page 2 



GAME DAY 



Friday, Nov. 17,2006 



Gameday forecast 




Mostly sunny 

High: 58 Low: 27 



K-State at Kansas 

2:30 p.m. Saturday 

History: Kansas leads series 61-37-5 
TV/Radio: Fox Sports Net/K-State Sports Network 



Player to watch 

Lewi Paltun a talal is tht Ni i 1 
running hatk on ihc ikfth chart tt«c 

SalurdavspnK'.rHil dun'l hi'iur 
pfi*d toW .i l»l nl lame* Johnson 

|-.\px'l K St jtc lo M Kirisjs rush 
defense, ranked 22nd nalwnalrv, early 

on hriitrc going to its atrial attack 




tffthe Field 

with Antwon Moore 



By Scott Girard 
KANSASSTATECrXLtGIAN 



Antwon Moore is one of five players 
to transfer to K-State from Northeastern 
Oklahoma ASM College this year. The 
sophomore linebacker from Ponca City, 
Okla., had his best game against Iowa 
State when he tallied eight of his sea- 
son total of 20 tackles. Although many 
people might not know his name, Moore 
might have the number most recogniz- 
able to K-State fans - 43. He recently an- 
swered questions about his special bond 
with the linebacker corp, who has the 
best nickname on the team and more. 

Q. Is there any music you like to listen 
to before a game? 

A. Mainly I like to listen a lot of rap. 
There is some rap that you probably never 
heard of. I like to listen to Brother Lynch, 
some C Bo, among others. Those are the 
ones that get me real pumped up. 

Q. What was It like having all of those 
other players come from Northeastern 



Oklahoma A*M with you? 

A. It is real relaxing and comforting 1 
enjoy having them with me Whenever I 
found out all of them were coming with 
me, I wouldn't have to be so worried 
about making too many other friends be- 
cause I already had friends coming with 
me. It's real nice to know they are with 
me. 

Q. Can you explain the bond that has 
formed between the linebacker! here? 
A. The bond that I have with the line- 
backers is like 1 have known them all my 
life. Archer and I joke around all of the 
time, and Rolo - Justin Roland - is like a 
brother to me The rest of them - we all 
just have fun together. 

Q. Who has the best nickname on the 
team and why? 

A: josh Freeman's is Michael Jackson, 
because he looks like Michael Jackson 

Q. Do you have any hobbies not 
usually seen in a football 
player? 



A. Well, I put together older cars I buy 
them from the junkyard, fix them up 
and sell them. My favorite is Chevy. I 
put together three Monte Carlos, one 78 
Monte Carlo and two '79 Monte Carlos 
1 have got another project, It's a 71 Ca- 
price Classic. It is a convertible, it's black 
with white leather, and 1 just do it from 
the ground up I do the body work, inte- 
rior, motor and all that. 

Q. What is your favorite football mov- 
ie? 

A. "Remember the Titans" Actually, 
"Gridiron Gang," the new one that just 
came out. That is my favorite, because it 
is based on a true story. Those based on 
real life are the movies that really inter- 
est me. 



~~M Last weekend's 45 point 
~W victory over Texas speaks 
Hf | for itself. Quarterback I osh 
Freeman is terrorizing 
defenses, throwing for more than 
250 yards in each of the Wildcats' 
last two games. Additionally, run- 
ning back Leon Paltnn is proving 
he can come through in the clutch 
with a big run or by completing a 
pass of his own. 



The Kansas offense 
definitely has been its 
strong suit this season. 
Senior running back 
Jim Cornish leads the Big 12 
Conference in rushing this season 
with 1,130 yards. Additionally, 
freshman quarterback Kerry 
Meier had an efficient game in 
last weekend's 41-10 thrashing of 
Iowa State. 



DEFENSE 




~W\ Despite the 42 points 
Wm given up I o the Long h o rn \ 
He—Jlast week, the K-State 
defense actually played 
pretty well. The Longhoms were 
held below their season average 
of 407 yards of total offense, and 
quarterback lrs.ni Snead was 
sacked five times. If the Wildcats 
can get some pressure on the 
inexperienced Meier, it might be 
enough to rattle him for the rest 
of the game. 



Fortunately for K 
State, Kansas' defense 
has the same weakness 
Texas had last weekend 
—defending against the pass. 
Kansas ranks last in the Big 12 
in pass defense, allowing more 
than 260 yards per game. The 
Jay hawk rush defense is signifi- 
cantly better, but it should seem 
paltry in comparison to the rush 
defense K-State encountered last 
weekend against the Longhoms. 



SPECIAL TEAMS 



f\ Last weekend's win can 
'^M be attributed largely to 
l^r I some key special teams 
plays. Yam on I ignr-. 
52-yard punt return. gave K Male 
much- needed breathing room, 
and leff Snodgrass' 51 -yard field 
goal with 3:19 remaining sealed 
the game for the Wildcats. If the 
special teams can come up big 
again against Kansas, it should 
be enough to ensure a Wildcat 
victory. 



Much like K-State, 
Kansas has the luxury of 
gifted kickott and punt 
return men. The Jayhawks 
are averaging 21 yards per kick- 
off return and almost 15 yards 
per punt return. Unfortunately 
for Kansas, junior kicker Scott 
Webb has been abysmal lately, 
converting just one of hiv last four 
field-goal attempts. Webb's poor 
form might spell disaster for the 
Jayhawks. 



PREDICTION 



High-scoring shootout* have 
become a trend for the Wildcats 
recently. Expect the same this 
weekend when two motivated 
teams clash at Memorial Stadium 
in Lawrence. A win for Kansas 
assures it bowl eligibility, while 
a victory for the Wildcats could 



mean a trip lo the Alamo Bowl. 
Expect coaches and players on 
both sides to pull out all the stops 
in this one and give fans a game 
to remember. Freeman's hot hand 
continues, and K- Stale wins a 
thriller. 
K State 38, Kansas 28 



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Friday, Nov, 17, 2006 



GAMEDAY 



Page 3 



Homegrown talent 



K-State program bucks trend, 

building team on walk-ons 

raised, taught to play in Kansas 



By Jonathan Garten 
KANSAS SWE COLLEGIAM 

The story of a walk-on 
football player is one 
of an underdog. 

Walk-ons work every bit 
as hard as - if not harder 
than - scholarship players to 
be part of the team 

The difference is thai they 
don't receive the same perks. 
Walk-ons just do what they 
can to help their team with 
the hope that one day they 
will earn a scholarship. 

That goal keeps them fo- 
cused until they are rewarded 
with one of their team's 85 
scholarship spots Sophomore 
defensive end Ian Campbell, 
who received a scholarship 
after last spring's practices, 
remembers what it took to 
earn one of those spots. 

"That drive is definitely 
there," Campbell said 



"It means that much more 
to you when you gel that 
check every month, and you 
gel your books and tuition 
paid for." 

Although rare at many 
schools, the story of a walk 
on turned scholarship player 
has become one often told at 
K State. Eight former or cur- 
rent walk-ons have made at 
least one start for the Wild- 
cats this season, including 
Campbell, junior wide re 
ceiver Jordy Nelson, sopho- 
more safety Andrew Erker, 
senior defensive tackle Blake 
Seiler, junior linebacker Mar- 
cus Perry, junior offensive 
lineman Jacob Voegeli, senior 
tight end Donald Kaymer and 
junior wide receiver Daniel 
Gonzalez. 

In comparison, most of 
the other universities in the 
Big 12 Conference have not 
started nearly as many walk 




Catrina Rawson | . Qtl EGIAN 
A formar walk-on, defensive end Ian Campbell ranks 1 2th nationally 
and tops the Big 12 Conference with his 1 45 tackle-for-loss average. 
His sack last week against Texas gave him 1 1 .5 for the season, tying the 
school record set by Nyle Wiren in 1996. 




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Safety Andrew Erker, a walk-on from Olathe, Kan., has received plenty of playing time this season with the 
loss of starting safety Marcus Watts. Erker has started in six games for K-State this year and has 30 tackles. 



ons as K Stale has this year. 
Colorado comes closest with 
six former or current walk- 
ons all making starts on its 
offense, which ranks at the 
bottom of the conference in 
scoring and total yards. 

Some walk-ons might 
never earn a scholarship, de- 
spite making it onto the field. 
Voegeli, who made three 
starts last year and one start 
this year, still carries walk-on 
status, but he said making the 
starting line-up is the biggest 
reward. 

"It's nice being on the 
team and being able to run 
out with the team, but it's 
even better going on the field 
and playing," Voegeli said. 

All eight of the current or 
former walk-ons who made 
starts for K-State this season 
are from Kansas, a place not 
typically known for produc- 
ing high-profile athletes like 
Texas is. 

According to Rivals. emu's 
class of 2007 football rank- 
ings, Kansas' top two players 
are rated as four-star pros- 
pects. 

However, Texas is home to 



five five-star recruits and 15 
four -star players. 

"It's kind of hard being 
from Kansas to get looked at 
by schools," Seiler said. "Some 
of the guys from around here 
just aren't fully developed in 
high school." 

Brian Gates, a Rivals.com 
recruiting editor, said one rea- 
son players like Campbell and 
Nelson are not offered schol- 
arships out of high school is 
because Kansas players do 
not get as much training as 
players from other states. 

According to the Kansas 
State High School Activities 
Association's 2006 handbook. 
coaches are only allowed to 
schedule practice between 
the opening and ending of the 
regular season. A coach also 
is allowed one non -con tact 
voluntary camp during the 
summer 

The manual for Texas high 
school football, sel by the 
University I ntersch elastic 
League, allows teams to use 
a 60 minute class period dur- 
ing the off-season to practice 
Coaches in class 4A or 5A 
can schedule 18 spring prac- 



tices within a 30-day period. 

"1 think Kansas is behind 
in developing players because 
of the limitations put on by 
state rules," Gates said "With 
other players getting extra 
training, it may take a year 
or two for a Kansas player to 
catch up" 

Over the years, several 
Kansas walk-ons have writ- 
ten their own success stories 
at K-State, but perhaps none 
were as successful as Man 
hattan native Jon McGraw, 
who played for the Wildcats 
in 1997 2001. McGraw went 
from walk-on to starter to 
All- Big 12 honors and now 
plays defensive back for the 
Detroit Lions, 

Raymer said it was stories 
like McGraw's that drew him 
to K State. 

"When I came up here, 
people told me to just keep 
working hard because other 
walk-ons were successful, 



Top 5 K-State walk-ons 
In the past 20 years 

1. Safety Jon McGraw 

Pljywf 1997 2001 
From; Manhattan 

■ Named third-team AH-Biq 12 m 
3001 

• Drafted by the New York lets in 
2002 

■ Now plays for the Detroit Irons 

2, Defensive end Ian Campbell 
Played: 20O4-pr«ent 

from: Cimarron, Kan. 

■ Earned a scholarship bit spring 

■ Leads the Big 1 J in tackles (or loss 
with 16 

■ Tied for the K-State smote- season 
sack record of 11.5 

) , Wide receiver Jordy Nelson 

Played: 200J-pre»nt 
From: Riley, Kan. 

■ Converted to wide receiver trom 
defensive bad In spring 2005 

■ Named second leam All Big 12 
by The Kansas City Star and received 
honorable mention from the coaches 
and The Associated Press 

■ led the Wildcats in catches (45), 
receiving yards (669) and receiving 
touchdowns (JJ) in 2005 

4. Defensive end Joe Bob 
Clements 

Ptayed: 1994-1998 
From: Emporia, Kan. 

■ Played on five bowl team, 

■ Named AH Big 12 Conference 
honorable mention In 1998 

■ Coached at K-State in 1999 2005 

5. Wide receiver Mitch Running 
Played: 199MW5 

From: Decorah, Iowa 

■ Ranks fourth on K -State's all-time 
receptions list with HI 

■ Ranks sixth on K- State's all-time 
receiving yards list with 1,821 

■ Was part of former coac h B<l I 
Snyder's first bowl team 

— Compiled by Jonathan Garten 

and 1 thought about it, and I 
took it to heart," Raymer said 
"1 kept working, and coach 
(Ron) Prince gave me an op- 
portunity, and it's paid oil' 



discover 




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Lawrence 

Where to stay, eat, relax before and after watching K-State 
play Kansas in the last regular-season game 




mim^am 



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ing for good beet, cheap prim or some tnttnomment, 
ycvwwl be dtst^rrted marry of these sefeawm. 

Abe a Mart Las** (Pictured below) 
(D^^O^bTby Kara ttudtob in 2002. 
Known natonatyfcr having i flwmg Influence on *e 
music industr*. Abe & Jaktt ta been host to music talent 
like iohn Mjjkt «nd OAR, before they got their big crate. 
Where: SE Sixth St 
Mmw:f785)M1-S8S5 

Red Lyon Tavern 

A comfortable European style pub - a terrific 

f\) place to reiax and catch some games on TV. 

Sltoot some darts, en)oy a variety of ales and 

munch on some free popcorn. 

Where: <H4 Massachusetts St 

Phew: (785)832-8228 

Louise's Downtown 
A spacious two-floor bar, with the upstairs 
©opening at 1 1 aim. Louises has daily drink 
soeclals and live musk on Saturdays. Louise's 
■ %s,i heated smoking area to customers 
1 remember, Lawrence has a smoking ban) 
Where: 1009 Massachusetts St. 
Phone: (785) 843 9032 





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tions avaDabk — especially if you an witting 
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(785)842-7030 
h-to: Rates start at SaO/night 
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Qliy—it Inn | SeHts 
Where: 740 Iowa St 
Phont: (877) 224-6668 
Price: Rates start at $69.98/mght 
Features: 3 miles from KU campus, indoor 
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© Super 8 Motel -De Soto, Km. 

Where: 34085 Commerce Drive 
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,: Din *nd Chris Mumrru of Dlgflnm, Kan. 

■ VMr/ttoM Short sdtod bis 

■ War purple and sHwr 

■ tt*j0tto2OO3 
Unknown, because the odometer doesn't work 

• Fettaws: Bencti seating along the two sides, «tra batteries to aMowfcr 
the u» of a mtcrowiwarK] multiple Crock- ^ 
emNawned with the name ofafl tr» bowl games to which It has trawled tn 
each of the window. The wafc and cettog hsldea«a)«wr»dwtthtiK signa- 
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ft Coil: $500, though Dan Mummis sister, Vickie James, said she estimates 
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than Manhattan, but James said the previous owners took it to wwnl bowl 
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The Cat Cruiser has a history of supporting K-State 
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which K-State participated, James said. 

James said the bus hasn't traveled to any away games 
since then, but for every home game, it makes the four- 
hour trip from Dlghton to the west parking lot of Snyder 
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"It's a great way to get a iot of people together who don't 
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lames said the family has welcomed countless visitors 
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and family members always have guests sign the inside of 
the bus before leaving. 

■'Iff not pretty, it's not fancy, but we've served (all sorts) 
of people," lames said. "It's just fun." 



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I12.0C 



Page 6 



GAMEDAY 



Friday, Nov. 17, 2006 



Bitter rivalry 

K-State can keep Mark Mangino, Kansas out of bowl contention 



By Nick Dunn 

KANSAS HMECOUiGIAN 

You don't have to worry about K- 
Btatt defensive end Ian Camp- 
Ml gelling ready for this week's 
Sunflower Showdown against Kansas. 

Campbell is one of the many play- 
ers on K Stall- 's rosier from the state 
uf Kansas (he's from Cimarron), and 
In- said he'll have no trouble avoiding a 
letdown after last week's stunning 45- 
42 upsei of Texas. 

"I've never been a KU fan," Camp 
bell said "I can say thai That's as far 
as I'll get into that detail. 

"1 can't say I haven't cheered for 
them in basketball from time to time, 
because you want your conference to 
do better and look good, but I definitely 
don't have any KU pride - just K-State 
pride" 

Senior tight end Donald Raymer, a 
native of Goudland. Kan . has to wor- 
ry about bragging rights every time he 
goes back home for the holidays. 

Raymer's former high school bas- 
ketball coach is a huge Kansas fan and 
makes sure to rub it in Raymer's face if 
i he |ay hawks come out on top in foot 
kill 

"I jusl like to go home on vacations 
md be like. Hey. what was the score 



of that game?'" Raymer said. "A couple 
years ago, he got to laugh over the holi- 
days when I went home, and 1 don't 
want to have that ever happen again." 

For years, the Sunflower State ri- 
valry wasn't much of a showdown. The 
Wildcats dominated during the Bill 
Snyder era, winning 1 1 in a row until 
the Jayhawks won 31-28 in Lawrence 
in 2004. 

Now the bad blood is back, and the 
games have more implications than 
ever 

KU enters this year'* contest with 
a 5-5 record, meaning the team needs 
one more win to become bowl-eligible 
for the second year in a row - a feat the 
program never has accomplished. 

Ironically, the Jayhawks* final two 
games are against their two most- hated 
rivals - K State and Missouri. KU clos- 
es out t lie-season by going to Columbia, 
Mo., to face the Tigers on Nov. 25. 

K-State has its bowl bid all but sealed 
up, and Ihc possibility of keeping Kan- 
sas from going to a bowl is something 
senior defensive tackle Quintin Echols 
wants to take advantage of. 

"You jusl want to play spoiler," Echols 
said "The last few years, we were in a 
position where we needed one or two 
wins to get to a bowl game We know 
how bad that feels, so we want to make 



somebody else feel that bad." 

Growing up in Leawood, Kan., a 
suburb of the greater Kansas City area, 
senior kicker Jeff S nod grass 
became familiar with this 
rivalry. 

His father at- 
tended and coached 
at K-State, but his 
mother went to medi 
cal school at KU. The 
"rift,'' as Snodgrass 
calls it, is so evident the 
family has stones with 
both logos on them in their 
front yard, 

Moat of Snodgrass' 
friends at Rockhurst 
High School were fay- 
hawk fans and now at- 
tend Kansas, so the kicker 
have a lot of friends and 
watching him in Lawrence. 

Kansas is favored to beat K 
State, but that doesn't matter to 
Campbell. 

"If KU's the favorite, whatev- 
er," Campbell said. "We've been 
picked to lose before. I don't 
care. 1 know what's going to hap- 
pen when we go to KU, and I'm 
not worried about it. We'll just let 
the scoreboard tell the tale." 




Copy chief learns about West Coast offense, quarterback styles 




Confession: I'm not really 
a football fan. 

However, after reading 10 
Gameday 
see I ions 
cover to 
cover. I'm 
at least 
twice the 
fan I was in 
August. 

Under- 
standing 
the game 

is crucial lo enjoying it, and 
this semester has been my 
period of football enlighten- 
ment, lhanks to the Col- 
legian sports staff Here are 
some of my "Aha!" moments: 

1. Who knew there was 
a difference between punier 
Tim Rvycr and kicker (eff 



ABBY 
BROWNBACK 



Snodgrass' jobs? They both 
seem to do the same thing: 
apply a foot to the ball to 
send it sailing. 

2. The Cover-2 defense 
calls for the Wildcat back- 
field to be split into five sec- 
lions, with two players even 
further back. 

I'm still not sure how this 
helps or hurts, but our de- 
fense has been highly praised 
this season. 

3. The West Coast offense 
coach Ron Prince brought to 
K-State is the same offense 
Nebraska runs, but it's a 

bit more successful for the 
Huskers, as they beat K- 
State21-3onOct. 13 

4. When a quarterback 
is labeled "dual-threat," it 
means he can throw and run 



the ball, like Tennessee Titan 
Vince Young. However, a 
"pro-style" quarterback is 
like Josh Freeman - he's 
mainly a thrower. 

5. Apparently, it is pos- 
sible to learn to play Divi- 
sion- 1A football with Mad- 
den NFL video games, a la 
defensive end Moses Manu. 

These are obvious, com- 
,mon sense bits of informa- 
tion to your average football 
fan, but I am not your aver- 
age football fan. 

Until this season, I knew 
probably as much about 
badminton as I did about 
football Now, however, I 
can appreciate football for 
the thought- and finesse-re- 
quiring sport it it. 

Before, it was an unin- 



teresting sport 1 was forced 
to watch every fall and then 
again sometime in January, 
praising God the season fi- 
nally ended. The games were 
too long, and the action 
wasn't as intense or as swift 
as basketball. 

Now, I can comment 
semi-intelligently on a 
game 1 watched all the way 
through. 1 know at least a 
little about many of K- State's 
top players - like the fact 
that defensive tackle Quintin 
Echols has a daughter or 
that safety Marcus Watts is 
"simply irreplaceable." 

And I have to admit, 1 felt 
almost naked - despite my 
five layers of clothing - at 
last Saturday's game against 
Texas, because 1 hadn't copy 



edited the Gameday section 
that week 

1 didn't know Longhom 
quarterback Colt McCoy's 
style or statistics, not that 
cither rrfattered. because Mc- 
Coy was injured right off the 
bat, 1 didn't know our "keys 
to victory," but clearly the 
team did And 1 didn't know 
the story behind Texas coach 
Mack Brown's long struggle 
to earn the backing of Texas 
fans 

It's amazing how a little 
knowledge of how a sport 
works can greatly enhance 
your enjoyment of it. Now 
that I know there is more to 
this rough-and-tumble game 
than trying to run the ball 
toward the end of the field 
while avoiding a dog pile of 



guys who weigh more than 
200 pounds, I find myself 
- quite strangely - drawn to 
it. 



Abby Brown back it a fun lot in print 
journalism. Pltat tend comments la 
ipotti Aipub. km. tdu. 



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Friday, Nov. 17,2006 



GAMEDAY 



Page? 




PHOTO COURIER KANSAS iPOdlS INFORMATION 

ton Cornish's 1 1 3-yard average per game is lops in the Big 1 2 Conference. This season, Cornish has 1 ,1 30 
yards rushing, 1 76 yards receiving and six touchdowns. 

Hard-running Cornish to pose 
problems for K-State on Saturday 

ByCedriqueFlemming Jones, the University of Virgin- might think," senior defen- 



By Cedrique Flemming 
KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

|on Cornish is one of the 
best running backs in the Big 
12 Conference this season. 

The senior is the ninth 
leading rusher in the country, 
and his 113-yard average per 
game is tops in the confer- 
ence. 

Cornish has rushed for 
more than 100 yards in six 
of the ) ay hawks games this 
season and will look to notch 
No. 7 - which would put 
him alone in first place in the 
conference in 100 -yard rush- 
ing performances this season 
- when he lines up against K 
State on Saturday. 

"1 think this running back, 
No. 29 (Cornish), is terrific," 
coach Ron Prince said "He 
reminds me a lot of Thomas 



Jones, the University of Virgin- 
ia running back that is playing 
for the Chicago Bears. This is 
a very good team that we are 
going to face This team is a 
big, strong team, and I'm very 
impressed with them." 

This season, Cornish has 
1,130 yards rushing and 176 
yards receiving, and he has 
scored six touchdowns. He is 
second in the conference this 
season in average all-purpose 
yards per game with 130.6. 

His season highs in both 
rushing yards and touch- 
downs came Oct 21 in a 36- 
35 loss to Baylor when he 
rushed for 196 yards and two 
touchdowns. 

"He's surprisingly fast. 
You see him, and you prob 
ably don't think he has much 
speed, but from what I've 
seen, he's faster than what you 



might think," senior defen- 
sive lineman Quintin Echols 
said. "He's a hard runner. Of 
course, he probably has a few 
moves, but I think he prides 
himself on running hard " 

Cornish is part of a Kansas 
offense that is eighth in the Big 
12, averaging 29.2 points per 
game The J ay hawks average 
381.2 yards of total offense 
per game, which includes 171 
yards rushing and 210.2 yards 
passing All of these averages 
are ranked seventh in the con- 
ference. 

"(Beating Texas) was awe- 
some, but we've got to move 
on," quarterback Josh Free 
man said. "Kansas is a good 
team, and they've hung in 
with a lot of good teams this 
year. We know that they're 
going to play us tight, so we 
just have to get ready." 




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5 Collegian vs. KSDB 91 .9 

Games to watch 



Collegian football picks 








Team record; 150-70 El 


|G| 


lf>l 


161 


EState retort: 27-17 


LrJ 




faj 


M(dftynii(«IS! 


■WJI 

huullun C*rt*n (» l») 


■art 

tai>««MMk|ini} 


<«fft«jllit»()7 1«t 


K-Stattat K-State 


K-State 


K-State 


Kansas 


Kansas 38 34 


3S-24 


28-24 


24-21 


Oklahoma State at Oklahoma State 


Oklahoma State 


Oklahoma State 


Texas Tech 


Texas Tech MJS 


4S-35 


35-31 


44-40 


No. 2 Michigan at OhtoState 
Nal Ohio State 31 M 


Michigan 


Ohio State 
17-16 


Ohio State 
17-7 


No. 17 California at DSC 


DSC 


use 


use 


No. 4 Southern California 22-19 


21-20 


27-20 


35-20 


No. 19 Virginia Tech at Maryland 


Maryland 


Maryland 


Virginia Tech 


No. 14 Maryland 20-10 


2417 


24-21 


24-6 



KSDB 91.9 football picks 



Team record: 16* 52 
K-State record: 34-10 






Xnth Ftimlin I4M2) 


KyttrMtf{4]-M) 


sonWkfWit) 


iMMtWwthf 14114) 


K-State at 
Kansas 

Oklahoma State at 
Texas Tech 


K-State 

31-21 

Oklahoma State 

34-31 


K-State 
31-20 

Texas Tech 
45-35 


K-State 
34-20 

Texas Tech 
37-34 


K State 

77-0 

Oklahoma State 
35-34 


K& 2 Michigan at 
No. 1 0hio State 


Ohio State 
24-17 


Michigan 
31-28 


Ohio State 
28-27 


Ohio State 
34-31 


No 17 California at 
No. 4 Southern California 


use 

28-21 


use 

21-17 


use 

44-30 


use 

45-37 


No. 19 Virginia Tech at 

No. 14 Maryland 


Maryland 
21-18 


Maryland 
27-17 


Maryland 
21-17 


Virginia Tech 
17-13 



Collegian didn't give KSDB a challenge 



By Anthony Mandoza 

KANSAS S1A1EC0LLIGIAN 

It was a good idea until 
about the fourth week into 
the season 

That's when KSDB 91.9 
went on a unprecedented run 
led by sports editor Kyle Pin- 
ley to put an end to the picks 
competition. 

When 1 met Finley to first 
discuss the Collegian sports 
staff taking on the KSDB 
91.9 sports staff in a weekly 
battle of the sports superior, 
never did 1 think we would be 
losing by such a large margin 
come the end of the season. 

Maybe it is my fault for my 



selection of people to repre- 
sent the Collegian, or maybe, 
just maybe, we should not 
have taken our mantra from 
football coach Ron Prince 
and taken the "bold and dar 
ing" picks, only to have them 



backfire time after time. 

Unfortunately, the season 
has ended, and the Collegian 
must concede victory to 91.9. 

It was fun while it lasted, 
but. like most losing teams 
say, "Wait 'til next year." 



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Paged 



GAMEDAY 



Friday, Nov. 17,2006 



Offensive line builds 
depth, confidence 



BySconGirard 

KANSAS STATE COUWIAN 

After weeks of different line- 
ups and disappointing results, 
the carousel of different of- 
fensive linemen has started to 
please coach Ron Prince. 

Throughout the season 
Prince said he expects much out 
of the offensive line. Although 
the line has not yet met his ex- 
pectations, Prince said it is de 
veloping into a better unit. 

"1 think they are getting clos- 
er," Prince said. "1 think we're 
starting to see accumulated 
depth and starting to see evi- 
dence of coaching, so I am very 
pleased about that" 

The players know they are 
not meeting Prince's expecta- 
tions and they could be taken 
from or moved into a starting 



role any week. This has pro- 
duced two of the most impor- 
tant components of an offensive 
line - competition and depth. 

"As far as developing depth, 
the guys that have started and 
aren't now are always willing to 
help out," junior guard Logan 
Robinson said. "It's a whole 
collective thing of helping ev- 
eryone out." 

Prince has started seven 
combinations of linemen, with 
1 1 different starters overall. 

Senior Greg Wafford is 
the only lineman to start ev- 
ery game, but even he hasn't 
remained at the same posi- 
tion Wafford started the first 
four games at guard and then 
switched to tackle 

Wafford is not the only play- 
er to play at different positions 
along the line. Michael Prieson 



ir*rs 



COLORADO (f-Oc 7 GUEST I IUS Tg*ir I 



*•&*>! 



Catrini Rawton | COLLEGIAN 

Th« offensive tin* has allowed only seven sacks In the last three games. In losses to Missouri and Nebraska earlier this season, quarterback Josh 
Freeman was sacked eight times in both games combined. 



and Nick Stringer both have 
started at right and left tackle, 
and fohn Hafferty and Brad 
Rooker have practiced at sev- 
eral positions on the line. 



"It's really helped a lot be- 
ing able to know different po- 
sitions," Robinson said "It also 
helped being able to do more 
for the team" 



The line is beginning to mesh 
at seemingly the right time. Last 
week against Texas, the line 
protected Freeman and allowed 
only one sack to one of the na- 



tion's best defensive fronts. 

"I think we're finally starting 
to mesh a little more at the of- 
fensive line position," Robinson 
said. 



5 Keys to Victory 



K-State must listen to coordinator Franklin to avoid letdown against KU 



By Austin Mart 

KANSAS STATE (OtLMIAN 

The Texas win is ancient 
history as far as the Wildcats 
are concerned They now turn 
their attention east, to a Kan- 
sas team fighting for bowl eli- 
gibility. Here's what K-State 
must do to claim bragging 
rights in the Sunflower Show- 
down and deliver a blow to 
Kansas' postseason aspira- 
tions 

1. NO TEXAS LETDOWN 

Given the opponent, K- 
State probably won't overlook 
this game. Still, the Wildcats 



can't come out flat or over- 
confident against a Kansas 
team playing for bowl eligibil- 
ity. 

2. STAY GROUNDED 

K-State should be able to 
throw against the (ayhawks, 
who rank 117th in the na- 
tion against the pass. Still, the 
Wildcats can't abandon the 
run - this offense is at its best 
when running backs [ames 
fohnson and Leon Patton get 
plenty of touches. 

3. THE FULL NELSON 

If Yamon Pigurs can't play, 
K-State will need a big game 



from junior wide receiver 
lordy Nelson. Nelson and 
quarterback Josh Freeman are 
still perfecting their chemistry, 
but the Riley County product 
delivers big catches when the 
Wildcats need them most. 
He'll need a few on Saturday. 

4. SLOW DOWN THE 
CANADIAN COMET 

Kansas running back Jon 
Cornish, a native of New 
Westminster, British Colum- 
bia, leads the Big 12 Confer- 
ence in rushing With Kansas' 
quarterback situation uncer- 
tain, Cornish will get the ball 
early and often on Saturday 



5. TAP THE FRANKLIN 
MINT 

Offensive coordinator 

James Franklin's play calling 



has been marvelous during 
K-State's three-game winning 
streak. He's been able to mix 
the run and the pass, finding 
the right play at the right time 



to get K-Stale into the end 
zone If Franklin calls anoth- 
er good game, K-State should 
put up plenty of points against 
Kansas' mediocre defense. 



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INSIDE 

Josh Freeman 
turned over the 
ball 6 times in 
K-State's loss. 

So* story P»g« 6 



it 



w ww.kst at ecollegian . com 



Monday, November 20, 2006 



Vol II I. No 66 



Holiday 
alternatives 





Photos by Christopher HaiMwtnckal | COLLEGIA* 
Mogan Schmidt freshman in open option, takes a piece of pie during the Thanksgiving dinner in Derby Dining Center. In addition to turkey and ham, 
students had many options of the dessert. 

Students celebrate Thanksgiving in dining centers, with friends' families or not at all 



By Kristin Hodges 
HAMAS SUIKOlLKIAN 

For the Thanksgiving holiday, 
many will travel home to sit 
down with family and eat 
a traditional Thanksgiving meal. 
However, some observe the holiday 
in other ways 

AN OBSERVATION, BUT NO 
CELEBRATION 

Lenka Hadamova did not grow 
up celebrating Thanksgiving. The 
only thing to which she said she 
could compare the traditional 
American dinner is a classic Christ- 
mas dinner, when her family gathers 
together to eat fried carp and potato 
salad 

However, when Hadamova came 
to the United States from Moravia, 
Czech Republic, in 2003, she experi- 



enced her first Thanksgiving dinner. 
but she described it as a religious 
experience 

Hadamova, graduate student in 
education and English as a Second 
Language, said she and her husband 
were invited to a Thanksgiving din- 
ner, but they did not realize if was at 
a church. 

"The first experience was praying 
before the dinner, which was quite 
weird to me," she said. "You don't 
want to offend anybody, because it 
is a big thing, and you don't know 
what to do." 

She said the experience was 
strange, because there are a lot of 
atheists in the Czech Republic, and 
people are not raised learning or 
talking about religion, including her 
mother, who opposed religion and 
church. 

Hadamova said the meal consist- 



ed of turkey, mashed potatoes and 
sweet potatoes. 

"lit was) quite weird, because we 
don't have them," she said. "It was 
fust a lot of food." 

During the meal, Hadamova 
said she heard people talking about 
church and thinking in the perspec- 
tive of community. 

"I think 1 was really pleased with 
the community system," she said 
"You have a lot of people that you 
don't know anything about, but you 
can be with them around the table." 

However, after her first Thanks- 
giving, Hadamova and her husband 
decided to spend the next holidays 
traveling instead of celebrating. She 
said the day seemed more like a day 
off from work 

"If you do not have the tradition, 
one year is enough to observe," she 
said. 



This Thanksgiving Hadamova 
and her husband will travel again. 
They are visiting a friend in Chicago 
who is married to an American, and 
they will eat a Thanksiving dinner 
Hadamova said the dinner will in- 
clude a prayer before the meal. 

"As long as nobody makes me 
feel weird about it, I'm fine," she 
said. 

Hadamova said she does not plan 
to celebrate Thanksgiving every 
year. To her, it seems like there are a 
lot of holidays similar to Christmas 
in the United States. 

"Don't ask me how I'm going 
to explain to my children someday 
why we don't celebrate Thanksgiv- 
ing," she said "I don't know how 
you could celebrate it without grow- 
ing up with it." 

Sec THANKSGIVING Pages 



Thanksgiving meal can be enjoyed in moderation 



tyEmHyHaug 
KANSAS STAIf COILIOIAN 

Thanksgiving - the holiday filled 
with food, family, football and more 
food Overeating during the holidays 
has become just as much a tradition 
as the annual football game, drawing 
more attention to the obesity epidemic 
facing the United States. 

Concerns about obesity have ris- 
en the past years About 127 million 
Americans are overweight, and more 
than 60 million are obese, according 
to the American Obesity Association 

One factor that has attributed to 
the increase is overeating 



"People overeat for a number of 
reasons," said Dianna Schalles, nutri- 
tionist at Lafene Health Center "The 
constant exposure to food in our cul- 
ture: the vast array of foods to choose 
from, the fast food convenience factor, 
marketing dollars aimed towards our 
appetites, and last but not least, we eat 
for emotional reasons that don't have 
anything to do with physical survival " 

Aside from weight gain, overeating 
can lead to long-term problems like 
diabetes, hypertension, heart disease 
and some forms of cancer 

"Obesity is a serious problem," 
Isaac Specht, sophomore in political 
science, said "My grandmother has 



diabetes and went into congestive 
heart failure earlier this year because 
of her obesity. I've seen what obesity 
can do to a person, so 1 know just how 
much of a problem it is." 

During the holidays, many people 
are compelled to eat more food be- 
cause of stress, emotions and other 
personal factors, but there are ways to 
have a healthy Thanksgiving 

Schalles said a weU- portioned 
Thanksgiving meal includes 3-4 ounc- 
es of turkey, 1/2 cup of potatoes, 1/2 
cup of stuffing, 1/4 cup of gravy, 1/2 
cup of green beans and one slice of 
pumpkin pie equivalent to a slice of 
pizza. After the meal, people should 



take a walk to bum excess calories. 

While the Thanksgiving meal often 
is large, Maureen Ty, sophomore in 
microbiology, said she is not worried 
about her holiday caloric intake 

"It's a family tradition to eat a lot. If 
you don't eat, you are not a part of the 
family," Ty said 

Schalles said she encourages peo- 
ple to enjoy the holiday food, while 
stopping when they've had enough. 

"Don't rob yourself of holiday tra 
diuons," she said "If you drool over 
the turkey and trimmings but deny 
yourself the chance to enjoy in mod- 
eration, you'll likely set yourself up for 
a binge later." 



1 killed 

in Cattracker 

accident 



By Jonas Hogg 

MNSASSMtlCOUKIAN 

A man critically injured in Satur- 
day's Cattracker accident in Lawrence 
has been identified, while the name of 
the man killed in the accident has not 
yet been released 

The Saiina Journal reported Sunday 
that Chris Orr, Saiina resident and for- 
mer sports writer for the Journal, is the 
man injured in Saturday's accident 

At about 1 1 :35 a.m. Saturday, Law 
rente police were dispatched to a vehi- 
cle fatality accident at the 1700 block of 
Iowa Street, according to a Lawrence 
Police Department press release. 

The accident occurred less than 2 
miles from the University of Kansas' 
Memorial Stadium, where K-State was 
preparing to play its in -state rival. 

Bob Pottroff, owner of the Cattrack- 
er, said passengers on the bus had gone 
to the balcony on top of the bus with- 
out the driver's knowledge. To protect 
the driver's privacy, his name has not 
been released, 

Pottroff, Manhattan resident, said 
he was not present at the accident. 

"1 can't explain how badly the driv- 
er feels. He didn't know anybody had 
gone up on top of the bus He's de- 
stroyed right now," Pottroff said, 

As it is a well-known symbol of K- 
State, delivering spirited Wildcat pride 
across the nation, the effects of the Cat- 
tracker accident have reached far and 
wide, Pottroff said. 

Set ACCIDENT Past 9 

PS3 release 

triggers frenzy, 

violence 

ByMoganMoMT 

KANSAS STATE C0LLEGI AN 

The lure of a 60- GB hard drive, 
wireless controllers and chrome trim 
drove hardcore gamers to camp out 
side stores for as long as three days in 
anticipation of the release of the cov- 
eted Sony PlayStation 3 Priday 

The video game system costs $500 
to $600, depending on the size of the 
hard drive and extras like controllers. 
but some people were willing to pay 
much more. 

Shane Eslit, junior in secondary ed- 
ucation, made $ 1 ,200 j ust f or sel 1 i rig h is 
spot In line 

He said he and his girlfriend planned 
to camp out in front of a store Thursday 
evening for fun. They went to Best Buy 
and saw there were a lot of people in 
line, then went to Target, where there 
were only nine people waiting 

Eslit said he decided to leave, but 
some other people camping out con- 
vinced him to stay until morning for 
a chance at one of the six PS3s Target 
had. 

"I was 10th in Line," he said. "Six, 
seven and eight were in a group, and 
they decided to leave. The guy who was 
ninth was asleep, so the sixth guy of- 
fered to sell me his spot." 

Later, Eslit said, the man who was 
asleep offered to buy Eslit's spot, put- 
ting him sixth in line. Eslit said the man 

WPS] Ptyt 9 



Today's forecast 

Sunny 
High: 57 Low: 38 



INSIDE 



The Amazing Jonathan 

While not truly magical, Comedy Central The 
Amazing lonathan" redeems himself with humor, 
improvisational skills. 
See story Page 7 



CAMPUS NEWS HIGHLIGHTS 



No Collegian 

There will not be a Collegian 
published Tuesday because of the 
Thanksgiving holiday. The next 
edition of the Collegian will be 
published Nov. 27. The Collegian 
staff wishes all students a safe trip 
to their destinations and a happy 
Thanksgiving. 



Electronic training 

There will be training for electronic 
grade submission at i p.m. today 
at Hale Library. Instructors and 
designates must attend a sched- 
uled session or complete the on- 
line tutorial before noon on Dec. S. 
For more information, visit mam 
itoc.ki. tdu/traminq/tftmii/tgi. 



Executive committee 

Provost Duane He His has begun his 
new term as a member of the ex- 
ecutive committee of the National 
Association of State Universities 
and Land Grant Universities He 
will serve a three year term. He 
began his term at the NASULGU 
national meeting, which was Nov. 
12-14 in Houston. 



Lebanese: Hezbollah's political position has improved 

By a wide majority, I ebanese say they believe Hezbollah^ political position within 
Lebanon is now stronger as a result of the recent M-day conflict with Israel 

■ SStnmow BHWeahet % Don t know/Refused 




* 



Page 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, Nov. 20, 2006 



f Call 



776-5577 

i 

Puzzles | Eugene Sheffer 




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CAMPUS CHRONICLES 

Headlines from other universities 



U.ALABAMA BANS CLASSIC 
GAMEDAY SONG 

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. - Many 
University of Alabama students 
said they have fc It a void recent- 
ly in their game-day experience 
at Bryant-Denny Stadium, a 
void once filled with the Green 
Day song "Basket Case" 

Athletic department officials 
prohibited the Million Dollar 
Band from playing the song be- 
tween the third and fourth quar- 
ters of football games, the band's 
tradition for at least five years. 

In its place, fans now hear 
"Sweet Home Alabama." 



U. MARYLAND STUDENTS 
ADMIT ONLINE OBSESSION 

COLLEGE PARK, Md. 
- Paul Zwiers, graduate student 
in biology, said some days he 
spends eight or 10 hours cud- 
dling up to his Apple laptop. 

"Sometimes it's all day," Zwi- 
ers said But he was quick to ex- 
plain the hours he spends online 
are a necessity - often filled by 
writing papers and reading c- 
mails instead of playing games or 
surfing social networking sites. 

But university counseling cen- 
ter Assistant Director Jonathan 
Kandell said it could be that Zwi- 



ers is one of as many as 10 per- 
cent of students who are addicted 
to the Internet - a trend that has 
emerged in the last decade with 
the ubiquity of personal comput- 
ers 

U.FLORIDA ALUMNUS- 
WEB SITE RAISES FUNDS 

GAINESVILLE, Ha. - A cat 
named Sampson underwent a 
life -altering surgery, thanks to 
his owner's Web design talent 
and the kindness of strangers 

University of Florida gradu- 
ate Jonathan Reus, a multime- 
dia engineer at Shands, solicited 



donations through a Web site he 
designed to raise money for his 
cat's operations Combined with 
revenue from a benefit concert, 
the effort helped cover the cost of 
Sampson's risky $2,300 surgery. 
In February 2006, Samp 
son began repeatedly urinat- 
ing outside his litter box. Wheji 
Sampson stopped eating, Reus 
got worried and took him to. a 
veterinarian. The vet told Reus 
Sampson had a deposit that was 
blocking his urethra and needed 
emergency surgery or he wou|d 
die within hours. 
Source wwwxopytxry.com 



By Pontile Jay 




The planner 

Campus bulletin board 



11-20 



CRYPTOQLUP 



OY XOEL PO MLL PAL 



UDDXDNOK7, X SDDF. ZSDFP 

ZGIOKZV XOUZIYM POP XIV 

"NAZVZ ONFZVZ GZFVZ 

Yesterday's Oyptoquip: ROY ORBISON TWffi 
ABOUT A LADY FOR WHOM PEOPLE FBEI DEEP 
SYMPATHY; "PITY WOMAN." 

Today's Cryptoquip Clue: D equals O 



The pinner is the Collegians campus bulletin board service Items 
in the calendar can be published up to three times. Items might 
not appear because of space constraints but are guaranteed to 
appear on the day of the activity To place an item in the Campus 
Calendar, stop by Kedzie 116 and fill out a form or e-mail the news 
editor at coltegi(m@yub.k5ii.tdu by 1 1 a.m. two days before it is 
to run. 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral defense of 

the doctoral dissertation of Mudeuar Shah at 8:30 a.m. today in 
Cantwelim. 

■ The American Red Cross Club of K State will have in 
open informational meeting at S tonight in Calvin 218. 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral defense of 
the doctoral dissertation of Neeraj Nepai at 1 11 a.m. Tuesday in 
Cardwell119 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral defense 
of the doctoral dissertation of Jincheng Gao at 4 p.m. Tuesday in 



Ac*en324B. 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral defense 
of the doctoral dissertation of Xinyan Li at 4:20 p.m. Tuesday in 
Throckmorton 403 1. 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral defense 
of the doctoral dissertation of Kathryn Brooks at 9 a.m. Nov. 27 in 
Bluemont368. 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral defense of 
the doctoral dissertation of Karma Fabnzzi at 12:30 p.m. Nov 27 in 
Throckmorton 2002. 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral defense 
of the doctoral dissertation of Furaha Mramba at 1 p.m. Nov. 27 
in Waters 129. 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral defense of 
the doctoral dissertation of Rim hayal at 9 a.m. Nov 2! in Fiedler 
2116. 

■ loach for America wilt have an informational meeting 

1 1 i.m. to 2 p.m. Nov. 28 in the K -State Student Union Food Court. 



The blotter | Arrests in Riley County online at ivvvwfoto^o/te[7/t7/i.com. 



Corrections and ■ 
clarifications 

Corrections and ctarihcat ions run in this space, 
if you see something that should be corrected, 
call news editor Leann Sullen at (785) 532- ' 
65 56 or e-ma il cotkgwi&pubJuti.edu 

Kansas State Collegian 

(USPS 291 020) The Kansas State Col- ' 
legian, a student newspaper at Kansas ' 
State University is published by Student 
Publications Inc., Kedrie 103, Manhat- 
tan, KS 66506. The Collegian is published 
weekdays during the school year and 
on Wednesdays during the summer. 
Periodical postage is paid at Manhattan, 
KS 66S02. POSTMASTER: Send address 
changes to Kansas State Collegian, 
circulation desk, Kedzie 103, Manhattan, 
KS 66506-7167. 
© Kansas State Collegian, 2006 



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Monday, Nov. 20, 2006 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 3 



Marching band closes season with compiled show 



ByjMSiSachdeva 

KANSAS STAN COUf WAN 

The K State marching 
band performed a compila- 
tion of all of its shows from 
this year as part of the annual 
end -of- season performance 
Sunday afternoon in Aheam 
Pield House. 

"This performance pro- 
vides a good chance for Mom 
and Dad and other family 
members to come down and 



see these kids perform," Frank 
Tracz, director of bands, said 
"It also gives us a chance to 
recognize all the effort our 
members put in." 

Dressed in white T-shirts 
and purple windpanta, the 
usually animated band mem- 
bers were seated throughout 
the performance, but by no 
means did they remain still 
as they danced in their seats. 

The band opened the show 
with its traditional pre game 



set before moving into a set 
dedicated to the lit Infantry 
Division based in Fort Riley 

The band's next set cap- 
tured the big-band sound of 
late band director Maynard 
Ferguson with featured so- 
los on trombone and trumpet 
and an almost tribal rhythm 
from the drum line. 

The concert continued 
with the band's video -game 
themed set from its All-Uni- 
versity Homecoming perfor- 



mance, featuring the theme 
songs from Super Mario 
Brothers and The Legend of 
Zelda. 

Throughout the band's 
performance, the color guard, 
the baton twirlers and the 
Classy Cats performed their 
accompanying routines. 

"Thanks to the color guard, 
twirlers, and the Classy Cats 
for remembering all those 
complicated movements and 
coming back on a Sunday 




. Lyndsay Bom | COUEGIAN 
Drum Major Brian Long, senior in mechanical engineering, signals to the K-State marching band to end a song at the band's concert Sunday 
afternoon at Ahern Field House. 



afternoon after the season's 
over," Tracz said. 

"1 could tell they were 
thinking 'Whoa, slow down,' 
at some points, but you kept 
together very well, ladies." 

After performances of 
music from the movie "The 
lncredibles" and the band 
Chicago, the marching band 
paused to honor its graduat- 
ing members, many of whom 
were active with the band for 
five years or more. 

Next up for the band is 
preparation for K- State's un- 
determined bowl game. 

"What we do for the bowl 
depends on which one we 
end up going to," Tracz said. 
"Once we know how much 
time we'll have to prepare, 
where we'll be going, we'll be 
able to work from there " 

Brian Stuckenschmidt, ju- 
nior in music education and 
assistant section leader of 
the trumpets, said he was a 
senior in high school the last 
time K State qualified for a 
bowl game, and he is excited 
to attend the game this year. 

"I think the experiences 
I've had with band are defi- 
nitely worth the time com- 
mitment" Stuckenschmidt 
said "The free bowl trip this 
year will definitely be an add- 
ed bonus." 

Stuckenschmidt said the 
band practices for two hours 
every Tuesday and Thursday. 
Practices will continue for the 
rest of the semester in prepa- 
ration for the bowl game. 

"1 think the band did very 
well today," Sydney Sample- 



ton, junior in public relations, 
said. "They're often underes- 
timated. 

"The acoustics here were a 
lot better than at the stadium. 
At the games the focus is usu- 
ally on football, but today the 
band got to be the center of 
attention" 



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OPINION 



Page 4 

TO THE POINT 

Watch what 
you eat, but 
don't despair 

lis the season for overeating. 

But it doesn't always have to 

be that way during the holidays. 

Students still can Tom „,„„„„ 

enjoy the No- editorial selected 

, n and debated 

vember, Decern- by the editorial 

ber and January &* and wr ?" en 

festivities, but in a opinion is formed. 
, ... This is the 

healthy way. Collegian's official 

You don't °P irion 

always need 

seconds of the entire cornucopia 
of Thanksgiving food offerings, 
because each of those items will 
reappear on the buffet next year. 
Mashed potatoes and pumpkin 
pre are not going out of style. 

A touch of exercise and por- 
tion control eating with a little 
willpower will curb the effects of 
consuming too much, whether 
it's at Thanksgiving dinner or a 
holiday hors d'oeuvres party. 

However, if you do go over- 
board on the stuffing Thursday, 
don't fret. It's one day, one meal, 
and you won't swell to the size of 
the Charlie Brown balloon in the 
Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade. 

Yes, overeating does contribute 
to the United States' obesity epi- 
demic, but one day of indulging 
probably won't pack 10 pounds 
on your frame. 

Take a walk with the family or 
choose teams for a friendly game 
of flag football after the Kansas 
City Chiefs play the Denver Bron- 
cos Thursday for some physical 
exertion, and return to your nor- 
mal, hopefully healthy diet and 
exercise routine on Friday 



LOLLEGIAN 



EmUy LtwrtiKt | EDilM iNCmff 

Kwiy Flith« | M1NAGIK ilHTOK 

Lunn MM I NtWHffllM 

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Owtn Konntdy | OTN10N (EH ECU 

iMthmry T. ftkoli | msmHWi EDUOI 

SW«n Doll | WHO EDI I0» 

ftoyct Mjynn | OKI IM EEMEM 

Login C. Ad»mi | WlllH f 01101 

K«iiy wm i j mi | k> wuuan 

Courtney Slaypon | AKI »0 MtlMiCR 



WRITE TO US 

Letters can oe submitted by email to Wrm#ipufc 
kiu.edu, or in person to Mitt 116. Please include 
you i full name, year in school and major. Letters 
should be limited to 2S0 words. All submitted letters 
may be edited for length and clarity 



CONTACT US 

Kansas State Collegian 
Kodxl* 103 Manhattan, KS 66S02 

Display ads (785)552-6560 

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CAMPUS FOURUM 

395-4444 or- 

fourum@spub.ksu.edu 



The Campus Fotimm is the Collegian's anonymous 
call-in system. The Fourum is edited to eliminate 
vulgar, racist, obscene and libelous comments. The 
comments are not the opinion of the Collegian nor 
are they endorsed by the editorial staff. 

Hey I- State football, let's make this weekend even 
worse for the Jayhawks 

Cedrique Flemming is the worst Witter In the 
universe. Get him off the staff 

Scooter girl has the same jacket as I do. I'm excited. 



Need more Fourum? Go to www.kjtatHettt 
gtanxom for the full version . 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, Nov. 20, 2006 



Holiday budget crunch 

The most wonderful time of the year, for retailers, not consumers that is 




BECKY 

5TEINERT 



Thanksgiving is upon 
us once again, and with it, 
the commencement of the 
Christmas shopping sea- 
son. "Black Friday," as the 
day after Turkey Day is so 
dramatically called, usually 
is celebrated by over- zeal- 
ous consumers waking up at 
ungodly hours to purchase 
unnecessary items at lower 
prices. 

This budget-stretch 
ing time of year has 
become largely 
commercialized 

Stores take 
the op port u 
nity to make 
money. Cus- 
tomers take the 
opportunity to 
suck the care and 
though tfulness out 
of gift-giving. 

For stores, pron 
leering during the holiday 
season is a science The first step of 
their method is to begin the Christmas season 
months early 

This has been noted by many a shopper, but 
has anyone discovered what benefit this brings 
for the merchant? 

According to MSNBC.com, the purpose of 
this trend is to encourage customers to pay full 
price for items. If customers see an 
item, they will, theoretically, buy it 
immediately for fear that it will be 
gone later in the season 

Manufacturers have tricks up 
their own sleeves. One of these is the 
tendency to take one existing product, 
revamp it slightly and market it as the 
new "must-have" The video-game industry 
is a prime example The newly released Sony 
PlayStation 3 soon will make its predecessors 




completely obsolete, leaving little recourse to 
the owners of the machines but to purchase the 
new unit. 

Also, it seems Fisher Price has created the 
TMX Elmo. It's just like the Tickle Me Elmo 
of years past, but more "X-treme" Sure, one 
can be content with an Elmo that laughs and 
shakes upon having his stomach squeezed, but 
why not replace it with an Elmo that rolls on 
the floor laughing upon having his stomach 
squeezed? Kudos to Mattel 
for continuing to coast on 
this 10-year-old fad 
Here's hoping the 
novelty hasn't 
worn off for 
everyone. 

Consum- 
ers, always on 
the lookout for 
the newest and 
edgiest items. 



fall prey to all of it. Parents go to outlandish 
lengths to obtain the perfect gifts for their chil- 
dren. 

As a result of this indulgence, children's 
sense of entitlement is rising. According to 
People magazine, upon the release of Tickle 
Me Elmo in 1996, the low supply inflated 
prices, and the products, usually $30-$40, 
fetched as much as $1 ,500 

The suggested age group for the TMX Elmo 
is 18 months to 5 years old. Apparently, when 
deciding between shelling out $1,500 or catch- 
ing hell from their 18- month-old, parents took 
the former as the more reasonable option. 
Finally, the concept of giving someone a 
meaningful gift to demonstrate though tfulness 
has become a burden. It is a to-do list to be 
accomplished in order to meet social norms. 
Rather than taking inherent delight in generos- 
ity, many people find only grief and tension in 
the process of searching for gifts and spending 
money, and they are merely relieved when it is 
all over. However, everyone must be acknowl- 
edged in the form of material goods, from 

co-workers to children, hairdressers to 
neighbors. 

While some use the holiday 
season to relax and enjoy what 
they have, others use it to place 
monetary value on relation- 
ships and levels of caring. 
Companies try to turn a profit 
through whatever means 
necessary. Though from dif- 
ferent viewpoints, today when 
the word "Christmas" comes 
to mind, for many, the word that 
follows is "money." 



Becky Ste Inert Is i freshman 
in psychology. Pleas* stnd 

comments to apinmnmtmb. 
kiu.edu. 



Illustrations by Elvis Acholpohl | COLLEGMN 



Dangerdisgust accompany popular vice of tobacco 




There are many 
things in 
this world 
that aren't 
particular- 
ly pleasant, 
like AK 
47s, needles 
and vicious 
dogs. But one 
thing, which mil- 
lions of people 
spend as much as $1,500 
on a year, is something 
that is quite unpleasant 
and just as dangerous as an 
attacking dog or machine 
gun. 
Although it might not cause a 
fast death, it can be responsible 
for a rather slow and painful one 
marked by cancer, enduring pain, 
chronic illness and the slow dete- 
rioration of organs. 

But what makes this thing 
so excruciating is that it is ad- 
dictive. 

Why would any- 
one spend hundreds of 
dollars on something 
that contains a popu- 
lar ingredient for hair 
removal or pieces of 
fiberglass? 

This is 
something that is 
hard to understand, 




KEISEY 
CHILDRESS 



being that this 
"thing" is probably 
the most popular 
vice in the world. 
Tobacco should 
come to mind now. 
When 1 see my 
father or a class 
mate spitting out a 
stream of tobacco, 
it makes me won- 
der why it is so alluring. What is 
so great about having to interrupt 
work, class or time with friends 
and family in order to slip outside 
and smoke a cigarette or to place a 
chunk of tobacco in your lip? 

What is so great about having 
yellow teeth and dried-out skin? 

The smell, the taste and the very 
idea of smoking is what makes it so 
unattractive. 

Think of the action of smoking 
a cigarette in the literal sense: you 
place a mashed up plant rolled in 
paper, with other added chemicals, 
between your lips and light it on 
fire. 

Or you place a wet, mashed 
up plant laced with fiberglass that 
makes little cuts in your lip to move 
its ingredients into the bloodstream 
faster (for the high and for a higher 
addiction level), into your bottom 
lip and slowly spit it out into an 
open cup or on the ground as it 
gets stuck in between your teeth. 



Now think about how stupid the 
advertisements are that attempt to 
promote these habits and actions as 
sexy, masculine or cool. 

I guarantee you many people's 
ideas of sexy and masculine do not 
include spitting repeatedly into a 
cup or huffing away on little sticks 
with an off-putting smell that at- 
taches itself to the breath, skin and 
clothes of the smoker 

This effect is another conse- 
quence of forcing others in the area 
to experience the delightful smoky 
atmosphere. 

The sight of the spit cup is an- 
other issue in itself 

No one, especially children and 
others forced to be in the situation, 
should have to breathe secondhand 
smoke or worry about knocking 
over the disgusting cup of spit. 

The issue of tobacco, ultimately, 
comes down to the choices indi- 
viduals make. 

However, it is unfair to force 
other people, especially children, to 
deal with secondhand smoke when 
the user is unwilling to accommo- . 
date those who dislike it by going 
outside or not using it in their pres- 
ence. 



Kelsiy Childress Is • junior In English lltintuw 
and women's studios. Fleas* tosd comments 
to opinhnmpub.kiu.t4ti. 



MMBMMi 



Monday, Nov. 20, 2006 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Pages 



'Bring in the Greeks' 

2-day event assists 

seniors, children 



By Duttln Sanborn 

KANimiAKCOUHGIAN 

More than 200 greeks par- 
ticipated in this year's "Bring 
in the Greeks" 

Activities took place Nov. 
13 and 14, with all 37 greek 
houses represented 

"BIG stands for "Bring in 
the Greeks' and is basically a 
huge community service proj- 
ect," said Paul Kauffman, In 
terfraternity Council director 
of community and internal 
relations. 

Activities for the week 
included volunteering at St 
Joseph's Senior Village and 
the Boys and Girls Clubs of 
Manhattan, raking leaves and 
organizing a canned food 
drive. The canned food items 
were picked up on Friday and 
given to the Flint Hills Bread- 
basket. 

"To get ready for the event, 
we talked to local businesses 
and organizations to find 
out what we could do to 
help them out," Kauffman 
said "Then we went to all 
the greek houses to give out 
sign-up sheets to nil the time 
slots." 

Many of the participants 
said they enjoyed helping 
with the event. 



Michelle LeCluyse, junior 
in biology and member of Al- 
pha Delta Pi, said she enjoyed 
playing with the children at 
the Boys and Girls Clubs. 

"We got to hear about their 
lives and what they were do- 
ing in school," LeCluyse said, 
"1 think it shows the kids that 
people really do care." 

In addition to assisting the 
community, BIG. also helps 
participants acquire com- 
munity service hours, which 
most houses require. 

Clinton Cooper, sopho- 
more in business admistration 
and member of Sigma Nu, 
volunteered at St Joseph's 
Senior Village. 

"1 assisted in the activity of 
the day, which happened to 
be bingo," Cooper said. "We 
helped the senior citizens 
read their cards and repeated 
numbers as welt as just mak- 
ing conversation with them. 
They really seemed to enjoy 
the company." 

Volunteers also helped 
clean up outside of St. Jo- 
seph's. 

"I helped clean up flower 
beds and pull weeds," Austin 
Roepe, freshman in biology, 
said. 

"It was fun to give back to 
the community." 



Mack on Lack' grows in 95th year 



By Duttin Sanborn 

KANSAS STAll COLLEGIAPI 

Omega Psi Phi fraternity's 
"Attack on Lack" service 
week marks 95 years of ser- 
vice since its inception. 

"Every year we have a 
service week for our Pound 
ers' Day," said Joel Pearson 
graduate student in counsel 
ing of student development 
"but this year we added more 
events." 

The activities took place 



last week and included the 
group's Founders' Day on 
Friday. Some of the service 
projects included the Dr. 
Charles R. Drew Memorial 
Blood Drive, a coat drive, 
food sorting at the Flint Hills 
Breadbasket and Adopt-a- 
Highway 

"We looked for areas of 
need in Manhattan and tried 
to fill those needs," Pearson 
said 

The coat drive was an 
extension of the Salvation 



Army coat drive. The frater- 
nity wanted to involve more 
faculty and students in the 
drive, so members set up 
a table in the K State Stu- 
dent Union for collections 
throughout Pounders' Week 

Members of the fraternity 
helped sort cans for the Flint 
Hills Breadbasket 

"A lot of groups col- 
lect cans for the Flint Hills 
Breadbasket, so we wanted 
to help in another way," 
Pearson said. "We found out 



that the cans need to be sort 
ed alter they are brought in." 

Adopt-a- Highway is a 
new event for the fraternity 
Members cleaned a 2- milt 
stretch of Interstate -70 Sat 
urday. 

In the Founders' Week 
blood drive, 25 people do 
nated. 

"The purpose of this 
blood drive was to en coin 
age more minorities to give 
blood," Pearson said. 



Senate passes act to grant millions to Fort Riley 



ByMUtonVorif 

KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

The US. Senate approved 
the Military Construction and 
Veterans Affairs Appropriations 
Act Tuesday that will bring mil- 
lions of dollars to Fort Riley 

The act was first proposed 
last May. Sen. Pat Roberts, R- 
Kan , said he was pulling for its 
approval in the Senate. 

"I am pleased the Senate has 
acted to improve the quality of 
life for our men and women in 
uniform, their families and veter- 
ans, especially during this time of 
war when so many are sacrific- 
ing their safety for our nation," 
Roberts said in a release. 

The act will give Fort Riley 
$32 million for a barracks com- 
plex, $52 million for a child 
development center, and $102 
million for a vehicle inspection 



and cargo processing facility. 
Deb Skidmore, media relations 
officer at Fort Riley, said these 
projects will help Fort Riley 

"We're obviously very ex- 
cited," Skidmore said. "We can 
use the help with all the sol- 
diers coming in. Port Riley is 
constantly growing." 

The fort's growth was the 
main reason for the large 
amount of money appropriated 
for these projects. 

"(Port Riley) does get a lot of 
money because of the incoming 
troops," Sarah little, communi- 



cations director for Roberts, said. 
'The post there is going to grow 
significantly because of Iraq deci- 
sions." 

Roberts said he was pleased 
Fort Riley will receive a new ve- 
hicle inspection facility 

'This will help speed up crit- 
ical construction on post while 
ensuring the safety of those who 
live and work there," Roberts 
said. 

The act also includes the ex- 
pansion of healthcare benefits 
for veterans According to a 
news release from the office of 



Sen. Sam Brownback, R Kan , 
the act encourages the Veterans 
Administration to provide faith 
based counseling for victims ol 
posttraumatic stress syndrome 
It also calls for an education ini 
tiative to inform veterans of the 
health benefits for which they 
might be eligible 

The act now will move to a 
conference committee to iron 
out the differences between the 
House and Senate versions. It 
then will go back to the Hon 
and Senate to be passed and 
then signed by the president 




I* 



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Course Title 


Course # 


Ret* 


Credit 


Dates 


Times 




Agriculture 














Practicum In Bakery Technology 


GRSC 701 


94100 


1UG/G 


14-1/10 


MTWUF 6:00 AM-430PM'' . 




Architecture, Planning, 8 Design 








. 




Topics m Architectural Design Methods 










^^^^ ^!M 




The Expressive Line 


ARCH 710 


94107 


3UG/G 


12/27-1/10 


MTWUF 12:30 PM-418 PM 




LEED (or Professional Accreditation 


ARCH 715 


94109 


3UG/G 


12/27-1/10 


MTWU? 12.00 PM-6 PM 




Beginning Airbrush 


IAPD406 


94136 


3UG 


12/27-1/10 


MTWUh 1:00 PM-* 4S PM 




Portfolio Design Studio 


IAPD406 


94137 


3UG 


12/27-1/10 


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Portfolio Design Studio 


1APO830 


94139 


3G 


12/27-1/10 


MTWUF 9:00 AM-1 2 45 PM 




Design Graphics and Visual Thinking 


LAR310 


94109 


3UG 


12/27-1/10 


MTWUF 1 00 PM-500 PM 




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LAR741 


94110 


3UG/G 


12/27-1/10 


MTWUF 1Q0PM-5.0QPM 




Computer Applications in Planning and Design 


PLAN 630 


94150 


1.2UG/G 


1/3-1/10 


MTWUF 9:00 AM-1 :45 PM 




Arts & Sciences tf 








4 


f 




Understanding Islam J£ v 


AMETH560 


94105 


ai/G/G 


12/27-1/10 


MTWUF 9:0Q AM- 12:45 
MTWU F St 9.00 AM-5:O0 PM 




Forensic Medicine and the Investigation of Death 


ANTH684 


94103 


3UQ/G 


12/27-1/9 




The History of the American Intelligence Community 


HIST 200 


94117 


3UG 


7/l 12/27-1/10 


MTWUPtOO PM.1u;15 PM 




Sport and Exercise Personality 


KIN 592 


94123 


3UG«3 


12/27-1/10 > 


MTWUF8:30AM-4i;»PM 




Jazz in Kansas City and the Southwest 


MUSIC 424 


94124 


3UG 


12/27-1/10 


MTWUF 100P*M;45PM 




From Metropolis to the Heartland: Immigrant 


SOCIO 500 








MTWUF 9:00 AM- 10QPM 




Experiences In America 


94125 


30G/G 


12/27-1/10 




Social Construction of Serial Murder 


SOCIO 562 


94126 


3UG/G 




MTWUF 1:00 PM-6.-Q0 PM 




1 •/ > 










Sa9 00AM-5:00PM 


.^aifc. 


Ethics in Drama Therapy 

Topics In Technical Theatre Scene Painting 


Tr|WE630 


94126 


3UG/G 


12/27-1/10 


MTWUF 9:00 AM-500 PM 




THTPE711 


Zl 


3UG/G 


12/27-1/19 


MTWUF 9:00 AM-tOOPM 




Women and Environmefrlalism The Ecofemtnrst 


* v^LV 










P "~ M " ' : 


WOMST500 


,uo* ,„.» 


MTWUF 8:00 AM-1 00 PM 




Business 

Introduction to Total Quality Management 


MANGT300 


94157 


1UG 


1M 


MF5,Wf1n-i0,-WPM 

Sa TOO PM-5 00 PM 




Achieving Career Success 


MANGT487 


94140 


3UG 


1272M/10 


MTWUF 6: 15 AM- (2 :00 PM 




Education 


11 








I 




Stress Management 


bOCEP 502 


94163 


3UG/G 


12O7-1H0 


MTWUF 3:30 PM-6 30 PM 




Stress Management for Teachers. Counselors. 














and Ad 
Early Ftek 

EnflrieeH 


ministrators -^ 


EDGEP802 


94162 
94160 


3G 

1UG 


12/27-1/10 MTWUF 3:50 PM-6 30 PM 
12/27 Vlf^^/J/^J. 










|| 






CAD m El, 


gineertng and Construction 


ARE 311 


94166 


2UG 


12/27-1/10 


MTWUF 8:00 AM-12 00 PM 




Inrroductid 


n to LEED 


ARE 720 


94111 


1UG/G 


1/3-1/10 


MTWUF 1O0PM4.00PM 




jmroductia 


n to Information Technology 


as 101 


94146 


1UG 


12/2M2/28 


WUF BOO AM-12 10 PM 




Introduction to Microcomputer Spreadsheet 














Applicator* 


CIS 102 

as 103 


94147 

ft A ud 


tuo 


1/2-1M 

tw 4 1 4 n 


TWU 8 00 AM-12 10 PM 
MTW 8 00 AM- 12 10 PM 




introduction to Microcomputer Oatabase AppHcaBons 


94146 


1 UG 


1/B-1/1U 




Topics in Construction Management: TW-ilp Concrete 














Structures In Construction Martgt 


CNS644 


84145 


2UG/G 


1/2-1/10 


MTWUF 8:00 AM 12:00 PM 




introduction to Total Quality Management 


DEN 300 


94164 


1UG 


1/6-1/8 


MF 5.00 PM- 10 00 PM 
Sa 1:00 PM-5 00 PM 




Problems/fing and Tech: Hanyopar Training 


DEN 388 


94166 


3UG 


1/2-1/30 


TWUF 8:00 AM-7 00 PM 




Human Ecology 














Understanding Death, Dying. Grief and Loss 


FSHS300 


94167 


3UG 


12/27-1/10 


MTWUF 8 30 AM-12 30 PM 


■ 


introduction to Marriage and FamMy Therapy 


FSHS704 


94171 


3DGVG 


12/27-1/10 


MTWUF 830 AM-12 15 PM 




Topics Premarital Education and Counseling 


FSH6708 


94172 


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12/27-1/10 


MTWUF6 00PM-1000PM 




Seminar in 


Long- Term Can Adrrsrwraton 


QERON610 


94180 


3UG/Q 


12/28-1/10 


MTWUF 500 PM-t 00 PM 






www.dce.ksu.edu/lntersession 





SPORTS 



Page 6 



Breakthrough performer 

Joshua Mo«rt — Defensive back 

The true freshman stopped 
t Kansas drive In the second 
quarter with in ke diving 
interception in the end zone. 
It was the first of his career, 
and he also had five tackles 
before being carted off the 
field after a collision with 
safety Chris Carney in the 
third quarter. 




Turning point 

Fourth quarter Freeman's third 
Interception seals the game. 

With all the offensive troubles, the 
Wildcats trailed 23 13 early in the fourth, 
but they appeared to be driving for a 
touchdown From the tay hawks 47 -yard 
line, Josh Freeman tried a screen pass on 
tftlrd-and-o, but the pass was picked off 
by Kansas defensive back Anthony Webb 
— his second interception — and re- 
turned for a touchdown and a 30- 1 3 lead 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



By the numbers 



5 



The Kansas defense totaled five sacks and: 
12 tackles for loss, including Ave by defen- 
sive tackle James McClinton. The consistent 
pressure on Freeman forced him into several 
bad decisions, resulting in fix turnovers that 
obviously changed the course of the game. 




Monday, Nov. 20, 2006 

Game MVP 

Jon Cornish proved why he is the Big 1 2 
Conference's leading rusher with 1,331 yards 
this season. Cornish had no trouble torching 
the K- State defense for 201 yards and two 
touchdowns on 1 S carries. It was the first time 
the Wildcats allowed an opponent to top the 
200-yard mark since Iowa State's Troy Davis 
ran For 22 S yards in 1 996. Cornish scored on 
runs of 1 2 and 1 3 yards, giving the senior 
seven touchdowns on the season. The final 
score sealed the win for the Jayhawks 



Analysis 

Freeman 
not only one 

at fault in loss 



By Jonathan Garten 

lANWSIATt COLLEGIAN 

LAWRENCE - It would be easy to 
place all the blame for K-State's 39-20 
loss to Kansas squarely on the shoul- 
ders of true freshman quarterback Josh 
Freeman. 

He was responsible for all six of 
the Wildcats' turnovers, which the 
fay hawks converted into 30 points 
However, it's not that simple Freeman 
needed help to play that badly, and he 
had plenty. 

Here are a few of the others Free- 
man overshadowed with his disastrous 
day: 

TEAMMATES 

After watching the offensive line's 
protection in K-State's 45-42 victory 
over Texas, it was hard to imagine how 
it could be better Against Kansas, it 
definitely was not better. 

The Jayhawks' defensive game plan 
called for a heavy dose of blitzing, 
which forced Freeman to throw on the 
run the entire day. Kansas sacked Free- 
man five times and hurried him five 
more. 

"It's not all on Josh," senior offensive 
lineman Greg Wafford said. "We still 
got to give him time and give him the 
looks to make the plays." 

COACHES 

Coach Ron Prince was the first one 
to admit Freeman wasn't the only one 
to blame for Saturday's loss 

"I did a poor job, not Josh," Prince 
said "He's a freshman quarterback 
who's done unbelievable. So every- 
thing he's done for us 1 consider a real 
blessing." 

KANSAS DEFENSE 

Although there were plenty of peo- 
ple bom Freeman's own team making 
life difficult for him, his biggest problem 
might have been the Jayhawk defense. 

While K-State was upsetting Texas 
last week, Kansas was taking the week 
off. That extra week of preparation 
seemed to pay off for the Jayhawks. 

"We had a real good game plan on 
what they tried to do," Kansas comer 
back Aqib Talib said. "We were really 
motivated tonight playing in a rivalry 
game, and we were just trying to fly 
around and make plays" 

The Jayhawks' passion for the rival- 
ry game, which put them over the top, 
was similar to the way K-State played 
in last year's Sunflower Showdown on 
Oct 8, 2005. The Wildcats, who won 
12-3, recovered six of a total of seven 
fumbles that day, because they had 
players who were constantly hustling 
toward the ball 



Kansas 39, K-State 20 



Bittersweet ending 




Left; K-State 
quarterback 
Josh Freeman 
gets sacked 
by Kansas' Joe 
Mortensen 
during the 
first hah*. The 
Jayhawks felt on 
the ball in the 
endzone for the 
touchdown. 

Chrittopher 
Hanawinckal 

COLLEGIAN 

Below: K State 
foot bat) coach 
Ron Prince 

argues with a 
referee during 
the Wildcats' 
39-20 loss to 
Kansas Saturday 
in Lawrence 
at Memorial 
Stadium. The 
Wildcats suffered 
six turnovers 
in Saturday's 
game against 
the Jayhawks 
and ended their 
regular season 
play with a 7-5 
record. 

Cat rim ttawnon 
COLLEGIAN 



Wildcats finish regular season 
with turnover-ridden loss to Kansas 



By Nick Dunn 
KANSAS S1A1E COLLEGIAN 

LAWRENCE - On the first play 
from scrimmage of K-State's 39-20 
loss at Memorial Stadium, K-State 
freshman quarterback Josh Freeman 
hit tight end Jeron Mastrud over the 
middle for a 66-yard gain. 

The play put the Wildcats inside 
Kansas' red zone and seemed to put 
any fears to rest about K-State suffer- 
ing a letdown after the 45-42 upset 
against Texas last week. 

Mastrud broke tree at midficld but 
did not have the speed to make it to 
the end zone before being caught by a 
couple Jayhawk defensive backs 

"I just saw the end zone." Mastrud 
said. "I thought they were going to tip 
the ball, so 1 had to pull it in all the 
way. I was just trying to get in." 

That play would prove to be the 
perfect summary of the Wildcats' of- 
fense in the regular season finale. The 
Wildcats had no trouble moving the 
ball - they had 362 yards of total of- 
fense - but could manage only one of- 
fensive touchdown 

"We moved the ball the whole time 



on them," Mastrud said. "I was never 
in doubt of what we could do offen- 
sively We moved it almost every time 
we had it" 

The majority of the problems were 
caused by K State's inability to take 
care of the ball. In the three-game 
winning streak before the loss to the 
Jayhawks, the Wildcats turned over 
the ball three times On Saturday, 
Freeman doubled that on his own. 

"It was just one of those days." 
Prince said. "A lot of people around 
(Freeman) have to play well, and we 
were a little bit out of sync, a little bit 
out of rhythm 

"It's my responsibility for how the 
ball moves. That's the head coach's 
job. I'm the one that did a poor job, 
not Josh." 

Offensive troubles aside, the K- 
State defense had problems of its own 
trying to stop Kansas running back Jon 
Cornish. Cornish - the Big 12 Confer- 
ence's leading rusher with 1,331 yards 
this season - sliced through the Wild- 
cat defense for a career-high 201 yards 
and two touchdowns. 

"Everyone knew what they needed 
to do, but it just wasn't happening," 




defensive end Ian Campbell said. "We 
knew (Cornish) was a good running 
back going into the game, so that 
wasn't a surprise" 

K-State finished its regular season 
with a 7-5 overall record, but missed 
a chance to claim second place in 
the Big 12 North after Missouri lost 
to Iowa State A win would have 
clinched second in the North, and 
possibly fourth overall 

"1 can't say that it feels good, but 
we got that bowl game coming up," 
Campbell said 



MOORE FEELING BETTER 

Defensive back Joshua Moore is 
"in good spirits and resting comfort- 
ably" after his collision with teammate 
Chris Carney during Saturday's loss to 
Kansas, according to sports informa- 
tion director Garry Bowman. 

Moore was retreating on a ball 
thrown deep to the right side when 
he hit Carney. He laid on the field for 
several minutes before being carted 
off to a standing ovation. Further an 
nouncements concerning Moore will 
be made by Prince at Tuesday's press 
conference 



Kansas fans might need to prepare for bowl-eligibility letdown 



LAWRENCE - The scene 
following K-State's 39-20 loss to 
Kansas was similar but definitely 
not the same as the 
Wildcats' 45-42 win 
over No 4 Texas 
last weekend. 

Ecstatic fans 
who reeked of 
alcohol stormed the 
field. There were 
plenty of people 
taking pictures of 
the final score on 
the scoreboard. It was the perfect 
way to capture the Jayhawks' "huge" 
win. 

And then there were the goal 
posts. The ultimate moment of 
redemption for any football program 
is when it finally wins that break- 




JONATHAN 

GARTEN 



through game The K-State victory 
must have been extra special, be- 
cause the Kansas fans honored it by 
tearing down not one, but both goal 
posts. 

However, the difference between 
the two games is that it was easy to 
figure out why K-State's victory over 
Texas was a big win The Longhorns 
were heavily favored and ranked 
No 4 in the nation. Plus, there were 
so many exciting plays in the game, 
it was re-played the next morning 

Kansas' win over the Wildcats, 
on the other hand, came up lack- 
ing in several areas. K-State wasn't 
ranked, and the Jayhawks were even 
slightly favored to win the game. 
Also, Kansas just beat K- State two 
years ago. 

The only remaining excuse for 



the excessive celebration is that the 
win made Kansas bowl -eligible But 
bowl eligibility doesn't earn a team 
anything They don't make "bowl 
eligibility" shirts, and they won't be 
sending the team anywhere for the 
holiday season simply because it 
won six games 

And unless Kansas can go on the 
road this Saturday and beat Mis- 
souri, the Jayhawks have a strong 
chance of being one of those un- 
lucky teams that get nothing for its 
eligibility. That's because a loss will 
lock up ninth place in the Big 12 
Conference for Kansas. Why does 
that matter? Because the Big 12 
only has eight guaranteed bowl bids 

If the Jayhawks find themselves 
on the outside looking in, they will 
have to pray for an at-large bow] 



bid. That could gel tricky, especially 
since Kansas would be stuck on six 
wins. For example, the Poinsettia 
Bowl, which will take an at-large 
bid this year, will not take any six- 
win team over any seven -win team, 
according to Mark Neville, director 
of communications for the Poinset- 
tia Bowl. 

However, there still will be a 
handful of other bowl games that 
might need an at-large team. The 
problem is most bowls probably 
won't be chomping at the bit to get 
Kansas Fan support is so bad for 
the Jayhawks, they gave away tickets 
to students for last year's Fort Worth 
Bowl 

But the Jayhawk fans' celebration 
does bring up a question What jus 
tifies tearing down the goal posts? 



Apparently not much at Kansas 

The goal posts have fallen at least 
five limes in the last three years. 
Last year, the fans ripped the posts 
out of the ground for all three of the 
Jayhawks' Big 12 wins One of those 
wins came against Missouri, which 
Kansas beat for the third year in a 
row 

This type of thing doesn't happen 
at other universities Most fans of 
teams with any respect at all prob- 
ably couldn't name five times they 
tore down their goal posts 

But what can you expect from 
some of college football's most 
ridiculous fans? 



Jonathan Garten is a junior in print Journalism. 
Please send comments to iportjm tpub,iw,tiu 



> 



ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT | SEX j FOOD | YOUR LIFE 

THE EDGE 



Monday, Nov. 20, 2006 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 7 




PHOTM tOUSTESV Of COMEDY CENTWl 
Th. Amazing Jonathan stands next to his assistant. Psychic Tanya, with whom he has worked with for more than five years. The Amazing Jonathan: Wrong on Every Level," 
will show at 1 1 tonight on Comedy Central and will re-air at 1 a.m. Nov. 21 . 

Magic meets bad comedy 



"The Amazing Jonathan: 

Wrong on Every Level" 

Grade: B- 

TV show review by Matt Sundberg 

Are magicians even around any- 
more? Are they remotely relevant 
to society? 

These are the questions 1 
pondered as 1 watched Comedy 
Central's new special, "The Amaz- 
ing Jonathan: Wrong on Every 
Level," which aired Saturday night. 
For those who have never seen him 
before, the gimmick with Jonathan 
is that he is a magician/comedian. 
He performs "magic tricks" while 
cracking jokes and Interacting with 
the audience. The only problem 
is his magic sucks - and his jokes 
aren't good, either. 

As a throwback to his last stand- 
up special, Jonathan introduced 
his female assistant, Psychic Tanya, 
early in the show. 

Tanya, a ditzy blonde who is 
quite, urn, well-endowed, annoyed 
me tremendously, stumbling out 
throughout the show and crack- 
ing a few jokes, usually to provide 
distraction for Jonathan to set up 
his next trick. 

As 1 quickly learned, when 
Tanya opens her mouth, her voice 
is infuriatingly high, and her jokes 
are even worse than Jonathan's. 
She came out about halfway 
through the show with several 
expensive Blue Man Group tickets, 
and when Jonathan asked her how 
she got them, she lowered the 
tickets and had a ring of blue paint 
around her mouth Classy. 

Tanya turned out to be worth- 
less, though, because Jonathan 
chose a volunteer from the audi- 
ence at the beginning of the show. 



On this week 

The Amazing Jonathan: Wrong on Every 

level" 

Comedy Central 
11 tonight 
1 a.m. Nov. 21 

Some unfortunate man in his 
forties named John, who happened 
to be a doctor, was tapped to be 
the magician's assistant for the en- 
tire show. The poor guy awkwardly 
stood on the stage next to (he 
magician and was mocked merci- 
lessly the whole show, but he was a 
good sport. Jonathan even started 
brutally tickling him once he found 
out the doctor was ticklish. How 
many people can say they've been 
tickled onstage by a Vegas magi- 
cian? 

The jokes in this special are 
almost too rapid-fire and random 
to be comprehensible - Jonathan 
smashes birds into feathers with 
his bare hands, threatens people 
al gunpoint, takes $20 bills from 
people in the audience and rips 
them up, and hangs dead bunnies 
by strings 

At one point, Jonathan asked 
|uhn the assistant whether he ever 
blew bubbles as a kid. John said 
yes, and the camera then panned to 
an evil-looking clown in the audi- 
ence named Bubbles who seduc- 
tively waved at the camera 

Creepy. 

Undoubtedly, the best part of 
Jonathan's show, and the reason 
it was worthwhile to watch, was 
the unscripted banter between the 
magician and the random assistant 
he pulled from the audience 

For everything the old guy did 
and every time he helped set up a 
magic trick, the Amazing Jonathan 
had some smart ass comment to 




throw back His jokes might have 
been cheesy and lame, but the 
guy definitely has improvisational 
skills second only to say, Stephen 
Colbert. 

The Amazing Jonathan's comedy 
is a great example of something 
people either love or hate; there 
really is no third option. His jokes 



are lame, and his magic skills are 
sketchy at best, but he is tremen- 
dously amusing to watch I defi- 
nitely like his pissed-off attitude 
- he reminds me of Lewis Black 
doing magic 

Besides, any magician who flips 
off the audience at five-minute 
intervals is all right with me. 



TV's'Bachelor* 

to seek women 

for 10th season 

at casting call 



Staff reports 
KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

Women looking for a little love In Man- 
hattan just might find in within an hour's 
drive. 

ABC affiliate KTKA in Topeka has an- 
nounced an open casting call for female 
contestants on the reality TV series The 
Bachelor* 

The casting call will take place Nov. 27 at 
Pigskins Sports Bar In Topeka. 

The casting call is 6 8 p.m. Those inter- 
ested either can pick up an application at 
the 49 ABC studios or download one from Its 
Web site, www.49abcnrwi.am. 

ABC producers said they are seeking 
ambitious, charming and successful bach- 
elorettes who are ready to find true low. 

Sachelorettes selected will be featured 
in the show's 10th season of the popular TV 
series, which introduces one bachelor to 25 
eligible women. He then eliminates women 
from the group until one woman remains 
— with the choke to establish a relation- 
ship beyond the camera crew. 

KTKA News contributed to this report 



Cruise, Holmes wed, 
leave for honeymoon 

BRACCLANO, Italy (API — Officially, they got 
mamed in Los Angeles, but the spectacle of the 
wedding between Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes 
was here, in a 1 5th- century castle that evoked 
fairy tales and lit up with red, while and green 
fireworks for i cheering, celebrity- laden crowd 

There were fireworks inside, too, a "new- 
ending kiss" between the betrothed after they 
exchanged vows Saturday. The kiss lasted so 
long it caused guests to shout 'stop, stop 1 " said 
Giorgio Armani, wtw attended the wedding and 
designed the outfits of the bride, the groom and 
their baby, Sun. 

The couple flew out o( Rome Sunday (or 
a honeymoon in the Maldives, said Ciampino 
airport spokesman Adriano FranceschemThe 
rest of the wedding party was due to fry to la 
Angeles later in the day. 

WEEKEND 
BOX OFFICE 

■ The weekend totals listed are measured In 
millions of dollars. 

Top movies Tata) 

1. "Happy Fett" 

Warner Bros. Pictures 

2. "Casino Royal e" 
Sony Pictures 

1. "l^:Ciirtural Learnings,.," 

20th Century Fttt 

4. "The Santa Clause 3" 8 2 

Sony Pictures 





5. "Flushed Away" 
Paramount Pictures 



Mandate, Sony Pictures 

7. "Babel' 

Paramount Vantage 

t. "Saw Ml" 




9, "The Departed* 
Warner Bros. Pictures 

lO.TheQwwf 

Miramax films 

Source: www.mmiti. jwnoo.com 



HIS WEEK... A look at events that occurred during this week in history, other bizarre holidays, happenings 



TODAY 



1 859bickens comjrlejes^ 
A Tali of Two Cities P*- 



On this day in 1859, Charles Dickens* serialized 
novel, "A Tale of Two Cities," comes to a close, as the 
final chapter is published in Oidtens' circular, "All 
the Year Round" 

Dickens was born in 1812. His father, a clerk In 
the Navy pay office, was thrown in debtors' prison 
in 1824, and 12-yeaF-old Charles was sent to work 
in a factory. The miserable treatment of children 

j and the institution of the debtors' jail became 

[ topics of several of Dickens' novels. 

In Ms late teens, Dickens became a reporter. 

^ Among his most important works are 'David Cop- 
pemeld* (1 8501, "Great Expectations" ( 1 861 ), and 
*A Tale of Two Cities" (1S59). 

'" ' 1 1 " II 



TUESDAY 



1980: Millions watch to see who shot J.R. 



THURSDAY 



On this day in 180J50 million people around the world 
tuned in to television's popular primelime 
drama "Dal las" to find out who shot JR. Ewirtg, 
the character fans loved to hate. JR. had been shot on the 
season ending episode the previous March, which now stands 
as one of televrsions most famoui dtflhangen. The pkrt twist inspired 
widespread media coverage and left Americans wondering "Who shot JR.?" 




WEDNESDAY 



1906: 'SOS' distress signal adopted 



k 



"SO S" was adopted as a distress signal at the International Radio Telegraphic 
Convention in Berlin. The signal, however, had been used by the German government 
for radio regulations in April 1905. In popular usage, SOS became associated with 
phrases like "Save Our Ship,*"Save our Sou Is," "Survivors On Shlp,""Stop Other Signals" 
and "Save Our Sailors * today, people have taken SOS beyond a ship distress signal and 
use it as a way to describe personal stress or trouble, like in Rihanna's "S.O.S * 




1936: Life Magazine 

publishes new format 

On Nov. 23, 1936, the first 
ft I ssue of t h e pictona I ma gazme Life is 
\j« published, featunng a cover photo of the 
jji Fort Peck Dam by Margaret Bourke- 
Whrte. 

Life actually had its start earlier m 
the 20th century as a weekly humor 
publication, like today's The New 
Yorker in its use of art cartoons, 
humorous pieces and cultural 
reporting. When the original Life 
folded during the Great Depression, American 
publisher Henry Luce bought the name and re launched 
the magazine as a picture -based periodical on this day in 
1936. fly this time, Luce already had enjoyed great success 
as the publisher of Time, a weekly news magazine 



FRIDAY 



1932: FBI Crime Lab 

officially opens 

The crime lab that is now referred to as the FBI 
Scientific Crime Detection Laboratory officially 
opened in Washington, DC, on this day in 1932. 
The lab operated out of a single room and had 
only one full-time employee, Agent Charles AppeL 

Appel began with a borrowed microscope and 
a pseudo-scientific device called a hel urometer. 
By 1938. the FBI lab added polygraph machines 
and started conducting controversial lie detection 
tests as part of its investigations (n its early days, 
the FBI Crime Lab worked on about 200 pieces of 
evidence a year. By the 1990s, that number mul- 
tiplied to about 200,000 Currently, the FBI Cnme 
Lab obtains 600 new pieces of criminal evidence 
everyday. 
Source: History Owwefr Phottt : awttsy art 



Pages 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, Nov, 20, 2006 



Chorus perform? Christmas songs, organizes auction 



ByJMwSadMttwi 

UHttS SWfCOUiGWN 

Holiday cheer was in the 
air at the Houston Street Ball- 
room Sunday afternoon, as 
the Wamego Dutch Mill Sweet 
Adeline Chorus performed a set 
of Christmas classics. 

The performance was part of 
the group's third-annual silent 
auction benefit, Adeline's Holi- 
day Happening. 

The chorus is part of the 
Sweet Adelines International 
group, a worldwide organiza- 
tion of nearly 27,000 women in 
IS countries. 

According to the group's 
Web site, sweeUuklineirttLonj, 
Sweet Adelines works to "ad- 
vance the artform of music in 
style of barbershop harmony" 



Many of Sweet Adc ■. 
choruses have performed at 
large sporting events, Olympic 
ceremonies and on nationally 
aired television shows. 

The Wamego chorus has 44 
members from 12 communities, 
Kathy Freeze, co-chair for the 
event, said. 

The chorus' auction re if 
funds for the group, but his.. 
goes to awarding a scholarship 
to one female high school se- 
nior involved in music. Freeze 
said. 

The halls inside the ballroom 
were adorned with Christmas 
decorations, Poinsettias lined 
the entrance, and tinsel and rib- 
bon hung from the ceiling 

With about 300 people in 
attendance, Kathy LeValley, fa- 
cility manager for the Houston 



Street Ballroom, said she was 
pleased with the turnout 

"I'd say the crowd is up a lot 
from last year," LeValley said. 

Among the items up for auc- 
tion were posters autographed 
by K-State basketball players 
and coaches, a performance by 
Sweet Adeline valued at $300, 
uid homemade items like bas- 
kets, crafts and baked goods, 

"Many of the homemade 
items were made by our mem- 
bers." Freeze said. "With prac- 
ticing and making the items, 
I'd say we've been working this 
event since June." 

|osh Runyan, junior in el- 
ementary education, attended 
the benefit for the second time, 

"It's for a good cause, and 
it's nice to hear the live vocal 
Christmas music," he said. 




»N | COLLEGIAN 

Bill Rocha, resident of Frankfort, Kan,, auctions off a K-State women's basketball poster autographed by 
players and a men's basketball poster autographed by coach Bob Huggins during Sweet Adeline's Holiday 
Happening on Sunday afternoon in the Houston Street Ballroom. 



THANKSGIVING I Dining center feasts make students feel at home; otherstake part in friends' celebrations 



Continued from Page 1 

A FAMILIAR TRADITION 

Derby Dining Center was 
packed with students sipping 
cider and nibbling on cheese af- 
ter some got in line 45 minutes 
early to wait for the center's 
Thanksgiving dinner 

The meal consisted of almost 
everything one associates with 
Thanksgiving, from turkey and 
ham to mashed potatoes and 
crescent rolls. 

Mark Edwards, unit director 
of Derby, said each of the dining 
centers served the dinner. 



"Because it's who we are, and 
it's what we do," Edwards said 
"We take care of these kids. We 
recognize that they're away from 
home, and that there are tradi- 
tions and special events that 
they really begin to long for." 

Sarah Guge, freshman in 
mass communications, said she 
liked the variety of food avail- 
able, There were "tons of jellies 
and butters, and the dessert ta- 
ble was overflowing," she said. 

Trees filled with handmade 
paper turkeys surrounded the 
dining center, and leaves hung 
above the tables on spray-paint- 



ed tree branches 

Holly PLshney, catering coor- 
dinator, said the theme for the 
event was "The Fall Festival of 
Leaves," which was chosen with 
the help of a group of student 
dieticians who assisted with the 
dinner. 

"It's something edgy - not 
something that they'd have at 
home," she said. 

Laura Cline, freshman in 
family studies and human ser- 
vices, said the Thanksgiving din- 
ner was fun, because her family 
will not celebrate the holiday 
this year. 



A HOME AWAY FROM 
HOME 

Amanda Dixon spent every 
Thanksgiving at home with 
her close family, eating all the 
traditional Thanksgiving din- 
ner promises. But that tradi- 
tion ended when she came to 
K-State. 

Dixon, junior in graphic 
design, said her family lives 
in Clinton, N.J., and now that 
she lives in Kansas, she only 
visits once a year for Christ- 
mas 

"It's really not practical," 
she said. "There's no point in 



going home again two weeks 
later." 

Dixon now spends the 
Thanksgiving holiday with 
the families of friends she has 
met at K-State 

"My friends always make 
sure 1 have somewhere to go," 
she said. 

Dixon said one difference 
she has noticed is that her 



friends often have a family 
dinner with their extended 
families, while her family din- 
ner consisted of her parents 
and siblings, but she said she 
likes meeting other people's 
families. 

This year she is going to 
St. Louis with a friend. Dixon 
said she is excited because she 
has never visited the city. 




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Monday, Nov. 20, 2006 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 9 



PS3 | Release of gaming system leads to criminal action, online resales 



Continue! from Page 1 

offered him $800, plus $200 
to stay in place until midnight. 
When ha came back, Eslit said 
the ma>| gave him another 
$200 forjbeing trustworthy 

"1 was there for a total of 
about 24 hours, and I made 
$1,200," Ealit said "It was in- 
teresting. Everyone who was in 
line was planning to resell the 
PlayStations on eBay(.cowt)." 

Nationally, the sale of the 
system camed such pandemo- 
nium it.was associated with 
several retorts of crimes 

In Indiana, two men carry- 
ing PS3 systems they bought 
Friday were assaulted in an at- 
tempted robbery. 

Two Connecticut men tried 
to rob a line of 15 people wail- 
ing to buy the new systems, 
knowing they would have a 
large amount of money 

One man who refused to 
surrender his money was shot 
with a shotgun The wounds 
were not life-threatening, ac- 
cording to police. 



TWo Canadian men stood in 
line for two days, only to smash 
the new PS3 with a sledgeham- 
mer. 

They did it as a "social ex- 
periment to see people's reac 
lion." according to an article in 
the Ottawa Sun. 

At Best Buy in Manhattan, 
someone tried to steal a PS3 
out of a car, but people wait 
ing outside the store foiled the 
would-be thief, store employee 
lot' Rodriguez said. 

"When people went after 
him, I think he got scared," Ro- 
driguez said "He set it down 
really gently and kept run- 
ning." 

Best Buy sold 28 systems 
Friday. Rodriguez said 26 came 
in a shipment on Wednesday 
and two more arrived Friday 

"People camped for two 
days almost," Rodriguez said. 
"It was intense We had those 
sold before we opened." 

Ryan Foster, a Target em- 
ployee, said there were no 
problems with the people who 
waited outside of Target. 



"They were extremely civi- 
lized," he said. "They had their 
own little honor code," 

On eBay, the online auction 
site, hundreds of people were 
telling the new systems for a 
huge mark-up Sunday Ask- 
ing prices ranged from $2,000 
to $5,000, depending on the 
number of games and control- 
lers included. 

One listing aimed to tug at 
the heartstrings of potential 
buyers, a couple said the profit 
from the sale of the PS3 would 
be used to adopt a child, be- 
cause they can't have children 
of their own. 

Nintendo also released its 
newest system, the Wii, Sun- 
day. 

There was less of a frenzy 
for the $250 system, and a low- 
er demand because more sys- 
tems were available, but video- 
game players were nonetheless 
excited for its release. 

"Since Nintendo announced 
they're going to send 2 million 
to the US, 1 don't think people 
are as anxious to sleep outside 



and stuff" Foster said. "People 
came an hour or two before we 
opened and got theirs no prob- 
lem." 

Hastings Books, Music and 
Video had a raffle for the six 
Wii systems h had in stock 

Trevor Bailey, senior in 
management information sys- 
tems, said he was one of seven 
groups of people who entered 
the raffle, and he won the op- 
portunity to buy a Wii. Bailey 
said he enjoyed trying out the 
new system. 

"It's lot of fun," he said. "I 
mean, the controller is mo- 
tion-activated, so if you swing 
it, the character will swing a 
sword. To hit a baseball, you 
swing it. It's unique, different 
than anything else IVe played. 
You're not mashing buttons 
anymore." 

Employees at local stores 
said they couldn't say for sure 
when the next shipment of 
PlayStation 3 systems would 
come but expected another 
one in the week or two before 
Christmas. 



ACCIDENT | Victim's family 
requests privacy despite interest 



Continued from Page 1 

"The one thing that is 100 
percent sure is that anyone who 
has ever been on. in or around 
the Catt rocker's heart goes out," 
he said "It hurts everybody I 
can't imagine the level of hurt 
for those directly involved," 

No date has been set for a 
memorial service, and Pottroff 
said information will be re- 
leased as the family chooses. 

Dennis McCulloch, spokes- 
person for the University of 
Kansas Medical Center, said the 
hospital is not releasing any fur 
ther information about Orr, due 
to the family's request. 

■'The family of the man in- 
jured Saturday in Lawrence 
says is being treated for a criti- 
cal brain injury at the University 
of Kansas hospital," McCulloch 
said. "The family understands 
the public's interest in his con- 
dition but requests prayers and 
privacy." 



In response to the tragedy, 
at least one unofficial support 
group. "In Memory of the Cat- 
tracker," created by Kingman 
High School student Jack Boyer 
has sprung up on Facebook, 
bringing together alumni, cur 
rent K-State students, high 
school students and anyone 
moved by Saturday's event 

"1 wanted to do something 
about it even though I really 
couldn't," Boyer, resident of 
Kingman, Kan., said via e-mail, 
"so 1 guess creating the Pace 
book group was the most 1 
could do" 

As of 4 p.m. Sunday, the 
group had about 20 members 
By 6 p.m., it had grown to 44 

Boyer has used the Facebook 
group to post news about the 
condition of the injured man 

"I don't know anyone that 
was on the Cattracker when it 
happened, but they're part of 
the Wildcat family, so I feel for 
them," he said. 



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Flying Club has live air- 
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Call 785-776-1744. www- 
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785-539-1975 
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be placed free tor thru 

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shoes a( KSU vs. Texas 
game at north goalpost 
While with pink NIKE 
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ROOM, two bath. Very 
nice Please call. 

785-494-2863. leave mes- 
sage. Must selll 





FEMALE ROOMMATE 
needed $256/ plus one- 
third untitles Pets nego- 
tiable, washer/ dryer 
Within walking distance of 
Aggieville Contact Randi 
7 BS-21 5-9028 



w 

Sublease 



FEMALE SUBLEASE R 
wanted to share lour -bed- 
room/ two bath apartment. 
First month tree, $315/ 
month. Available now 
through July 2007. 
907-232-4601 

FURNISHED APART- 
MENT One bedroom 
One bathroom, washer/ 
dryer Rent $375 Trash 
and cable paid. 
765-31 7-631 3. 

MALE SUBLEASER 
needed in January. $300 
per month, plus one- third 
utilities Three -bedroom, 
two bath Call 
785-342-2932. 

malT SUBLEASER 

needed Spring 2007. 
close to campus $300 
per month plus one-hall 
utilities Please call Bran- 
don Bayless 
785-230-0512 

subleaser Deeded 

lor Spring 2007 semester 
$315 per month Four-bed- 
room apartment January 
rent paid 765-4 IB- 1778 



Housing Real tistate 




FEMALE ROOMMATE WBLMJW NEIUEU 

needed lor tour-bedroom 
house $350/ month plus 
electricity, gas, SBC. 
Quiet, nice house, major 
appliances Included 

(785-587-9207) 
(765-230-3008) 



spring 2007 
$350/ month Nice, newer, 
three -bedroom house, 
bciill 1997 785-221-2282. 

sUbleasers UEEbEb 



Manhattan CITY Ordi- 
nance; 4814 assure* ev- 
ery per ion equal opportu 
n ity I n houein g witho u t di ■ 
II notion on account of 
race, sen. familial status, 
military status, disability, 
religion, age, color, na- 
tional origin or ancestry 
Violations should be re- 
ported lo the Director of 
Human Resources at City 
Hall, (715)587-2440. 



FEMALE 

wanted tor three-bedroom 
house $300, utilities paid. 
Call 7B5- 537-4947 




MANHATTAN CITY Ordi- 
nance 4614 assure* ev- 
ery person equal opportu- 
nity in hou alngwflhoul dis- 
tinction on account of 
race, hi. (ami lis I status, 
military stetus, disability, 
religion, age, color, na- 
tional origin or ancestry 
violation* should be re- 
ported lo the Director ol 
Human Resources at City 
Hall, (785)567-2440. 
ONE AND iwo-bedroom 
apartment, 700 Fremonl 
$450 and $800 One 
month deposit, no pets 
7W-556-07t3 
ONE-BEDROOM 
CLOSE lo campus in 
newer complex No pets 
785-313-7473 

TWO-BEDROOM/ ONE 
bath lownhouse $850.00, 
new construction Also 
two-bedroom/ two bath 
apartment near the mall, 
call Wildcat Property at 
785-537.2332 



FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted to share 3 bad- 
room apartment near cam- 
pus $250 pel month plus 
1/3 utility Available Jan- 
uary 1st 765-537 1746 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted Share three-bed- 
room pnvate home Seri- 
ous students only $325 
plus one-third utilities Pre- 
fer lease through summer 
765-639-5762 

ROMMATE WANTED 
Three-bedroom house. 
$350, utilities included. 
Washer/ dryer, fenced 
yard, full kitchen, oft street 
parking, dose to campus 
785-313-4730 



tor three- bedroom apart- 
ment One and one- halt 

B53MMATE b,th - * 240 ' foom doSB ,0 
campus and AggieviHe 
Available January Con- 
tact 785-537-7810, 
316-214-4745. 




Employment- Careers 





FEMALE SUBLEASER 
needed lor two-bedroom 
two bath apartment Con- 
tact Collsta at 
785-543-4253 Available 
January I 

FEM/ft.£ SUBLEASER 
needed for January- July 
lour- bedroom house 
$300 per month plus one- 
tourth utilities Washer/ 
dryer, dishwasher In- 
cluded 620-271 -2956 

F?MALE SUBLEASER 
needed immediately 

Close to campus, ofl- 
slreet parking. $400 a 
monlh utilities Included. 
913-981-0673 



THE COLLEGIAN cannot 
verity the financial poten- 
tial of advertisements In 
the Employment/Career 
cl*»«lfteallon Reader* 
are advlaed to approach 
any such business oppor- 
tunity with ' rea- 
sonable cau- 
tion. The Collegian urge* 
our reader* to contact the 
Better Buclnea* Bureau, 
501 SE Jefferaon. 
Topeka. KS 66607-1190 
(785)232- 0454. 

4 OLIVE'S Wine Bar now 
hiring lunch cooks. Flexi- 
ble hours, competitive 
pay Apply in person 3033 
Anderson Avenue 







rlelp Wanted 
OecTicn 



D 

Help Wanted 



APPOINTMENT SETTER 
CivicPluj is the nations 
leading provider ol City, 
County and School web- 
sites We have fuN and 
part-time positions In Man- 
hattan with significant In- 
come potential tor the 
right Individual. This posi- 
tion involves calling poten- 
tial clients to setup webi- 
nar appointments. Pay is 
$10/ hour plus $40 tor 
each webmar appoint 
meni you setup full - 
lime benefits Include 
health, dental, paid holi- 
days, paid vacation and 
401 (k) matching Email 
resume in Microsoft Word 
or text format to jobs®- 
civicplus com. 

ARE YOU LOcVlNd FOR 
A CHANGE? DOES DAY 
SHIFT, MO WEEKENDS 
OR HOLIDAYS, AND NO 
CAUL INTEREST YOU? 
We have full-lime CLINIC 
NURSE (RN or LPN) posi- 
tion open in our Pediatric 
otllce. Our ideal candidate 
will be energetic, flexible, 
work well as ■ team mem- 
ber, and have a desire to 
woik In a PROFES- 
SIONAL, COLLABORA- 
TIVE environment Hours 
■I 130am Spin, Mon 
day - Friday Applicant 
musl have a valid unre- 
stricted Kansas nursing li- 
cense, be graduated horn 
a aocradHed nursing pro- 
gram; be la miliar wtth 
ICO-9 coding and auto- 
mated equipment; the abil- 
ity to plan, organize and 
perfrom nursing care; and 
work as team member In 
last paced environment 
Doctor's office experience 
is preferred but not re- 
quired Interested and 
qualified nurses should ap- 
ply to: Geary Community 
Hospital. 1102 Si Mary's 
Road. P.O. Box 490, Junc- 
tion City. KS 66441: email 
cwitt®gchks.org or lax to 
785-236-1700 Equal op- 
portunity employer 

BARTENDING! $300 a 
day potential. No experi- 
ence necessary. Training 
provided Can 

1-800-965-6520 0X1. 144 

CLEANING CREW - Flexi- 
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Services Attendant to per- 
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ing In and around our 
building and grounds. 
Hours are flexible (part 
time, 4 hour shifts or full 
time. 8 hour shirts) All 
shifts occurring between 
10 30pm and 7 00am Sun- 
day through Thursday 
Benefits provided for lull- 
time candidates. High 
school diploma or equrva 
lent, extensive physical ef- 
fort required To apply 
and view our other oppor- 
tunities, please email your 
resume to hill pinegar®tbl- 
lmanaal.com 

EARN $2S00-t monthly 
and more to typs simple 
ads online, wwwdataen- 
trytypers com 



I) 

Help Wanted 



EARN $600 - $3200 a 
month to drive brand new 
car* wtth ads placed on 
them, www AdDrtve Team- 
corn 

GRAPHIC ARTS designer 
assistant Part-time posi- 
tion. $1078 hourly Sub- 
mit by: November 22, 
2006 This entry level posi- 
tion creates posters, flier*, 
brochures, and similar ma- 
terials. Eligible for sick/ an- 
nual leave accrual, 40 IK, 
retirement, and health/ life 
insurance benefits. Re- 
quirements: degree in 
graphic design, art or re- 
lated lield which Involves 
artistic creativity or work 
experience performing the 
duties described above 
Must be knowledgeable ol 
Adobe In Design. Photo- 
shop, and Illustrator soft 
ware Send resume to: 
CPAC/ NAF Branch Fort 
Riley KS Blends Swltter, 
319 Marshall Ave, Fort Ri- 
ley. KS 68442. Fax re- 
sume to: 765-239-3635, 
phone 765-239-2134. 

GRAPHIC DESIGNER 
CMcPlus Is the nations 
leading provider of city, 
county and school web- 
site* Both full-time and 
work-at-home (contract) 
positions are available. 
Full-time benefits include 
health, dental, paid holi- 
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401 (k) matching. Email 
resume and design sam- 
ples lo Joba#civicplus com 

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DISHWASHER NEEOEO. 
Shifts 10am - 3pm on 
Mon-Wed-Fn and/ or 
Tuea-Thurs. Some nlghi 
and/ or weekend availabil- 
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Poynlz Ave Oood Pay 

HELP NEEDED concrete 
mixer drivers lull or part- 
time must have CDL Hs- 
cense can or stop by Val- 
ley Concrete Operations, 
22620 Highway 24 in 
Bervue Kansas 

785-458-6499. Free em- 
ployment drug screening. 
Great lor students looking 
tor part-time work. 
HELP WANTL['i ~ 
Beet Cattle Research Cen- 
ter Contact Man Quinn 
at 765-539-4971 or 
mjqt9kau.edu. 

MYSTERY SHOPPERS 
Earn up to $150 Experi- 
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cover shoppers needed to 
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tablishments Call 
BOO- 722-4791 

PROGRAMMER CIVTC- 
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and school websites Full 
- time position In Manhat- 
tan. Microsoft ASP or 
SQi experience required 
$14 50' hour plus hearth, 
dental, paid holidays, paid 
vacation and 401 (k) 
matching Email resume 
in Microsoft Word or taxi 
toimai to )obs@civicplus - 
com. 

RANDALL'S FORMAL 
Wear is looking lor a part- 
time sales person with out- 
standing customer service 
skills Flexible hours great 
starting wage and commis- 
sion program If you 
would like to join our team 
stop by and lit out an ap- 
plication at 100 Manhat- 
tan Town Center Mall 
785-770-9011 . 



Need a 

Subleaser 



Advertise 

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D 

Hep Wanted 



SALES CIVICPLUS St the 
nations leading provider 
of city, county and school 
websites This lull-time po- 
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significant income poten- 
tial tor Ihe rtght individual 
$24,000 base plus aggres- 
sive commission sched- 
ule Benefits Include 
health, dental, paid holi- 
days, paid vacation and 
401(k) matching. Email 
resume in Microsoft Word 
or text format to fobsO- 
cMopkjsoom 

SO LONG Saloon. Now 
hiring waitresses Apply In 
pereon. 1130 More. Man- 
hattan, KS 

TRAINER CIVICPLUS is 
the nations leading 
provider ol City, county 
and school websites 
This full-time position In- 
volves training end-users 
at both our Manhattan of- 
fice as well at at our client 
sues across the US. Posi- 
tion requires the ability to 
apeak In front of small 
groups and a good under- 
standing ol MS Word 
Benefits indud* heath, 
dental, paid holidays, paid 
vacation and 401 (k) 
matching Email resume 
In Microsoft Word or text 
format to jobsOcMcpluS- 
OOm 

VARNEYS BOOK Store 
la now taking applications 
for temporary part-time 
and temporary lull-time po- 
sitions In the textbook de- 
partment to aaaisi with 
textbook buyback Possi- 
ble employmeni dates are 
Nov 28 - Dec 15 Day- 
time, evening, and week 
end hours are available 
$6.00 pei hour. Involves 
helping customers, moder- 
ate lifting, and cleaning/ 
pricing books. All posi- 
tions require diligence and 
a pleasant, service-on 
ented attitude. College ex- 
perience is strongly pre- 
ferred. Apply in person up- 
stairs in the Textbook 
Dept at Varney's Book 
Store, 823 N. Manhattan 
Ave, Manhattan. KS. 
Deadline lor applications 
is Tuesday. November 21 . 

WEB DESIGNER. Award 

winning advertising 

agency, Imagemakers 

seeks full-time web devel- 
oper/ web designer. Some 
training provided. Apply at 
www wamegoworV com 



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WANTED 

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7 



1 



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C Unified ads must be 
placed by noon the day 
before you want your ed 
to run. Classified display 

ads must be placed by 
4 p.m two working day) 

prtor to the dete you 

want your ad to run. 

CAU 785-532-6555 



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1 DAV 

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Page to 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, Nov. 20, 2006 



Delta Upsilon members bake pumpkin pies for Breadbasket dinner 



By Eric Davit 

KANSAi STATE COLLEGIAN 

The dining room at Delta 
Upsilon was converted into a 
pumpkin pie kitchen Sunday 
night. 

Delta Upsilon's 2006 
pledge class and some of Al- 
pha Delta Pi's new members 
gathered to bake pumpkin 
pies that will be donated for 
the Flint Hills Breadbasket's 
annual Thanksgiving dinner 

Robert Flack, sophomore 
in political science, helped 
organize the event It was 
planned as a philanthropy 
for the fraternity's pledge 
class to satisfy a requirement 
for initiation 

"We will be taking the pies 
to the Breadbasket tomor- 



row. The dinner is not un- 
til Thursday, though," Flack 
said as he moved boxes of pie 
crusts and pumpkin pie fill- 
ing around the dining room. 

Flack said each member 
of the 2006 DU pledge class 
will make a pie. 

"We are expecting to make 
about 30 pies, and that will 
be about one for each pledge 
that we have," he said 

"I think that (the Bread- 
basket) is expecting 500 or 
more people at the dinner, so 
we should have enough pies 
to last." 

ADPi members did not 
help plan the event, but DU 
members recruited them to 
help bake the pies. 

The Flint Hills Breadbas- 
ket annually organizes and 



puts on the dinner. It is still 
looking for help in the form 
of donations and manpower 
for the event. 

According to the Bread- 
basket's Web site, there are 
several ways students can 
help. 

Donations, food and de- 
livery drivers are all needed 
to make the evening a suc- 
cess. 

The dinner, which lasts 
from noon to 2 p.m. on 
Thursday, is free to all those 
in the Manhattan communi- 
ty 

It will take place on the 
Manhattan High School east 
campus. 

Those who want more in- 
formation about the event 
can call (785) 537-0730. 




itwhrtmi | murafi 

Brett Ragan, freshman in open option, and Kyi* Williams, freshman In marketing mix together 
pumpkin pie Ingredients Sunday evening at the Delta Upsilon chapter house. 



Gallery exhibit showcases dozens of teapots, prints by Kansas artists 



By Natasha Mayers 

KANSAi STATE COLLEGIA* 

Here is the handle, and here 
is the spout, but otherwise, 
these don't look like ordinary 
teapots. Each is distinguish- 
able in color, shape and size. 

Dozens of teapots are on 
display as a part of the "Plea- 
sures: Prints and Teapots by 
Kansas Artists" exhibit at 
Strecker -Nelson Gallery 

Ester Ikeda, former Man- 
hattan Arts Center instructor, 
and Yoshiro Ikeda, professor 
of art, both have teapots in the 
exhibit. Ester said she and her 
husband each have a different 
sculpting technique. 

"He likes rough, very dry 
(teapots)" Ester said "You 
can't use it. His is more of a 
sculpture. Mine is of a form. 
You can use it for tea, water or 
coffee," 

She said her pieces also ex- 
hibit more design than Yoshi- 
ro' s 

Ester said only eight of 10 
of her ceramic pieces regularly 
survive the entire pottery pro- 
cess without breaking. How- 
ever, she said she still enjoys 
pottery because it is a project 
that anyone can do, regardless 
of appearance. 

"Anybody can do it - ugly 
or beautiful," Ester said 

She said she also likes the 
challenge that comes in sculpt- 
ing clay pieces 



Need something 
to do? 



Try 
SuDoku 



Located on the 
classified page 



sudoku 





kstatecolIegian.com 



"It's soft and can mold any 
way you want it to mold," Es- 
ter said "It seems easy, but it is 
hard." 



Angel o C Garzio, a for- 
mer K- State professor, said he 
feels pottery is what made him 
who he is today. When he was 



atS."* 


1 .jjA 1 


at 




— _. . ^^^amm 



Catrlna R*w*on | COLLEGIAN 

Artwork by K-State faculty is being featured at the Strecker -Nelson 
Gallery. The exhibit includes teapots and prints. 



\ PATS PAWN & GUN SHOP, INC. 




in school at the University of 
Iowa, he took courses to earn 
his doctorate so he could be- 
come an art history professor. 

To do so, he had to learn 
German, Latin and Hungar- 
ian. Garzio said Hungarian 
was the most difficult to learn. 

To relieve the associated 
stress, he enrolled in a ceram- 
ics class, because he had heard 
excellent feedback about the 
course. There, Garzio finally 
found his passion, he said, but 
he decided to earn his degree 
anyway. 

"It's a part of my being. 
If I weren't making pots. 1 
wouldn't be alive," Garzio 
said. 



yfax transmission 
& reception service 



{jaflin Jloci* and f>/>J< 



Like Ester, Garzio said he 
finds joy in the challenge of 
the task and hopes his pottery 
will be used accordingly. 

"I would like to think that 
they would be used by a fel- 
low man with gentle care and 
love," Garzio said 

The exhibit also displayed 
a number of prints, including 
etchings, lithographs or mono- 
types. 

When Rachel Melis, as- 



sistant professor of art, was 
asked by the gallery's owners, 
Barbara and Jay Nelson, to 
show her she prints, she said 
she felt honored 

"It is an honor to be asked 
to be in a Strecker- Nelson 
show, because the gallery has 
an excellent reputation and 
because the owners choose 
thoughtful and thought- 
provoking themes for their 
shows," Melis said. 



ATTFNTIHN 

faulty ..Stall 

Are you a (acuity member thai is haying your provider eliminated in the 
We give nliiRdivfi advice Im Hie transition 

Ki.jmici Capital Mdruirjui i i 



MON-FRI9irn.-6p.rn 

SAT 9 i.m -Span. 



GUNS 

SMITH & WESSON 

HANDGUNS . RIFLES 

COLT . RUGER 

SHOTGUNS 



I SO* Mey Si • Ojdcn 
5)9-0ISI 





ER & EMPLOYMENT SERVICES 
We're thankful for: 

^record number of activated eftecruiting account t 

Advocacy of student government 

2.420 oncampus interviews 

Walk-in Wednesday participants 

Career fair success 

Support from corporate 

sponsors for enhanced facility 

Thanks for making this a 

great semester! 

t#faW tfV Et^plVf^MI HryltfaM 

BnaaMn1MlMl% 
wo mi ik 



Guiding You from College to Career 




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i 







KANSAS STATE 




INSIDE 

Shamekia Kirklin 
brings a world of 
experience to 

K- State's dance team 

S*« story P»g« 6 




vrww.kstatccoUegian.com 



Monday, November 27, 2006 



VoLlll.Na67 



Holiday season 



Santa visits bus 




Photoi by Ch riitopt>*r H«n«wtnck»l | COLLEGIAN 

Hannah Parker, I, cries while sitting on Santa's lap. Her mom. Ken, tries to get her to stop crying for the picture. Children can visit Santa at the Manhattan Town 
Center from now until Christmas. 

Area residents shop for bargains, 
share wish lists over the weekend 

By Megan Molrtor 

KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

Manhattan residents whispered their wishes to Santa 
and fulfilled those of others on their list this week- 
end at Manhattan Town Center. 

Santa Claus made appearances at the mall Saturday and 
Sunday, much to the delight of children of all ages. He visited 
with children from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Saturday and 12-6 
p.m. on Sunday. 

He posed for pictures with all who sat on his lap and 
handed out reindeer hats. 

Many younger children said they loved the chance to tell 
Santa what they want for Christmas 

Four year-old Brayden Webb said he thought talking to 
Santa was fun. 

"I asked him all about presents and told him 1 wanted toys 
and trucks" he said 

See MAIL Pants 




Santa tries to get Jon Grave, 4, to tell him what he wants for Christmas. Jon and his sister 
Katy, 6, were the first In line to visit Sama Friday morning. 



Democrats to propose reinstating draft 



By Mike Kelly 

KANSAS STATE CQLIKI AN 

The United States' voluntary mil- 
itary could be spread dangerously 
thin by its current and possible fu- 
ture military endeavors, according 
to some Democratic lawmakers. 

Some believe the best way to ac- 
quire new troops is to reinstate the 
draft. 

"If we're going to challenge Iran 
and North Korea, as some people 
have asked, and send even more 
troops into Iraq, we can't do that 
without a draft," said Rep. Charles 
Rangel, D-N.Y, a veteran of the Ko- 
rean War 



Once the Democrats take con- 
trol of the House Ways and Means 
Committee in January, legislation of- 
ficially will be put forward. 

Rangel, the next chairman of the 
Ways and Means Committee, said he 
sees this idea as a way to deter poli- 
ticians from launching unnecessary 
wars. 

"There's no question in my mind 
that this president and this admin- 
istration would never have invad- 
ed Iraq, especially on the flimsy 
evidence that was presented to the 
Congress, if indeed we had a draft 
and members of Congress and the 
administration thought that their 
kids from their communities would 



be placed in harm's way," Rangel 
said 

Conscription into national service 
would come with a choice Those 
who would agree to military training 
and service that could place them 
directly in harm's way still would do 
so voluntarily. 

Front-line soldiers and sailors 
would get the current highly special- 
ized training and higher pay Others 
would serve in non-combat support 
roles or in domestic service. 

Rangel has introduced similar 
legislation in the past. 

Earlier this year, he offered a plan 
to mandate military service for men 
and women between ages 16 and 42. 



However, the bill saw little action in 
the Republic an -led Congress. 

"I don't see how anyone can sup- 
port the war and not support the 
draft," Rangel said "I think to do so 
is hypocritical." 

Republican Congressional leader- 
ship, for the most part, agrees there 
is not enough of a troop presence in 
Iraq but believes instituting a draft is 
a move in the wrong direction 

"I think we can do this with an 
all-voluntary service, all-voluntary 
Army, Air Force, Marine Corps and 
Navy," said Sen Lindsey Graham, R- 
S.C. "And if we can't, then we'll look 

See DRAFT Page 7 




Gr«*ft 

ISTAIfGRAWJArt 



Cattracker 

accident 

victim 

identified 



By Jonas Hogg 

KANSAS STATE COt LtGI AN 

K-State graduate John Prosser 
Green of Shawnee, Kan., has been 
identified as the man killed in the 
Nov, 18 Cattracker accident in 
Lawrence. 

Green is survived by his wife, 
Samantha, who is expecting a 
child in January. Hit parents also 
survive. 

Green gradu- 
ated from K- 
State in 2002 and 
served as vice 
noble ruler of Al- 
pha Gamma Rho 
fraternity and 
president of Golf 
Course Superin- 
tendents Associa- 
tion of America, 
KSU Student Chapter. 

Ronnie Pope, president of AG R, 
said the fraternity has expressed its 
sympathies to Green's wife, par- 
ents and parents-in-law. 

Funeral services were at 10:30 
am Nov. 22 at the First Presbyte- 
rian Church in Leoti, Kan. 

Contributions to the John P. 
Green Memorial Education Fund 
can be given to the the funeral 
home. 

Condolences may be sent to 
pricefh@wbsnet.org. 



2 events 
mark start 
of season 



By MtQftn MOMf 

KANSAS STATE COUEGIAN 

LIGHTED PARADE 

The Mayor's Spirit of the Holiday 
Lighted Parade begins at 6 p.m. to- 
day. All entries will be lit somehow. 

The procession will begin at 
Manhattan Town Center and pro- 
ceed along Poyntz Avenue, ending 
at Triangle Park in Aggjeville where 
there will be a tree-lighting ceremo- 
ny. Santa Claus will bring up the rear 
of the parade in a lighted buggy 

The parade benefits the Flint 
Hills Breadbasket 

LIGHTING UP MANHATTAN 

Entries for Lighting Up the Little 
Apple, a campus-wide holiday light- 
ing competition, are due today. 

Students can enter with their res- 
idence halls, houses, apartments or 
greek organizations to compete for 
prizes, including Pepsi products and 
merchandise from area stores. 

Decorations must be completed 
by Wednesday Voting will take 
place Dec. 5 and 6, and the win- 
ners will be announced Dec. 8. For 
more information or to register, go 
to www.k-stale.e4u/osas, or call the 
Office of Student Activities and Ser- 
vices at (785) 532-6541. 



• a* 



Today's forecast 

Showers 
High: 64 Low: 52 



INSIDE 

Hustle for Huggins 

After watching four ofnis starters fait to hustle 
(town the court on a fast-break opportunity, 
coach Bob Huggins brought in four new players. 
H( used 13 different players to beat Coppin State 
68 57 Set story Page 5 



CAMPUS NEWS HIGHLIGHTS 



Commencement 

Today is the last day for graduate 
students to confirm online they 
will attend December commence- 
ment The commencement will be 
Dec 8 at K- State for the Graduate 
School and K- State Salina. It will 
be Dec. 9 for all other schools. 
For more information, visit 
www.k-itatt, edu/itgiitm/(_d/ 
Falt2006fdf. 



Agriculture students 

>usbneSter1mg,s*iwinaaflcur»jral 
corrmunkat»nsar^j<wmafcm,arKi 
Lauren Smith, senior to agronomy, 
were named agriculture students 
o* the morrow September and 
October, respectwrty, on the basts 
of honors they have received, their 
one-page resume, the* activities, 
thei grade point iverage and short 
essays they submitted 



Animal sciences 

Ken Odd? has been named the 
head of the Department of Animal 
Science and Industry. He will begin 
his position Feb. 26. He has been 
a professor and director of the 
Beef Systems (enter of Excellence 
at North Dakota State University 
since June 2005. 



National heathcare 

In the current poll. 69 percent of respondents say the federal oowmment his 
the responsibility to provide healthcare to those who do not have it 



I 

I 

I 

i 



% res, should provide 
% No, should not 



100 

80 
60 
40 
20 



S9% 


64% 


S8% 


69% 


39% 


34% 


38% 


28% 



2003 2004 2005 2006 



Page 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, Nov. 27, 2006 



ftaflin J$oofa and fppiti 



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29 Auto 
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32 Southern 
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37 Fame 

40 Sauce 
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44 Run-down 
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45 Literary 
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46 Halluci- 
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letters 



CAMPUS CHRONICLES 

Headlines from other universities 



U.FLORIDA TO RETIRE 
IRREPARABLE MASCOT 

GAINESVILLE, Pla - In 
the dilemma over repairing Ollie 
Gator, the inflatable mascot at 
women's volleyball and basket- 
ball games, the University Ath- 
letic Association has decided to 
"move in a different direction." 

For Ollie, it's toward the 
bright end of the tunnel. 

Martin Salamone, UAA mar- 
keting director, said the UAA has 
no plans to restore Ollie, who 
first appeared on University of 
Florida's sidelines about 10 years 
ago 

Ollie is admired by fans for 



his spunk. He adds pizzazz to 
the games with stunts like stand- 
ing on his head and popping his 
limbs in and out. 

The motor-powered Ollie 
suit malfunctioned before the 
preseason basketball sbow Mid- 
night Madness on Oct. 13, and 
the problems proved too severe 
to repair. • 

UCLA MIGHT GET GRANT 
FOR STEM-CELL RESEARCH 

LOS ANGELES - Embryonic 
stem-cell research at University 
of California-Los Angeles might 
soon get a boost with new grants 
by the California Institute for Re- 



generative Medicine. 

The amount of money UCLA 
will receive will not be deter- 
mined until early 2007. 

In 2005 the UCLA Institute 
for Stem Cell Biology and Medi- 
cine received a $375 million 
grant, which is more than any 
other research institution in Cali- 
fornia received 

COLUMBIA U. STUDENTS 
OPT FORTHEMED PARTIES 

NEW YORK - Columbia 
University might not be known 
for its keg stands and weekend- 
long bashes, but it has given birth 
to its share of party planners. 



It was here, after all, that the 
likes of immaculate hostess-ex 
tru ordinaire Martha Stewart got 
their start. 

Lately though, Columbia 
students could be giving hosts 
of yore a run for their money. 
Theme parties have become 
more and more popular in suites 
and residence hall rooms - stu- 
dents say the more intricate the 
theme, the better. 

"The best themes get people 
talking about each other," senior 
Cliff Morton said. "But it has to 
be easy to execute." 

Source: www.iofiybojf.eom 



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The planner 

Campus bulletin board 



11-27 



CHYPTOQMP 



Kl. BQW UOA SGXKQWDZB 

YQ7.QXCA TWGXAD YQSCXKFT 

BQWX YGX PUCCZD, PQV/ZA 

BQW MC G LCFACX MZCFACX7 
Yesterday's Cryptequip: ID LIKE TO SEE THE 
ZOOLOGICAL B(X)K AROUT AFRICAN LIZARDS 
TITLED "GHANA IGUANA FAUNA." 

Today'* Cryploquip Clue: B equals Y 



The planner is the Collegian's tampus bulletin board service. 
Items in the calendar can be published up to three times. 
Items might not appear because of space constraints bul are 
guaranteed to appear on the day of the activity, fo place an 
item in the (smpus Calendar, stop by Kedzie 1 16 and fill out a 
form of e-mail the news editor at (olltgian@ipub.kiu.tdu by 
1 1 a.m. two days before it is to run 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral 
defense of the doctoral dissertation of Kathryn Brook-, at 9 
am. today in Bluemont 368. 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral de- 
fense of the doctoral dissertation of Karina Fabriai at 12:30 
p.m. today in Throckmorton 2002. 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral 
defense of the doctoral dissertation of Furaha Mramba at 1 
p.m. today in Waters 129. 



■ The Graduate School announces the final oral 
defense of the doctoral dissertation of Rim Nay a I it 9 a.m. 
Tuesday in Fiedler 21 16. 

■ Teach for America will have an informational meet- 
ing It a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday in the K -State Student Union 
Food Court. 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral it- 
f ense of the doctoral diwrtai ion ol Chan itchoteOetvisit 
sakun at 9 a.m. Wednesday in Ackert 324, 

■ Business Study Abroad Advocates will meet at 4:10 
p.m. Wednesday in Calvin 21 1 for an end-of-the-semester 
social. 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral de- 
fense of the doctoral dissertation of Peng lu at 2 p.m. Friday 
in Durland 1029. 



The blotter | Arrests in Rifey County online at wivw.fofflfeco/fep/rj/j.com. 



Corrections and 
clarifications 

(orrecfiins and darifationsfun in this space. 
If you ■ something that shouM be corrected, 
oil newTedrtof ceann Sutenat (785) 532- 
6556 or e-mail coflfawH»spon tei/.erim 



Kansas State Collegian 

(USPS 291 020) The Kansas State Collegian, a 
student newspaper at Kansas State University, 
is published by Student Publications Inc. 
Kedzs 103, Manhattan, KS 66506. The Col- 
legian h published weekdays during the school 
year and on Wednesdays durmgthe summer 
Periodical postage is paid at Manhattan, KS 
66502. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to 
Kansas State Collegian, circulation desk, Kedae 
103, Manhattan, KS66S06-7167 
O Kansas State CoUegun, 2006 '.' 



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Monday, Nov. 27, 2006 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 3 



Photographic record 






mte. 



& 



K ta«ii«tiww«»» 




PtKrto. by Oirktophw HwwwMdwt | COUtfilAH 
e houMt with composites hang them In a formal room or a main entrance to the house SO 
guests can see who the current members are. 

Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority has membership records dating back to before the 1930s. Before compos- 
ites were framed, like they are now, Kappa kept the records In scrapbooks. 



Fraternities, sororities display composite boards of members' pictures as annual archive 



By Krittin Hodg.. 

KANSAS STATE COtliGIAN 

In most greek houses, a 
compilation of members' 
pictures hang for all to see. 
However, the details of the 
composites differ from house 
to house. 

Rachel Strouts. Panhel- 
lenic Council president, said 
greek houses use their yearly 
composites as a chapter re- 
cord of members. 

Although Greek Affairs 



does not have an official rote 
with the composites, it indi- 
rectly deals with them, like 
when photographers contact 
the office to inform the chap- 
ters about their business, 
Strouts said. 

It is the chapter that 
choose what photographer 
or company makes the com- 
posite. 

Ian Hartsig. treasurer for 
Phi Kappa Theta, said his 
fraternity received its com- 
posite about a month ago. 



He said the layout of 
the composite is consistent 
through the years, and mem- 
bers wear the same tuxedo 
and tie, which belong to the 
house. 

The composites from 
years past hang on the walls 
throughout the house, Hart- 
sig said. 

"We try to put a pretty 
good representation of years 
past" he said. "It's fun to see 
how the former alumni look 
and what offices they held." 



Hartsig said security for 
his house's composite is the 
same as the security for the 
house. 

He said there is not a spe- 
cific way members secure the 
composite, but they try to 
make sure there are always 
people around the house. 

Strouts said when com- 
posites are stolen from chap- 
ter houses, Greek Affairs 
contacts chapter presidents 
to help in returning the com- 
posite to its proper owner. 



"Our main role in that is 
to encourage respect," she 
said. "If a chapter ever has 
a problem with their com- 
posite going missing, we can 
help them recover it." 

Jamie Settle, member of 
Kappa Alpha Theta, said the 
composites hang in differ- 
ent locations in each greek 
house, but her sorority has 
its most current composite in 
its front foyer, 

Theta's activities chair se- 
lects what the women wear 



in the photographs, Settle 
said. 

She said the women have 
worn the same outfits for 
the last few years, but in the 
put, they each chose their 
own. 

She said members can buy 
their picture that is used for 
the composite if they want to 
do so. 

"It's just like yearbook or 
high school pictures," she 
said. "You can always buy 
your own." 




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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, Nov. 27, 2006 



If he did it 




O.J. Simpsons book, interview might aim to generate 
'blood money^ but poor publicity only opens old wounds 




BECKY 
STEINERT 



Muttrationt by Elvis Achtlpohl | COLLFGIAN 



Lately, O.J. Simpson has sounded 
like "Chicago" songstress Vetma 
KeUy: 

"1 didn't do it, but if I'd done 
it..." 

More than a de- 
cade after the mur- 
ders of his ex-wife, 
Nicole Brown, and 
her friend Ronald 
Goldman, Simpson 
decided the time 
has come to remind 
everyone of the 
brutal, unspeakable 
acts of cruelty of which he was ac- 
cused. 

With the help of a ghostwriter, 
Simpson recently finished a book 
titled "If I Did It," a work that 
describes how he would have com- 
mitted the double homicide, if he 
had done so, though Simpson still 
adamantly denies involvement in 

the crime. 

In an interview with The Associ- 
ated Press, Simpson said, "I made 
it clear from the first day I met the 
writer that I wasn't involved. 1 said, 
'I have nothing to confess.'" 

In a case of shockingly bad taste, 
Fox made plans to air on television 
an interview with Simpson about 
the book, again explaining how he 
could have carried out the murder 
of his ex-wife, had he been respon- 
sible. Thanks to public outcry, both 



the release of the book and the 
airing of the interview have been 
cancelled. 

Broadcasting to the world that 
one does, in (act, know a good plan 
to murder one's wife does not ease 
suspicions. 

Hie statement, "Yeah, I know of 
a way it could have been done ... 
but 1 didn't do it," is highly ques- 
tionable Speaking hypothetically 
(as seems to be the fashion nowa- 
days), let's suggest O J actually is 
innocent on all counts and perhaps 
has innocently and inadvertantly 
formulated a workable way of com- 
mitting the crime on his own. Gen 
eral societal rules dictate that in this 
case, the homicidal plot should be 
kept to oneself. For O.J. especially, 
this option should be preferred over 
stirring up old fires. 

Treating the brutal murder of 
one's ex-wife in this manner is high- 
ly suspect. Using it to gain publicity 
and money bring to mind words like 
"cold-blooded, sociopathic monster" 
more often than "grieving widower." 

In the AP interview, Simpson 
specifically said the book and TV 
interview were for the purpose of 
making money 

"This was an opportunity for my 
kids to get their financial legacy ... I 
made it clear that it's blood money," 
he said. 

Well, when he puts it that way, 



what choice did he have? Other 
than not capitalizing on the stab- 
bing of his children's mother, that is 

Regardless of Simpson's guilt 
or innocence, this is a horrendous 
example of exploitation. The crime 
is treated with none of the respect 
and gravity it deserves. 

At a press conference, Fox CEO 
Rupert Murdoch said, "1 and senior 
management agree with the Ameri- 
can public that this was an ill-con- 
sidered project." 

Indeed it was, and despite the 
concession, the fact the idea ever 
grew out of its infancy speaks 
unfavorably of Murdoch and the 
Fox network (thereby tarnishing its 
sterling reputation). 

It is clear the desire of networks 
to raise the shock value has gotten 
out of hand Perhaps we* should 
revert to the days of the Roman 
Coliseum and laugh as humans are 
eaten alive. Cruel, yes, but think of 
the ratings. 

The detrimental value of "If 1 Did 
It" to O.J.'s name is trumped only 
by its disgraceful nature Clearly 
Fox has some reviewing of decency 
standards to do, and O.J. needs to 
brush up on his defense tactics. 



Becky Stelnert Is a freshman In psychology. 
Please send comment! to opinion a ipttb.kw 
edit. 



Say 'thank you' often to show gratitude for others' role in your life 




KELSEY 
CHILDRESS 



After celebrating Thanksgiv- 
ing on Thursday and talking to a 
co-worker this week, I came to the 
revelation that no 
one says "thank 
you" anymore 

Even if a person 
does say thank 
you, it is usually 
not meaningful but 
merely out of habit. 
My co-worker 
told me he never 
sends thank you 
cards because he thinks giving a 
gift should be selfless, and the giver 
should not expect a thank you. 

This is simply not true It is al- 
ways nice to be appreciated. Many 
times, it makes people realize their 
efforts are not in vain, that what 
they do deserves some respect and 
gratification Just because a person 
does someone a favor or gives a gift 
does not mean he or she does not 
need to receive a thank you. 

Sometimes a gift makes the giver 
feel better than the person receiv- 
ing it, especially if this is the giver's 
way of showing his or her own 
gratitude. Many times a gift can be 
unmerited. However, it is important 
to be thankful for everything that is 
given in life 



It is important to show people 
in your life you care. Just because 
the obligatory thank you is given 
doesn't mean the person really 
knows how touching the gift or 
favor was. 

Sometimes it is hard to admit 
you need another person, but that 
doesn't mean people should be 
above showing gratitude, because 
this is one of the most important 
gifts that can be given. 

There are always so 
many things we wish we 
could have said to those 
loved ones who have 
left our life, whether 
intentionally or in a 
hurry No one should 
waste time with 
empty thank you's 
and broken prom- 
ises of reciprocity Life 
shouldn't be filled with 
regrets, and this also 
means there needs to 
be certain messages of 
admiration to those spe- 
cial people before it 
is too late and time 
doesn't allow it 

Sending thank 
you notes or flowers or 
picking up that cheesy 



dollar item from the bargain bin 
that recalls an inside joke are all 
special ways to honor vital rela- 
tionships with friends and family 
that create a supportive net that is 
always there in crises. 

Too many times these people are 
taken for granted and eventually 
might become tired of constantly 
giving while others constantly take. 

In a world where it is nearly 



impossible to be totally indepen- 
dent - most of the time we all 
depend on others for the food we 
eat and the money we make - the 
importance of gratitude must not 
be forgotten. 

Even if it might sound fool- 
ish and out of the ordinary, call 
a person who has done a million 
favors or a nosy (but concerned) 
relative and tell this person how 



much his or her efforts have meant. 
This small act is probably easier 
than what this person did for you. 
Besides, it's always comforting to 
know someone on this big, scary 
planet cares about you. 



Ke lity Childress Is a Junior in English and 
women's studies. Pleise email comments to 
opinion sspub.ksu. tdu. 




AjOjt 



Ac 



KANSAS STATE 

? COLLEGIAN 

ImHy Uwnnct | EGUM IK CHIEF 

Kwry Rtchw | MMMIMO EBI'Ot 

Iwnn Sulnn | NEWS i0"0» 

A boy BrownbMk | COPY CMiEf 

M*«*n Motor | CltYTOt EDITOI 

KitDtan Rodorick | UMPUS f OHOl 

Anthony Mtndotl 1 5MMTS EDUOt 

Annott* ImHni | THE EDGE EDITOI 

Own Konnotfy | OPINION SDITO* 

ZoclwyT, fckolt | Pit SI nhi ION EDITOI 

Stnon Doll | PHOTO E0IIOI 

Aoyc* htaynot | ONLINE 101 It* 

logon C Adami | PueuC EOrrot 

Kdly WllHami | *D <UNM.fi 

Courtney Steypon | ASM »0 munauh 



WRITE TO US 

The Collegian welcomes your letters to the editor 
They can be submitted by e-mail to Itttmpspitb. 
teu.edu, Of in person to Kedrie 116. Please include 
your full name, year in school and major Letters 
should be limited to 250 words. All submitted 
letters may be edited for length and clarity. 

CONTACT US 

Kansas State Cof legtan 
KmU* 10) Manhattan, KS 66502 

Display ads |78S) 532-6560 

Classified ads....(785}S32-6555 

Mrwry (78S1SW-65SS 

Newsf»om........{78S)SJ2^5M 

I bu.edu 



TH TUP PfilMT t * n •° , *K> ri * 1 selected and debated by the editorial board and written after a majority 
I \J I fit TV/in I I opinion is formed. This is the Collegian's official opinion. 



Reasoning 
makes sense, 

College students and 
young people today have a 
lot to worry about: school, 
relationships, money, jobs. 
But 40 years ago, young 
Americans had an addition- 
al burden on their minds: 
the military draft. 

The draft ended in the 
1970s, and we are fortunate 
we are no longer required 
to put ourselves in harm's 
way when the country 
deems it necessary. How- 
ever, a New York Congress- 
man has proposed rein- 
stating a draft for national 



behind reinstating draft 
but idea meets opposition 



service; his recommenda- 
tion has been met with 
fierce opposition. 

Democratic Rep. Charles 
Rangel's reasoning is admi- 
rable and often overlooked. 
Rangel believes that if poli- 
ticians had loved ones serv- 
ing unwillingly in the mili- 
tary, our government would 
not be so quick to start and 
continue costly wars. 

We, as an editorial board, 
could not reach a consen- 
sus on one single position 
in regard to a draft, but we 
agree with Rangel's reasons 



and justification. 

With a draft, the situa- 
tion in Iraq would become 
something that affects more 
Americans directly rather 
than something we see in 
the news. 

A draft might not be the 
way to achieve the goal of 
making politicians think 
before they vote, but Ran- 
gel has made us discuss the 
subject, which is a start. 
We, as Amercians, have a 
responsibility to care about 
our military; Rangel has 
reminded us of this. 



CAMPUS FOURUM 
395-4444 - or - 

fourum@spab.ksu.edu 

The Campus Fourum is the Collegian's anonymous 
call-in system, The Fourum Is edited to eliminate 
vulgar, racist, obscene and libelous comments. 
The comments are not the opinion of the Col- 
legian nor are they endorsed by the editorial staff 

You said you were full! 

1 90I in a fight this weekend with a staircase, 

and it definitely kicked my butt. 

My new glrrfrt end is hotter than the old one. 

rfiOKI'mamop. 

DM you just call a plant a freshman? 

I don't cart If ttvey like it In Kansas. 

'Thespian' Is a funny word. 

My girlfriend stole my phone so I couldn't call 
the Fourum. 



Need more Fourum r Go to 
wwwJatatt t alhf l an.am for the full version. 



.1 



>. 

1. 



i 



9 



SPORTS 



Monday, Nov. 27, 2006 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Team gives senior Werner 
send-off in sweep of KU 



By Austin Ma«k 
KANSAS STATKQUKMN 

The question was posed to coach 
Suae Fritz a few weeks ago, with the 
K-State volleyball squad headed for its 
worst record in more than a decade. 

What's left to play for? 

Fritz said the team wanted to send 
its only senior, Sandy Werner, out on a 
good note. 

That's exactly what happened Sat- 
urday night, as Werner notched the fi- 
nal kill to give K-State a 3-0 (30-16, 30- 
14, 30-28) sweep of Kansas at Aheam 
Field House. 

Wemer, who finished her career 
with 1,109 kills, led K-State with 12 on 
Saturday But it was her last kill that 
had everyone talking. 

"It was very appropriate As many 
kills as Sandy had in her career, it's ap- 



propriate that she goes out with one," 
Fritz said. 

The kill, which came on a set by 
Megan Fan, gave K-State a come 
from -behind victory in game three. 

"So many things went through my 
head," Fair said "1 was going to take 
the easy one and set (Kelsey) Chip- 
man, but 1 had to set Sandy, because I 
knew she'd get the kill." 

Though the season has had its upa 
and downs, Wemer said she couldn't 
have asked for a better ending. 

"It's the perfect way to end my ca- 
reer, beating KU," she said. "We came 
out on fire." 

Indeed, K-State (1248. 4-16 Big 12 
Conference) dominated early in the 
match, building big leads in games one 
and two. A strung service game helped 
the Wildcats take control early 

For the match, K-State recorded a 




CMttOph*r Han«wlnck*l | COUEMN 

Senior Sandy Warner, No. 6, and other members of the volleyball team celebrate its 
3-0 win over Kansas on Saturday. 



season-high 15 aces, five more than 
the previous season high. Eight of 
those aces came in game two 

"Our plan was to serve tough," said 
junior setter Stacey Spiegefberg, who 
has nine aces in her last two matches 
"We didn't expect to get that many 
aces, but it just helped us win and get 
that confidence." 



K-State also recorded 22 block as- 
sists, breaking the single-season record 
set by last year's squad. 

With the win, K State earned back- 
to -back victories for the first time in 
conference play and moved out of last 
place in the Big 12. Kansas, which fin- 
ished 3 17 in conference play and 10- 
19 overall, is now last 




AUSTIN 
MEEK 



Glitz, glamour 

ofSoCalfitOJ. 
like a glove 

Forty years after O.J. Simpson 
rewrote the record books at South- 
ern California and a few months 
after he wrote the 
would be American 
classic "If 1 Did 
H," another O.J. is 
making headlines 
in SoCal. 
O.J. Mayo, once 
the centerpiece of 
a troika of high- 
profile basketball 
■ recruits linked to 
K-State coach Bob Huggins, signed 
a Letter of Intent at USC, putting to 
rest any rumors that he would com- 
mit to K-State. 

Mayo is a 6-foot-5 point guard 
who scores 30 points per game, 
even though his former high school 
coach said he's more of a passer 
than a scorer. He was a first-team 
all -state selection ... as an eighth- 
grader. He's deadly from three- 
point range and unstoppable off the 
dribble Mayo and K-State signee 
Bill Walker were best friends and 
teammates at Cincinnati's North 
College Hill High School. Mayo has 
LeBron James on speed-dial. 

So why aren't K-State fans a little 
more disappointed Mayo chose to 
take his services elsewhere? 

To begin, USC has been at the 
top of Mayo's list for months, so it's 
no surprise he opted to become a 
Trojan. 

Also, K-State secured commit- 
ments from Walker and Michael 
Beasley, the other two recruits in 
Huggie's holy trinity Mayo would 
have been a nice addition, but - in 
the immortal words of Meatloaf 
- "two out of three ain't bad" 

But here's the biggest reason 
K-State fans shouldn't mourn the 
loss of Mayo: Manhattan, like the 
bloody glove, is just loo small for 
O.J. 

Mayo has been groomed to be 
an NBA superstar, billed as the next 
LeBron. His college career will be 
little more than a glorified NBA 
tryout. 

Mayo and his family seem to take 
a business-like approach to young 
O.J.'s progression toward NBA 
stardom Signing with USC was a 
calculated business decision, a way 
to ensure Mayo spends plenty of 
time in front of TV cameras. With 
the Lakers playing just down the 
street, Mayo knows he'll get maxi- 
mum exposure in Los Angeles. 

"Coach (Tim) Floyd has been 
an NBA coach, and the city of Los 
Angeles is a great marketing city," 
Mayo told ESPN.com. "Hopefully, if 
everything goes well, I can market 
myself better for the next level" 

Mayo watched USC football 
players Matt Leinart and Reggie 
Bush achieve movie-star status and 
nab fat NFL contracts, a factor that 
clearly influenced his decision. 

"It's a perfect situation," Mayo 
told USA Today. "After players like 

SeeiMAiOPaget 



The right mix 




Left: Lane* 
Harris drives 
to the basket 
against 
Coppin State. 
Harris led the 
Wildcats in 
scoring with 
26 points. 

B«low:S»nior 
Carrier Martin 

pulls up for 
a 3- pointer 
during the 
second half 
Saturday. 
Martin 
became the 
19th player in 
K-State history 
to score 1,000 
or more career 
points. 

Chrtitoptor 

H*n«wlnck«f 
(OUtGIAN 



Huggins uses 13 different players in 68-57 victory 



By Jonathan Garten 
KANSAS STATE COtLEGtAN 

Coach Bob Huggins made 
al least one point clear during 
K-State's 68-57 win over Coppin 
State Saturday night at Bramlage 
Coliseum. 

Either his players will hustle, or 
find themselves on the bench. 




It didn't take long for most of 
the starting line-up to figure this 
out About three minutes into the 
game, junior guard Blake Young 
made a steal and brought the ball 
across the floor only to miss a 
I ay up on the offensive end 

The problem wasn't Young's 
missed layup; it was that none of 
his teammates followed him to 
the other side of the court. Sure 
enough, Huggins benched those 
four players the first opportunity 
he got. 

"We're going to play hard," Hug- 
gins said. "We may miss shots and 
do any of that other stuff, but we're 
going to play hard." 

Young led the Wildcats in min- 
utes with 35, despite missing all 
eight of his shots from the field 
and finishing the game with only 
two points. Huggins said it was 
Young's intensity that kept him on 
the floor. 

"He is the only guy that I can re 
member that has picked up a loose 
ball," Huggins said. "He hasn't 
made any shots, but tell me some- 
body who has." 

Huggins continued to mix up his 
rotation for the rest of the game. 
By about midway through the first 



half he had used 13 different play- 
ers. 

Freshman walk on guard Chris 
Merrie wether and junior walk-on 
guard Ryan Patzwald both reached 
season highs in minutes. Sopho- 
more forward Deilvez Year by also 
played more than he had in previ- 
ous games 

Several players subbed into the 
game only to be benched less than 
30 seconds later. Freshman for- 
ward Luis Colon was benched after 
14 seconds of play midway through 
the second half. 

Huggins took Colon out of the 
game after he committed an offen- 
sive foul. Colon threw his head- 
band down on his way back to his 
seat and didn't return to the game. 

Even senior forward Carrier 
Martin found himself constantly 
checking in and out of the game. 
With 7 1/2 minutes to play and 
the Wildcats leading 46-45, Martin 
took a seat on the bench with only 
two points. He didn't have time to 
get comfortable before he was put 
back in 10 seconds later 

From that point on Martin didn't 
miss a shot, scoring 1 1 of his 

Set BASKETBALL Paget 



Page 5 



1-MINUTE 
DRILL 

Staff Reports 




BKW | K-State wins 1, drops 1 over 
weekend at Lady Rebel Shootout 

Umbefff Dittz poured in IS points, and 
Claire Coggrns added 15 as K-State cruised to a 
75-34 win over FJon in the consolation gam* 
of the Lady Rebel Shootout in Las Vegas on 
Saturday afternoon. 

Ashley Sweat and Shana Wheeler 
chipped It 10 points each, and Marties GJpson 
grabbed a game-high 11 rebounds for K-State 
(4-1), which led 36-20 at harfttme before 
holding Ekm to just 14 points in the second 
hid 

The Wildcats held an S-7 lead just under 
so; minutes into the game when Oku and 
Coggins ignited a 12-0 run to give the Wildcats 
all-point edge. 

Bon (2-3), which got seven points from 
Sashonru Moore and Amber Wall briefly 
steed K States advantage back to single digits 
with four minutes to go in the half, but the 
Wildcats scored eight of the final 10 points of 
the period to push their advantage to 16 at 
the break. 

K- States hot play continued in the second 
half. The Wildcats used a 1 3-4 run over the first 
si* minutes to take a 25 point lead, and the 
rout was on. 

The Wildcats' largest margin of the game 
was Its final one as Coggins hit a free throw 
with 22 seconds to play to put the finishing 
touches on the 41 -point win. 

On Friday, Dietz had 14 points and Gipson 
12 fur K-State, which opened the game on an 
1 1-2 run but was plagued by sloppy execution 
in its 56-53 loss to Wisconsin. 

The Wildcats committed 27 turnovers 
against only six assists. Fifteen came In the 
first half, as K-State shot 47 percent from the 
field but trailed 30-27 at the break. 

The Wildcats pulled ahead briefly in the 
second half before Wisconsin built a four-point 
lead with 20 seconds to go. 

Coggins knocked down a 3 pointer to cut 
the lead to one, but Wisconsin's Rae Lin Dalie 
hit two free throws to make it 56-53 with 
three seconds left. 



ONLINE 



The BCS mess 

With the exclusive 
nature of college foot 
ball several teams have 
no chance to make the 
championship game 
before the season 
even begins. Read 
columnist Jonathan 
Garten's article at 
htatKofltgkm.com. 




JONATHAN 

GARTEN 



Associated Press 

FBC | Trojans move up to No. 2; 
Michigan drops a spot in AP poll 

Southern California is the new No. 2. 

The Trojans advanced one spot to 
overtake Michigan in The Associated Press Top 
25 on Sunday, a day after their 44-24 victory 
over Notre Dame. USC, the sixth team to be 
ranked No. 2 this season behind No. 1 0hio 
State, leads the Wolverines by 36 points in the 
poll. 

Michigan, which completed its season 
with a 42-39 loss to Ohio State on Nov 18, fell 
to No. 3. The Wolverines (1 1 -1 ) are 63 points 
ahead of No. 4 Florida, which beat Florida 
State 21-14 to Improve to 11-1. 

Ohio State (12 0) was a unanimous No 
1 tor the second consecutive week and third 
time thb" </tit The Buckeyes received 65 first- 
place votes from the media panel 

While the Buckeyes have been top- 
ranked since the preseason, No. 2 has changed 
frequently Notre Dame, Texas, Auburn and 
Florida also have held the second spot 
Michigan's six-week run was the longest of 
any team this season. 

Michigan had a nine-point lead on USC 
in last week's poll, but the Trojans changed the 
minds of numerous voters on Saturday night 



I.Ohio State 
2. Southern 
California 

3. Michigan 

4. Florida 

5. ISO 

6. Louisville 

7. Wisconsin 
8 Arkansas 



10. Bobe State 

11. Auburn 

11 Notre Oame 



U. 

14. Virginia Tech 

15, West Virginia 

16. Wake Forest 

17, Tennessee 
17. Texas 

». Nebraska 
20.8YU 
21CaWomu 
UTeusAM 

23. Georgia Teds. 

24. Hawaii 

25. Boston College 



< 



ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT | SEX | FOOD | YOUR LIFE 

THE EDGE 



Page 6 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



A passion for dance 




Photo* by SWVM Doll | COLLEGIAN 
Shamokla Kirklin, freshman in pre-usychology, performs a dance routine as part of the Classy Cats' halfti me performance Nov. 1 1 during the men's basketball game against 
William & Mary at Bramlage Coliseum. 

lst-year Classy Cat brings global experience, life-long learning to team 



By Sheila Eliii 
KANSAS S?«l COLLEGIAN 

The spotlight was on her - a 
young girl in a pink tutu and se- 
quins sparkling just as bright as 
her smile. She wasn't scared then She 
isn't scared now 

The same fearless woman can be 
spotted wearing her purple sequins 
and shaking it with the Classy Cats. 

Shamckia Kirklin, freshman in pre- 
psychology from Copperstone, Texas, 
and a member of the Classy Cats, said 
she loves the crowd. 

Amanda Young, a fourth -year 
Classy Cat, said Kirklin brings a lot of 
spirit to the team 




Kirklin, who received a Certified Nursing 
Assistant degree while in high school, uses 
her spare time to choreograph solos for 
high school teams. 



"Shamckia is the only girl on the 
team that has the same amount of en- 
ergy at the beginning of the game and 
at the end." Young said. 

Kirklin said she never tries to out- 
dance or outshine any of the other 
Classy Cats. 

"I just dance. I love performing in 
front of people," she said. 

Although Kirklin grew up in a 
military family and has moved around 
since she was born, she found one 
thing she could do well everywhere 
she went: dance 

She said her love for dance started 
at age 2. 

For five years, she lived in Germa- 
ny, where she learned different styles 
of dance. 

"Their dance is definitely different 
from dance here in the U.S., because 
they have their own culture, and they 
show it in their dance," she said. 

While in high school, Kirklin per- 
formed in many places across the 
United States. She has danced with fa- 
mous choreographers like Wade Rob- 
son from the reality TV show "So You 
Think You Can Dance," and choreog- 
raphers for top music artists like Usher, 
Britney Spears and Beyonce. 

She has studied under many dance 
teachers, but one, Denise Wall, has had 
a particularly large influence, Kirklin 
said. 

Wall has produced many national 
dance success stories straight from her 
studio in Virginia Beach, Va, 

"She helped me realize my passion 
for dance and how I wanted to con- 
tinue dance throughout college," she 
said 

Kirklin said Wall was strict and lov- 
ing at the same time. 

"When it came to dance, that was 



her passion, (and it) made her job 
worthwhile She wanted everyone to 
dance the same and look the same," 
she said 

Kirklin said Wall was a positive role 
model and a second mom. 

When it was time for Kirklin to de- 
cide what to do after high school, at- 
tending K-State was high on the list 

"It was very ironic that she (Kirk- 
lin) was out there rooting for K-State 
to beat her hometown team of Texas at 
the last home game," Kathleen Henao, 
Classy Cat coordinator, said. 

Auditioning for the Classy Cats 
seemed like the next logical step in col- 
legiate life Tor Kirklin after she chose to 
attend K-State. 

After the two rounds of team try- 
outs, coordinators announced the se- 
lected women's numbers. 

"When they called my number, 1 
was so excited and ready to be a Gassy 
Cat," Kirklin said. 

Henao said women who audition 
for the team must attend a clinic, learn 
Classy Cat dance style and pay $500 to 
$700 in uniform, camp and other fees. 

"This clinic usually weeds out some 
of the girls that are not so serious," 
Henao said 

Henao said the women have an 
hour to team two combination dances 
of about 45 seconds each. Then they 
are asked to perform the dances for 
judges. Cuts are made, and auditioners 
start a second round of more intense 
techniques. 

Kirklin is the only black woman on 
the Classy Cat dance team 

Coming from predominantly white 
schools, Kirklin learned how to adapt 
and not view at herself as an outsider 
because she looked different 

"I don't look at dance as a race. It's 



just performing," she said. "We all love 
dance" 

Henao said Kirklin is talented and 
is a great asset to the team. 

"Shamckia is a person who wants 
to be remembered for who she is and 
not what (race) she is," Henao said. 

This part of Kirkiin's personal- 
ity came from her family, Kirklin said 
Relatives taught her not to look at race 
but look at individuals and their ac- 
complishments. 

"I am so close to my family. They 
have had so much to do with the per- 
son I am today," she said. 

In her spare time, she choreographs 
solos for high school dance teams. 

Another passion Kirklin has is help- 
ing people. She said she values assist- 
ing and supporting her close friends. 

While in high school, Kirklin earned 
her Certified Nursing Assistant degree. 

"I want to be a nurse so that 1 can 
help people," she said 

If it came between a professional 
dance career and being a registered 
nurse, Kirklin said she would try to do 
both because she is passionate about 
both. 

In Kirkiin's transition into college, 
she has faced some obstacles, includ- 
ing moving out of the residence halls 
mid-semester to have freedom to study 
and time to herself. 

And when it comes to being a part 
of the Classy Cats, Kirklin said the 
team is close and helps fulfill her col- 
lege experience 

Henao said the women participate 
in team bonding activities often 

Young said the Classy Cats are like 
a family 

"We have team unity in more than 
just dance and appearance. We arc 
unified in our daily lives," Young said. 



Monday, Nov. 27, 2006 

Contest 
opens AIDS 
to dialogue 



By Eric Brown 

KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Young Americans between the 
ages of 13 and 24 are contracting 
HIV at a rate of two people per 
hour, according to the White House 
Office of National AIDS Policy. 

To fight this trend, the HEAR ME 
Project embarks on its third-annual 
HIV/AIDS Story-Writing Contest 

HEAR ME encourages students 
ages of W to 22 to discuss the topic 
in an informal and creative setting, 
according to the project Web she. 
The mission of the contest is to 
empower youth to make informed, 
healthy choices. 

HEAR ME partners with celeb- 
rities to accomplish this goal. This 
year's entrees will be judged by a 
celebrity panel that includes HEAR 
ME honorary chair Morgan Free- 
man, Spike Lee and Hilary Duff. 

According to a press release from 
HEAR ME, the winner of the con- 
test will receive $2,500 The two 
winners of the previous contests also 
were made into educational films. 

Last year, the number of entries 
more than doubled, with stories 
coining from 40 countries. 

lssac Madison, director of the 
Regional AIDS Project in Manhat- 
tan, said educating people about the 
prevention of HIV and AIDS is the 
best defense against these diseases. 

"With there being no cure to 
these diseases, all we can do is learn 
more and teach others on how to 
avoid them," Madison said. "Anyone 
who is willing to use their talents or 
skills to educate others about HIV 
and AIDS is saving lives." 

Entries are to be no more than 
five pages and must be postmarked 
by Dec. 1. For more details, visit the 
HEAR ME contest Web site at www. 
hearmeproiect.org. 



TV's'Bachelor' 
to seek women 
for 10th season 



Staff reports 

KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

Today, women looking for a little love in 
Manhattan just might find in within an hour's 
drive. 

ABC affiliate KTKA in Topeka has an- 
nounced an open casting call for female con- 
testants on the reality TV series "The Bachelor' 

The casting call will take place tonight at 
Pigskins Sports Bar In Topeka. 

The casting call is 6-8 p.m. Those inter- 
ested either can pick up an application at the 
49 ABC studios or download one from Its Web 
site, www. 4 9abcntm.com. 

ABC producers said they are seeking ambi- 
tious, charming and successful bachelorettes 
who are ready to find true love. 

Bachelorettes selected will be featured 
in the show's 10th season of the popular TV 
series, which introduces one bachelor to 25 
eligible women. He then eliminates women 
from the group until one woman remains 
— with the choice lo establish a relationship 
beyond me camera crew. 

KTKA News contributed to this report 



S«*r* your story about yow audition at 
-The Bachelor'- uitmg cad by nwa^rfoe, 



TH I J W EEKa.a A look at events that occurred during this week in history, other bizarre holidays, happenings 



TODAY 



1965: Pentagon calls for 
more troops in Vietnam 



TtwMttpon 



Johnson that if Gen 
trilvVtrtmoreilAdlt 
to conduct ththugt 
iwftp oparWWH 
n««»rytod>itroy 
tntmy foruH during 
thi coming yt#r, 
u.J troop Mrtngth 

thOuWbitrKflltOd* 

from 1 20,000 to 
400,000 nm 



TUESDAY 





1520: Magellan reaches the Pacific Ocean 

After sailing through the dangerous straits below South America that 

now bear his name, Portuguese navigator Ferdinand Magellan enters 

the Pacific Ocean with three ships, becoming the first European 

explorer to reach the Pacific from the Atlantic Ocean On Sept 

, . 20,151 9, Magellan set sail from Spain in an effort to find a 

western sea route to the nch Soke Islands of Indonesia and 

soon discovered other lands. 



WEDNESDAY 



1986: Actor Cary Grant dies 



Actor Cary Grant dies of a stroke at the age of 82 . In 
a film career spanning more than 30 years, Grant distin- 
guished himself as a sophisticated and debonair leading 
man. Grant was bom Archibald Leach to a poor family in 
England in 1904 He left home at age 1 \ singing, dancing 
and sometimes juggling with an acrobatic troupe. 




THURSDAY 



1989: 1st female 
serial killer strikes 



Richard Wallorv, a storeowner in Palm Harbor, Fla., is 
last seen taking a ttd* with Aileen Wuornos. The following 
day, his car — containing his wallet some condoms and 
an empty vodka bottle — was found abandoned in a 
remote area of Ormond Beach. Hearty (wo weeks, later, his 
body turned up In a Daytona Beach junkyard with three 
bullets In his chest 

Mallory's murder was the first of seven committed 
by Wuornos over the next rear. Perhaps because she was 
one of the few female killers to gain widespread fame and 
notoriety, she was dubbed 'America's first female serial 
killer." Her case was heavily publicized through television 
talk snow appearances and a documentary, "The Selling 
of a Serial Kilter' Her story, filled with abuse and neglect, 
also was Illustrated in the movie 'Monster,' starring CharlUe 
Theron and Christina Rkcl. 



FRIDAY 



World AIDS 
Awareness Day 



AIDS is the most 
severe manifestation 
of Infection with 
Human Immunodefi 
clewy Virus (HIV), the 
virus that causes AIDS. As 
of January, World Health 
Organisation estimated 
AIDS has killed more than 
25 million people since 
il was first recognized 
on June 5, 1961, making 
It one of the most destructive epidemics in 
recorded history. 

Saww: MflttrOwwat Photo* «wttq«t 




<, 



>. 



t 



Monday, Nov. 27, 2006 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 7 



MALL | Children give Christmas lists to Santa Claus 

Continued from Page 1 were celebrating the beginning "For example, we have holidaj 



Webb said what he wants 
most for Christmas is a motor- 
cross bike 

Bethannie and Alexander 
Yamell, ages 5 and 3, respec- 
tively, made the evening a fam- 
ily affair and sat with Santa to- 
gether 

"Santa is really cool," Beth- 
annie said. "I told him ] want- 
ed a Little Mermaid bedroom 
set and a pony castle" 

Alexander said he asked for 
the "Cars" video game and said 
he loved the reindeer antler hat 
Santa gave him. 

"We'll leave him cookies 
and milk so he brings us pres- 
ents" he said. 

As the children were visiting 
Santa, many stores in the mall 



were celebrating the beginning 
of the holiday season. 

While many stores said they 
could not comment on what 
they have done to prepare for 
the holidays, a few mentioned 
some of the best-selling items 
they have had so far 

Sarah Gronburg, sates asso- 
ciate at Victoria's Secret, said 
it had one-day-only specials 
on the busy shopping day after 
Thanksgiving. 

"With any $50 purchase, 
customers received a free 
Victoria's Secret tote bag," she 
said. 

Gronburg said she thinks 
this holiday season has been 
just as busy as last year's so Far 

"We're selling a lot of the 
things that we have available 
only for the holidays," she said. 



For example, we have holiday 
pajamas, robes, fragrances and 
our Pink sweatpants" 

Vanity started its season 
with an interesting twist, be- 
cause the day after Thanksgiv- 
ing was the store's first day of 
business 

"It was ail of the employees' 
first day of work, so everyone 
was kind of nervous," (Cactus 
Kelly, Vanity sales associate, 
said 

She said the store was busy, 
and Saturday's business was 
steady, too. 

"We've sold a lot of our 
Vanity jeans," Kelly said. "A lot 
of people stop by to shop for 
other people, like grandmoth- 
ers looking for clothes for their 
granddaughters. It's a lot of fun 
to help them look." 



DRAFT | Legislation to be put forward in Congress 
by N.Y. representative; students express opposition 



Continued from Page 1 

for some other option." 

Polls by both Gallup and 
USA Tbday show seven out of 
10 Americans oppose the rein- 
statement of the draft. 

"One of the great things 
about America is our freedom, 
and mandating military service 
is taking away part of that free- 



dom,*' said Jared Hupp, fresh- 
man in pre- professional sec- 
ondary education. 

Legislation regarding the 
draft will face a difficult trek 
to becoming law. First it must 
pass through both the House of 
Representatives and the Senate, 
but it also must bypass a presi- 
dential veto. The only way for 
Congress to override this veto 



is by a two-thirds vote in both 
chambers 

"1 think (Range!) realized 
that this will never pass," said 
Casey Walker, sophomore in 
hotel and restaurant manage- 
ment. "In my opinion, he is just 
putting this out there to point 
out the fact that if we had a 
draft, we wouldn't be in a point- 
less war." 




Christopher Hanewinckel I COLLEGIAN; 

Sal* ihoppars packed Manhattan Town Cantar for Black Friday after Thanksgiving. Many stores offered 
discounts for the large crowds that flocked to the mall. 



© Bltd ® Lifetime 

engagements and weddings 

You didn't know they were dating? 

Once in a Lifetime, in the Collegian the first Friday of the month. 



To announce your mil*iton#. vhii Kedll* 10} In advertise, till S3! 6S60 

KllfporStory WmP 

Call 532-6556 or e-mail: U collegian @>spub.ksu.«du # flB 



CLASSIFIEDS 



To place an advertisement call 



II — • | i I I l l -|| || mi II 

I 1 !! ■■ ' L 1 :: L 1 «J ss 'li. ■" ! 

LET'S RENT 



IJ 

Help Wanted 



V 

Help Wonted 





TWO-BEDROOM/ ONE 
bath townhouse $650.00, 
new construction Also 
two-bedroom/ two bath 
apartment near the malt, 
call Wildcat Property at 
785-537-2332 



ROOMMATE WANTED 
Three-bedroom house. 
$350, utilities included 
Washer/ dryer, tented 
yard, lull kitchen, oft street 
parking, close to campus 
785-313-4730 



SUBLEASERS NEEDED 
tor throe bedroom apart- 
ment. On* and one- halt 
bath. $240/ room dose to 
campus and Aggieville 
Available January Con- 
tact 795-537-7810, 
316-214-4745 



LEARN TO FLVI K-Slale 
Flying Club has five air- 
planes and lowest rales 
Call 785-770-1744, www- 
ksu edu/katc 





Lost and found ads can 
be placed tree for three 
days. 

FOUND: FEMALE'S left 
shoes at KSU vs. Texas 
game at north goalpost 
While with pmk NIKE 
swish. size 8 1/2. 
785-410-3356 




ONE-BEDROOM, walk to 
class. No drinking. Smok- 
ing, or pets. 785*539-1554 

THREE- SEVEN-BED- 
ROOM houses near cam- 
pus lor next year June/ 
August leases all have 
central air, full kitchens, 
and washer/ dryer Call 
now for best selection 
785-341-1897. 

TWO-BEDROOM 
HOUSE Available Jan- 
uary I, 2O07 Close to 
campus. No pets Call 
785-539-1975 or 

785-313-4485, 



Housing ' Real Estate 




Rent-Apt Furnished 



15X60 THREE-BED- 

ROOM, two bath Very 
nice Please call, 

785-494-2883. leave mes- 
sage Must sell! 




Manhattan CITY Ordi- 
nance 4614 assures ev- 
ery person equal opportu- 
n rty In hou 1 1 ng without dl a • 
Unction on account of 
race, tai. familial status, 
military statu a, disability, 
religion, age, color, na- 
tional origin or ancestry 
Violations should be re- 
ported lo the Director of 
Human Resource* at City 
Hall, (785)567-2440. 



Roommate Wanted 




MANHATTAN CTTY Ordl- 
nsne* 4614 assure* ev- 
ery person equal opporlu 
nrty In hou a I ng without dle- 
tlnctlon on account of 
nee. t*i, famUtal status. 
military stilus, disability, 
religion, eg*, color, na- 
tional origin or ancastry. 
violation* should be re- 
ported lo 1h* Director of 
Human Heeource* at City 
Han. (785)587-2440. 

ONE-BEDROOM. 
CLOSE to campus in 
newer ownptM. No P*t* 
785-313-7473. 



FEMALE ROOMMATE 
needed for tour-bedroom 
house, $350/ month plus 
electrtcfry, gas, SBC 
Quiet, nice house, major 
appliances Included. 
785-587-9207. 
785-23 0-3008. 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted lo share 3 bed- 
room apartment near cam- 
pus $250 per month plus 
1/3 utility Available Jan- 
uary 1st. 785-537-1746 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted who loves pets 
and Is neat, quiet, and re- 
sponsible Rant $310/ 
month Including utilities 
Private bath. First month 
free with January atari 
Call 785-537-8807 lor de- 
tails. 

FfcMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted Share three-bed- 
room private home. Seri- 
ous students only. $325 
plus one-third utilities. Pre- 
fer (ease through summer 
78S-53B-5762, 



FEMALE SU8LEASER 
needed for two-bedroom, 
two bath apartment 
Brand new Washer/ 
dryer. Walking distance to 
campus 785-545-5106 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 
needed immediately 

Close to campus, ott- 
slreet parking S4O0 a 
month utilities included 
913-961-0673 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 
needed lor two-bedroom 
two bath apartment Con- 
tact Coiista at 
766-543-4258 Available 
January 1 

FEMALE SU8LEASER 
needed lor January- July 
four- bedroom house 
$300 per month plus one- 
fourth utilities Washer/ 
dryer, dishwasher in- 
cluded. 620-271 2956 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 
needed. spring 2007 
semester $330/ month 
Available January - May 
Nice, newer, three-bed- 
room house, built 1997 
785-221-2282 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 
wanted to share tour -bed- 
room/ two bath apartment 
First month free, $315/ 
month Available now 
through Jury 2007 
907-232-4601 

MALE SUBLEASER 

needed Spring 2007, 
close to campus. $300 
per month plus one-halt 
utilities Please call Bran- 
don Bayless 
785-230-0512 

MALE SUBLEASER 

wanted. Close lo campus, 
washer and dryer, tour- 
bedroom, rent $370 
Needed by January 
785-282-0899 



Em ployment/Careers 




SUBLEASER NEEDED 
tor Spring 2007 semester 
$315 per month Four-bed- 
room apartment. January 
rent paid 785-416-1778 
I 

i 



THE COLLEGIAN cannot 
verify the financial poten- 
tial of advertisements In 
the Employment/Career 
classification Reader* 
are advised to approach 
any such business op po r ■ 
tunrty with rea- 

sonable cau- 

tion. The Collegian urge* 
our reader* lo contact lit* 
Better Business Bureau, 
$01 SE J*tfef*on. 
Topefca, KS 66607-1190 
(786)232- 04S4. 

4 OLIVE S Wine Bar now 
hiring lunch cooks. Flexi- 
ble hours, competitive 
pay Apply n person 3033 
Anderson Avenue 

BARTENDING ' $300 a 
day potential. No experi- 
ence necessary Training 
provided. Call 

1-800 965-6520 em 144 

CLEANING CREW - Flexi- 
ble Night Hours- Farm Bu- 
reau Is seeking a Building 
Services Attendant to per- 
lorm routine night mainte- 
nance and general clean- 
ing in and around our 
building and grounds 
Hours are flexible (part - 
time, 4 hour shifts or lull - 
time. 8 hour shifts.) AH 
shifts occurring between 
10:30pm and 7:00am Sun- 
day through Thursday 
Benefits provided for full- 
time candidates High 
school diploma, or equiva- 
lent, extensive physical ef- 
fort required. To apply 
and view our other oppor- 
tunities, please email your 
resume to bill.plnegartffbl- 
linancial com 

COOK NEEDED ai Westy 
Community Care Home 
Competitive wage, flexible 
scheduling Contact 

Nancy. Highway 99 and 
Main 
786-457.2801 



CREATIVE DIRECTOR 
Civic Plus is the nations 
leading provider of City, 
County, and School web- 
sites. This Is a full-time. 
Manhattan based posi- 
tion Vou will be In charge 
ot directing the creative 
process, including brain- 
storming with stall, meet- 
ing with customers and 
providing the creative vi- 
sion necessary to give our 
customers outstanding 
and award winning web- 
sites Salary commensu- 
rate with experience Ben 
efila include health, den- 
tal, paid holidays, paid va- 
cation and 40 IK match- 
ing. Email resume in Mi- 
crosoft Word or teid tor- 
mat to jobs@civicplus 
com, Include cover letter 
explaining your capabili- 
ties. 

EARN $2500* monthly 
and more to type simple 
ads online www dataen- 
irytyperscom 

EARN $800 - $3200 a 
month to drive brand new 
cars with ads placed on 
them www AdDhve Team - 
com. 

GRAPHIC DESIGNER 
ClvicPlua is the nations 
leading provider of city, 
county and school web- 
sites Both full-time and 
work -at-home (contract) 
positions are available 
Full-time benalils include 
health, dental, paid holi- 
days, paid vacation and 
401(k) matching Email 
resume and design sam- 
ples lo jobs® civlcplus com 

HARRYS DAYTIME 

DISHWASHER NEEDED. 
Shifts 10am - 3pm on 
Mon-Wed-Frl and/ or 
Tuas-Thurs. Some night 
and/ or weekend availabil- 
ity Apply in person at 418 
Poynti Ave. Good Pay 

HELP NEEDED concrete 
mixer drivers full or part- 
time must have CDL lis- 
tens* call or stop by Val- 
ley Concrete Operations. 
22620 Highway 24 in 
Belvue Kansas 

785-456-6499 Free em- 
ployment drug screening. 
Great for students looking 
for part-time work. 

HELP WANTED KSU 
Beef Cattle Research Cen- 
ter Contact Malt Qulnn 
at 785-539-4971 or 
miq@ksu.edu 

LOOKING FOR someone 
to do clerical' typing work 
$300 per week Email: we- 
bvislon 33® yahoo com 

MYSTERY SHOPPERS. 
Earn up to $150. Expen- 
ence not required Under- 
cover shoppers needed to 
ludge retail and tuning es- 
tablishments Call 
600-722-4791. 

PROGRAMMER CIVIC- 
PLUS Is the nations lead- 
ing provider of city, county 
and school websites Full 
- time position in Manhat- 
tan. Microsoft ASP or 
SQL experience required 
$14.50/ hour plus health, 
dental, paid holidays, paid 
vacation and 401 (k) 
matching. Email resume 
in Microsoft Word or text 
format to (obaCohncpkis.- 
eom 



RANDALL'S FORMAL 
Wear is looking for a part- 
time sales person with out- 
standing customer service 
skills Flexible hour* great 
starting wage and commis- 
sion program II you 
would like to join our team 
stop by and fill out an ap- 
plication at 100 Manhat- 
tan Town Cenler Mall 
785-770-901 1 

SALES CIVICPLUS is the 
nations leading provider 
ot crty, county and school 
websites This full-time po- 
sition in Manhattan has 
significant income poten- 
llal for the nghl individual 
$24,000 base plus aggres- 
sive commission sched- 
ule. Benefits Include 
health, dental, pakt holi- 
days, paid vacation and 
401 (k) matching Email 
resume In Microsoft Word 
or text format to jobs®- 
civlcplus.com. 

1RAINER CIVICPLUS is 
the nations leading 
provider ot city, county 
and school websites. 
This full-time position in- 
volves training end-users 
at both our Manhattan of- 
fice as wall as al our client 
sites across the US. Posi- 
tion requires the ability lo 
apeak in front ot small 
groups and a good under- 
standing ot MS Word 
Benefits include health, 
dental, paid holidays, paid 
vacation and 40t(k) 
matching Email resume 
In Microsoft Word or text 
tormat lo joba@clvicplue.- 
com 

WEB DESIGNER. Award 
winning advertising 

agency. Imagemakers, 
seeks lull -time web devel- 
oper/ web designer. Some 
training provided Apply at 
www wamegowork com 





Transportation 




1990 CHEVY Blazer 
LOTS ol recenl work, runs 
great I $2000 or Best Offer. 
785-226-1620. 




ft SPRING Break Web 
alt* * Low Prices Guaran- 
teed. Group discounts for 
6t Book 20 people, gat 3 
tree trips! www Spring- 
Breakdlscounts.com or 
900-638 8202 




y^1K A N S A S STA1I 

COLLHGIAN 

103 K«dzie< 785)532-6560 



suldolku 



Fill in the grid so that every row, 

every column, and every 3x3 box 

contains the digits 1 through 9 

with no repeats. 



1 2 



1 

8 

6 7 



5 
9 2 
4 



4 1 



8 

6 9 

5 



1 3 



6 



2 3 

4 
9 



3 2 



8 



Solution and tips 
at www.sudoku.com 



$ 2 0FF 

any regular or large sub 




Deadlines 



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placed by noon tnt day 
before you want your *d 
rp run Ctautfied display 

adi muii be placed by 

4p.m. two working day* 

prior to the date you 

wrnt your ad to run. 

CAU 785 532 6555 



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Uses 

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p JMd in advance unt«n 
you new* am account 

wlih Uudent 
Publications Inc.. Cnh, 
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Tii«i <ii a $H Hfrvlca) 

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Pages 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, Nov. 27, 2006 



Vendors employ hobbies 
to create crafts for show 



By Krlitln Modgts 

KANSAS STATE COUEGIAN 

A maze of vendors selling 
everything from stained glass 
to rocking horses filled Pot- 
troff Hall in CiCo Park Sat- 
urday for the Homemade for 
the Holidays craft show 

Some vendors chatted with 
the numerous customers who 
browsed the crowded aisles, 
while others still crafted and 
waited to sell their goods 

Lisa Volland, Topeka resi- 
dent, said she paid a fee when 
the registered for the event in 
order to sell her homemade 
wreaths. 

"It's usually a pretty good 
show," she said. "People come 
to spend money 

Volland said she sells the 



wreaths during the fall, and 
the profit she makes from 
each craft show depends on 
what other events are hap- 
pening in the area. 

She said she began her 
hobby with making bows be- 
cause she was bored, and that 
eventually developed into 
making wreaths and decorat- 
ing antique items. 

"I always have to be craft- 
ing," Volland said. 

Volland is a school teacher 
and makes crafts during the 
summer and sometimes be- 
tween grading papers, she 
said. 

"Some people in here have 
been crafting for years and 
years," Volland said, "t want 
to be one of those people." 

Jessie Redding, St. George, 



Kan., resident, was visit- 
ing the craft show with her 
grandmother like she does 
every holiday season, she 
said. 

Redding said she usually 
attends the Homemade for 
the Holidays craft show to 
look for Christmas gifts. 

"I'm just looking around," 
she said. "I'm looking for 
jewelry - for myself and my 
family members ■ 

Mary Clayes, St George, 
Kan., resident, sold crocheted 
hats and potholders for the 
first time at the craft show, 
although she has attended 
other craft shows in the past 

"1 don't do it for com- 
mercial reasons," she said. 
It's just a hobby and a stress 
buster." 



to spend money to oe one oi inose people. us |ust a nonoy ana a sires 

Volland said she sells the Jessie Redding, St. George, buster" 

Vanity opens 4th store in Kansas; 
chain targets 17- to 22-year-olds 

:hd«v» "We have a lot, ranging this store just opened I ex 



By i«s a Sachdava 

KANSAS STATE C0UE6IAN 

Opening its doors on the 
busiest shopping day of the 
year, national retail clothing 
chain Vanity started its fourth 
Kansas store in Manhattan 
Town Center Nov. 24. 

With existing shops in Sa- 
lina; Hays. Kan ; and Topeka, 
the store aims to bring its 
clothing to the college-town 
atmosphere of Manhattan. 

Shay Hastings, manager 
of Vanity, previously worked 
at Vanity stores in Hays and 
Oklahoma. 

"We target that 17-22 age 
group, but we also carry things 
for women of all ages, with a 
variety of styles and extended 
sizes," Hastings said 



"We have a lot, ranging 
from club clothes to lounge- 
wear, so you have something, 
and then something for the 
morning after" 

Despite opening for busi- 
ness the day after Thanksgiv- 
ing, the busy shopping day 
known as "Black Friday," 
Hastings said she thought her 
staff kept it together. 

"It was a blast There were 
a lot of people, but it wasn't 
anything we couldn't handle," 
she said 

Lauren Davis, sophomore 
in open option, said she has 
shopped at Vanity in Topeka 
and thought the Manhat- 
tan location wasn't as fully 
stocked 

"The Topeka store had a 
few more options, but since 



this store just opened I ex- 
pect it will get better," Davis 
said. 

Whitney Madsen and 
Paige Hoyt, sophomores at 
Manhattan High School, said 
they frequent Wet Seal, a 
store in the mall that caters 
to the same clientele. Wet 
Seal opened earlier this fall. 

"In comparison to Wet 
Seal, the store layout is a lot 
smaller, but they are still able 
to fit in just as many clothes" 
Hoyt said 

Madsen said she agreed. 

"The fashions at Vanity 
were similar to Wet Seal. I 
thought Vanity was a little 
less expensive, too," Madsen 
said. "The staff were pretty 
friendly - I think the store 
(is) off to a good start." 



MAYO | Player craves spotlight to boost NBA dreams 

Continued from Page 5 



Reggie Bush and Matt Leinart, 
the school is ready for a player 
of my caliber" 

Of course. Walker and Bea- 
sley didn't come to K-State to 
join the chess club. They want 
to play in the NBA, and they 
see Huggins as their ticket 

Bui they don't seem to 
crave the national spotlight 



like Mayo does. They can be 
happy playing for Huggins in 
the relative obscurity of Man- 
hattan. 

It's doubtful Mayo ever 
could. 

Besides, it would be hard 
to find enough shots to keep 
Mayo, Walker and Beasley 
happy Mayo wants to be 
biggest show in town, and he 
might get his wish at USC. 



The bottom line is this: 
Manhattan and Mayo simply 
do not fit. 

As my old friend Johnnie 
Cochran always said, "If it 
don't fit, you must not com- 
mit" 



Austin Meek Ha senior in pubikreU 
(torn. PImm lend csmmen b Id ipwln 
spuo.Jkw/.«h/. 



BASKETBALL | Martin reaches 1,000 career points 



Continued from Page 5 

13 points in the final minutes. 
Martin hit three 5 pointers and 
two free throws to help K-State 
outscore Coppin State 22-12 
with 7:50 left in the game. 

"1 knew I could make shots," 
Martin said. "I talked to coach 
Huggins, and he helped me out 
with the little things I was do- 
ing wrong. He helped me get 



my shot back to where it once 
was" 

Martin sunk his first 3- point- 
er with less than seven minutes 
to play. The basket gave Mar- 
tin 1,000 points for his career 
and made him the 19th K State 
player to reach that mark. 

Although it was Martin who 
sparked the Wildcats late in the 
game, K Statu relied on senior 
guard Lance Harris in the first 



half. Harris scored 13 of the 
Wildcats' 30 first half points 
and finished with a career-high 
26 points. 

Despite his own strong per- 
formance, Harris said he felt the 
team has a long way to go. 

"It's very frustrating be- 
cause we haven't played our 
best game yet,'' Harris said "We 
aren't playing at the level we 
have been striving for." 



World AIDS Day 

December 1st 

Events for the week. 

November 27 - 30: 

AIDS information table sponsored by 
SHAPE and Lafene Health Center 
•What's Your Sign?" t-shirts for $10 
K-State Union, 1 1 :00 am - 1 :00 pm 
Nov. 27 - Courtyard 
Nov. 28, 29 & 30 - Food Court 

December 1: 

• AIDS Walk - Bosco Piaza at 4:45 pm. 
Ends at Varney's. No fee. Hot chocolate and cookies provided 
(Thanks to Varney's, Bluestem Bistro & Planet Sub.) 

- Quilt piece dedicated for the AIDS Memorial Quilt. 

December 2: 

- Art AID - Art auction in Union Ballroom, 6 - 9 pm 




L 
i 



Call Health Promotion, 765,532.6595, for more info or check the 
website: www. k-state edu/lafene/SHAPE/AI DSdayOS. htm 




Traveling Wildcats lets alumni 
globetrot to 25 places annually 



By Ucay O. Macktv 
IMMS STATf COUEGMN 

P 

Manhattan resident Dave 
Woolfolk is taking a trip with 
his family through Traveling 
Wildcats for the second time 
in July. 

Traveling Wildcats is 
an organization that of- 
fers group travel to K-State 
alumni and friends through 
the K Stale Alumni Associa- 
tion. 

Woolfolk, a 1962 K-State 
graduate, said he and his 
wife have traveled to Italy 
with the organization and 
will travel to Alaska this 
summer. 

"We liked being with a 
group of tourists, some with 
K-State or college back- 
ground," he said. 

Woolfolk said he and his 
wife also have been on a 
number of cruises, but they 
have enjoyed taking trips 
with Traveling Wildcats be- 
cause of the group's plan- 
ning and organization. 

"They do a great job," he 
said. 

Traveling Wildcats takes 
400-500 people to about 25 
destinations each year. 



J ana Wyatt, director 
of alumni travel, said the 
Alumni Association works 
with companies to take care 
of the trips, putting together 
excursions, meals and trans- 
portation. 

The trips are not associ- 
ated with athletic travel, 
Wyatt said 

These trips allow people 
to visit destinations around 
the globe with others asso- 
ciated with K-State Wyatt 
said the four most popular 
destinations have been Alas- 
ka, Russia, China and the 
Panama Canal. 

The travel companies 
Wyatt works through come 
in February each year and 
showcase the trips the 
groups are planning for the 
following year. Wyatt said 
the Alumni Association sur- 
veys alumni and then de- 
cides which trips it will put 
on the schedule. 

Wyatt said the travel 
companies also pay for all 
marketing for the trips, in- 
cluding sending out 10,000- 
17,000 brochures at no real 
cost to the Alumni Associa- 
tion 

The companies that work 



with the Alumni Association 
include Alumni Holidays In- 
ternational. Alumni Travel 
Group, Go Next and Intrav 

Wyatt said she w antes 
alumni to know group travel 
can be a fun way for people 
with similar interests to go 
to destinations together. 

"What 1 would like to 
do is dispel the notion that 
group travel is for the older 
generation and that it doesn't 
have choices," she said. 

Mary Jo Griffith, Man- 
hattan resident, said the 
program is a good way for 
people to travel with other 
college people, either from 
K-State or other universi- 
ties. 

Griffith, who is preparing 
to go to Vienna, Italy, next 
week with the program said 
she has been on six to eight 
trips over time, traveling 
with friends or on her own. 

Wyatt said the program 
allows people who have an 
association with K-State to 
continue their relationship 
with the university. 

"It just continues on that 
lifelong link to allow 
K Staters to travel together," 
she said. 



Memorial honors transgender victims 
of hate crimes with poems, stories 



By Megan Mom 
KANSAS STATE COtLEGIAN 

Dozens gathered at the 
Dusty Bookshelf Nov. 20 for 
a memorial honoring people 
in the transgender commu- 
nity who have been victims of 
hate crimes. 

The Kansas Equality Co- 
alition of the Hint Hills spon- 
sored the event as a part of 
the eighth-annual nationwide 
Transgender Day of Remem- 
brance, observed each year in 
November. 

"The Dusty Bookshelf was 
really filled up," said Alley 
Stoughton, event organizer 
and associate professor of 
computing and information 
science. "We used all of their 
chain and more." 

Stoughton said most of the 
people in attendance were K- 
State students, with a number 



of representatives from Ordi- 
nary Women and the Depart- 
ment of Women's Studies. 

Participants read a poem 
by S. Bear Bergman and 
first-person accounts of slain 
Iran sgende red people. 

"Perhaps 25 students 
bravely did this, and the at- 
mosphere was very emotion- 
al," Stoughton said. "Then we 
finished up with a period of 
(question and answer) and 
comments. 

"One community member 
talked about the transgender 
friend of hers who was raped 
years ago and has never really 
recovered from it." 

Although not every per- 
son honored on the Day of 
Remembrance self-identified 
as transgender, each was a 
victim of violence based on 
bias against transgender or 
gender-variant people. 



The event began in 1999 
in San Francisco to honor 
Rita Hester, whose alleged 
anti-transgender murder case 
remains unsolved, according 
to the K-State Web site, www. 
ds.ksu.edu/-stough/tdor. 
html. 

Stefani Schrader, president 
of Ordinary Women, said the 
group wanted to be involved 
with the event because it rais- 
es consciousness on campus 
about people of all genders. 

"It was startling to hear 
the wide array of ages these 
stories were about," said 
Schrader, senior in women's 
studies and English literature. 
"Also, there were a couple 
of local stories and some in- 
ternational ones. It's not just 
one certain group of people 
hate crimes affect. It was im- 
portant to share but at the 
same time really startling." 



■auffiji 



we've got the stories you've got to read. 



Purple y 

in K 




o0 V. in the Collegian 

To advertise in Menu Mania 
Call7«5-532-6560 



: 



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/^\K A N S A S STATE '""f 

Read why 



COLLEGIAN 



the women's 
volleyball team I 
poorly this year. 

Saa rtory Paga 5 




w w wkstal ecoliegiaa com 



Tuesday, November 28, 2006 



Vol.lll.No.68 



City of lights 




Photo* by SUvan Doll | (OLLF&IAN 
Monica Carlton, 16, plays the flute with the Manhattan High School marching band as they make their way down Poyntz Avenue Monday evening as part of the fifth- 
annual Mayor's Spirit of the Holiday Lighted Parade. The parade had about SO entries. 

5th-annual mayor's holiday parade features almost 50 lighted entries 



By Jesse Sachdava 
KANSAS STATE COiLEGIAN 

Marching bands. Girl Scouts, can- 
dy canes, elected officials, even gar- 
bage trucks and sailboats all marched 



down Poyntz Avenue last night. 

The festivities were part of the fifth- 
annual Mayor's Spirit of the Holiday 
Lighted Parade. 

Since it started in 2002, the then- 
small parade has grown into an ex- 




Spectators watch as parade participants pass by in front of Varney's Book 
Store. The parade started by Manhattan Town Center and ended after passing 
through Aggieville. 



travagant production featuring nearly 
50 participants. Proceeds from the 
parade benefit the Flint Hills Bread- 
basket and the Mayor's Holiday Food 
and Fund Drive 

Lisa Rockley, coordinator o;f pa 
rade entries for the City of Manhat- 
tan, said she spent several months 
planning the parade. 

"Involvement is up a lot this year," 
Rockley said. "We have several new 
participants that are bringing new 
things to the parade. The Blue Valley 
Yacht Club is one of them. They actu 
ally brought in a sailboat to use as a 
float." 

Among the more eccentric floats 
of the evening was the entry from Ex- 
press Personal Services, which was 
themed "Candy Cane Lane." 

"Our staff contributed a lot to the 
float" Lynn Hinrichsen, owner of 
Express, said. "We've been getting to- 
gether on Sunday nights the last few 
weeks to work on it" 

Craig Do an, junior in biochemistry, 
said he participated in the first Spirit 
of the Holiday parade as a member of 



the Manhattan High School March- 
ing Band in 2002. 

"It's substantially better this year," 
Doan said. "That first year there were 
like IS floats. I'm impressed how 
much it's grown. 

Sharon Runyan, coordinator of 
youth ministry for Seven Dolors Cath- 
olic Church, worked with Manhattan 
Catholic Schools' sixth -grade class on 
its float. 

The class' float featured a Nativity 
scene, with members dressed as wise 
men and shepherds 

The Manhattan Catholic Schools' 
float won Most Creative Entry dur- 
ing the parade award ceremony in 
Aggieville. Express was awarded the 
Mayor's Trophy for the second con- 
secutive year. 

The evening ended with the cer- 
emonial lighting of the Mayor's Holi- 
day Tree in Aggieville's Triangle Park. 

"I'm glad to see all the community 
involvement with the parade," Alison 
Smith, Manhattan resident, said "It 
always gets me excited for this time of 
year" 



Senior wins 

Marshall 

Scholarship 

By Hannah Sandar* 

KANSAS SUU COLLEGIAN 



A K State student won a Marshall 
Scholarship this year. 

Lisa Kitten, senior in mechanical 
engineering, was selected to receive 
the scholarship after an intense appli- 
cation process. 

The process began in spring 2006 
and included a personal statement 
and a study proposal along with a 
30- minute panel interview After re- 
ceiving the signature of K State Presi- 
dent fon Wefald and the university's 
endorsement, Kitten proceeded on to 
the national competition. 

She was one of 25 selected from 
a group of about 200 to interview 
in Chicago at the British Consulate- 
General on Nov 8 to compete for the 
scholarship, according to a K-State 
Media Relations press release. 

Kitten said the process was differ- 
ent because the majority of the inter- 
view was not about her area" of study 

"They asked me about |ohn Paul 
II and immigration policy and British 
healthcare policy, along with things 
like the nuclear situation in Iran," 
she said. "They want you to have a 
good understanding of the world and 
be interested in strengthening the ties 
between Britain and the U.S." 

Kitten is a senior member of the 
Engineering Student Council and has 
served as president, director of pub- 
licity, director of development and 
freshman leadership committee presi 
dent. She chairs the Mechanical and 
Nuclear Engineering Student Adviso- 
ry Council, sits on the Coordinating 
Committee for People with Disabili- 
ties, and is a member of the Engineer- 
ing in Medicine and Biology Society. 
She serves as a mentor for new en- 
gineering students, is a member of 
Women Mentoring Women, and was 
an Engineering Ambassador. 

"Not one single activity set me 
apart for the scholarship It was the 
variety of activities and showing the 
panel that they weren't resume-build- 
ers but that I really do care about 
them," Kitten said 

Kitten will attend the University of 
Oxford in Oxford, England, to study 
biomedical engineering. 

"I will be doing work with pros- 
thesis research at Oxford because I 
feel that the field directly impacts the 
quality of someone's life," she said 

See MARSHALL Page7 



Financial aid office warns students against paying companies to file FAFSA 



By Austin Apple 

KANSAS STAT! COLLEGIAN 

The K-State Office of Student 
Financial Assistance is warning stu- 
dents about a company offering to 
file students' Free Application for 
Federal Student Aid for a fee. 

The office sent an e-mail to stu- 
dents Wednesday that said paying 
the company Student Financial Aid 
Services to complete the FAFSA is 
something students should never do. 

"Students should be aware that 
the application for federal financial 
aid is free," said Larry Moeder, assis- 
tant vice president of Student Finan- 
cial Assistance. 



INSIDE 



K State-Salina reaches 40 yean 

The Salina aviation and technology program 
celebrates its 40th anniversary by granting 
K- State degrees to students who went to the 
school before it merged with K-State- Salina. 
See story Pag* 1 



The first line on the Student Fi- 
nancial Aid Services Web site says 
it is not affiliated with the United 
States Department of Education or 
FAFSA, said Scott Alexander, com- 
pany vice president of sales and mar- 
keting. 

According to the company's Web 
site, students can have an applica- 
tion filed for as low as $49.99 for 
returning applicants and $79 99 for 
new applicants. 

Moeder said several students re- 
ported they received information 
about the service in an e-mail and 
asked K-State's office about the com- 
pany. 

"We told 



them not to reply," 



Moeder said, 

Alexander said the company has 
been in business for IS years and 
helps students and parents complete 
the FAFSA correctly. The services 
are similar to a tax return service 

"We have a professional financial 
adviser who looks over the FAFSA 
application in order to try and make 
it as perfect as possible before it gets 
filed," Alexander said. 

The company understands the 
FAFSA is an important financial 
document and takes its work seri- 
ously, Alexander said. 

"The idea of this being a scam is 
completely unfounded," he said. 

Grady Martin, junior in market 



Signs a scholarship is a scam: 

■ The scholarship Is guaranteed or your 
money bad." 

■ "You canl get this information anywhere 
else" 

■ "I just need your credit ard or bank 
account number to hold this scholarship.'' 

■ -We'll do all the work.* 

■ The Khotoship will cost some money." 

■ "You've been selected by a 'national foun 
datkm'to receive a scholarship' w "You're a 
ftnafet" m • contest you never entered, 
lui.u.iiiiuufeaw 

ing, said he thinks the idea of scam 
ming students was ridiculous. 
"People should work to get their 



money and not try and rip off the 
students who are trying to get an ed- 
ucation." Martin said "It's just one 
of those things that students have 
got to be informed about before they 
sit there and throw their money to 
something." 

The Federal Trade Commission's 
Web site has information for stu- 
dents and parents regarding the rec- 
ognition of scams and lists compa- 
nies that have been found guilty of 
scamming students, Moeder said. 

The FTC Web site has a list of six 
signs that a scholarship is a scam. 

K State's financial assistance of- 
fice also answers questions and of- 
fers free help in filing the FAFSA. 



.»..„.,. Today's forecast 
Uhl'}/ Partly cloudy /Windy 
High: 69 Low: 42 



CAMPUS NEWS HIGHLIGHTS 



Architecture in motion 

The Chang Gallery in Seaton Hall 
features the Italian Railway and 
Postal Building Architecture from 
1928-194) by Angiolo Mazzoni. It 
will be on display until Friday The 
gallery Is open from S a.m. to 5 
p.m. Michael McNamara, professor 
of architecture, organized the 
ethMkm. 



Sales competition 

teisha Harrison, senior in market- 
ing, received first place at an 
annual sales competition from 
the Brase Financial Group of north- 
western Mutual Financial Network 
She participated in role-playing 
scenarios with professionals. 
Andrew West, junior in marketing, 
placed second, and Kimberly Ernst 
senior In marketing, placed third. 



Kemper Art Gallery 

Today is the last day of Elizabeth 
lames' ceramics exhibit In the 
Kemper Art Gallery In the 
K-State Student Union. Photog- 
raphy horn Pete Souza, a farmer 
White House photographer, will 
be in the gallery Thursday, The 
gallery is open from 8 a.m. to 

Spurn 



New dollar coins 

In 2007, the U.S. Mint wi begin circulating a series of dollar coins that feature 
former U.S presidents In the order In which they served as president 




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Tuesday, Nov; 28, 2006 



&aftin jjoofo and Cppimi 



18T4 Cfaffin Rd 
wwwxtaflmbookscom 



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Fax: 



(TBS) 776-3771 
(785) 77$-1(M 



Puzzles | Eugene Sheffer 



ACROSS 

1 Clinton's 
successor 

5 Hotel 
employee 

9 English 
channel? 

12 Vicinity 

13 Con 

14 Meadow 

15 Supreme 
leader? 

ITCoBee 
vessel 

18 Potter's 
oven 

19 Repre- 
sentative 

21Sedaie 
and 
sell- 
restrained 

24 Gator's 
km 

25 Compe 
tent 

26 Filled with 
love 

30 Dr. 
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srtop 

31 Brings up 

32 Peculiar 

33 Went 
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35 Europe's 
neighbor 

36 End-ol- 
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37 Johnny 
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baseball 

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stack 

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51 Gridiron 
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hand 

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stuff 

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chloride 



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DIVERSIONS 

A waste of time — but you might learn something 



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COLORED GUARDS COVERING YOUR CAR 

WHFJ-LS. WOULD YOU BE A FENDER BLENDER? 

Today's Cryptoquip Clue; D equals H 



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Since only two weeks of class- 
es remain, it's likely students are 
swamped with end-of-the-semes- 
ter papers and projects So here 
are some excuses to use to get 
extensions on those papers and 
projects. Be warned, though: they 
might not work, 

I lave to floss my crt 

lw dedicated my Hfc to linguini. 




I want to spend more tme with my utendpc 

The president said he might drop by. 

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cheese sculpture. 

It wouldn't be fair to the other beautiful 
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I newt go out on days that end In V 
IprornBeatohefpafnendfoMrottlmaps. 
rm trying to be less popular. 
Irnwntmg a low letter to Richard Simmons 
Source: www,bof9o-ctm 



The planner 

Campus bulletin board 



The planner is the Collegian 1 ! campus bulletin board 
service. Items in the calendar can be published up to 
three times. Items might not appear because of space 
constraints but are guaranteed to appear on the day of the 
activity. To place an item in the Campus Calendar, stop by 
Kedrie 1 16 and fill out a form or e-mail the news editor 
at wiiegianmpub.kiu.edu by 1 1 a.m. two days before It 
Is to run. 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral 
defense of the doctoral dissertation of Rim Nayal at 9 
a.m. today In Fiedler 21 16. 

■Teach for America wilt have an Informational 
meeting 1 1 a.m. to 2 p.m. today in the K- State Stu- 
dent Union food Court. 

■ The next Students for Environmental Action 
meeting will be at S tonight in Union 207. 



■ The Graduate School announces the final oral 
defense of the doctoral dissertation of Chanitchote 
Detvtsitsakun at 9 a.m. Wednesday in Ackert 324. 

■ Business Study Abroad Advocates will meet 
at 4:30 p.m. Wednesday In Calvin 21 1 for an end of 
semester social. 

■ Sign up this week for Intramural J point shoot- 
out by S p.m. Thursday. Individuals or 4 -person teams 
can enter The cost Is $1 pel person plus tax. Competition 
wilt take place Saturday and Sunday at assigned times. For 
more information, visit www.recservices.ksu.edu/iminfo 
orcall(78S)5}2-69SO. 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral 
defense of the doctoral dissertation of Peng Lu at 2 p.m. 
frlday in Durland 1029. 



The blotter | Arrests in Riley County online at www.kstatecolkgianxom. 



Corrections and 
clarifications 

Corredions and dartfiutionjrun in this space 
Ifyoiseesorrwthingirvatshouldbecotnctect. 
cat news editor learn Sutan at (785) 5J2 
6SS6 or e mail a*g*m»spu6 km edu 

Kansas State Collegian 

(USPS 291 0201 The Kansas State Coaegjaa a 
student newspaper at Kansas State Uni*rary, 
tspiA»6hedt7yStuctoFub«catWBlnc, 
Kedae 103, Manhattan, KS 66506. The Col- 
legian rspubftshed weekdays during the school 
year and on Wednesdays during the summer. 
Periodical postage b paid at Manhattan, KS 
66502. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to 
torts^StateCo»ec>an r cicijlatjon desk, Kedfle 
103, Manhattan, KS66S06- 7167 
O Kansas State Coiegun, 2006 




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785-532-6560 



Union Program 



Council 



S"4 



Tuesday, November 28 



UPC All Meeting, Union Station, ground floor • 5:30 pm 
Help plan events. Everyone welcome and free food! 




v> 



Friday, December 1 



Film; Amille - Little Theatre, first floor • 8 pm, $1 

Also showing: Saturday, December 2 • 7 & 9:30 pm, $1 
Sunday, December 3*8 pm, $1 

After Hours: Poker Tournament - pre register by November 29. 
E-mail your name to upc@ksu.edu or call 532-6571. 



Saturday, December 2 



College Bowl Tournament - registration, second floor ♦ 8 am 



William T. Kemper Art Gallery 



Pete Souza, photo lournalist and former White House Photographer, 
November 30 - December 21 



How much would you pay to see Dane Cook? 



Take an online survey at www.k-state.edu /upc. 




jaaOtV 




The k-State Concert Band 
and Symphony Band 

IN CONCERT 

November 29, 2006 

McCain Auditorium 

7:30 pm 

Dr. Frank Tracz, Conductor 

Dr. Anthony Pursell, Conductor 

Darren Brooks, Graduate Conductor 

With Special Guests: 

Rob Smith - Composer and Conductor 

CVV2 Scott MacDonald - Conductor of the Big Red One Division Band 

Dr. Paul Hunt -Trombone Soloist 

• All KSU Band concerts are free to the public • 



# 



MUSIC 



1 



T 



Tuesday, Nov. 28, 2006 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 3 



Aviation program 

grants alumni status, 

honorary degrees 



By Eric Brown 

KANSAS SUTf COLLEGIAN 

While November if known 
as Aviation History Month, 
the K-State-Salina aviation 
and technology program has 
something else to celebrate 
this month. 

This November marks the 
40th anniversary of K- St ate - 
Salina's program, though its 
affiliation with K-State only 
dates back to 1991. The pro- 
gram began as Schillings In- 
stitute in 1966 and became 
the Kansas College of Tech- 
nology before the merge with 
K-State took place 15 years 
ago. 

In celebration of the 40- 
year milestone, President Ion 
Wefald and K-Statt are hon- 
oring those who graduated 
before the merge with degrees 
from K-State and are granting 
them official status as K-State 
alumni. 

"It was a very nice gesture 
of recognition," said Ken Ber- 
nard, an aviation professor at 
K- Stale- Sal ina who graduated 
from the aviation and techni- 
cal college in 1977. 

"It probably means a lot 
to the others to have an offi- 
cial degree from Kansas State 
University." 

Having been involved with 
the K-State-Salina program 
for more than 30 years, Ber- 
nard also noted the influence 
of K- State's 15 -year affiliation 
with the aviation and techni- 
cal program. 

"Merging with K-State was 
very important for this in- 
stitute," he said. "Before the 
merge, we were a technical 
college and could only of- 
fer two-year degrees, which 
didn't meet the needs for a lot 
of airline industries. Since the 
merge with K-State, we are 
able to offer internships to 
our students and have gotten 
a great deal more of recogni- 
tion from major airlines." 

One student who said he 
benefited from his education 
at K-State-Salina is Kevin 
Giefer, who is now a test pilot 
for Cessna Aircraft Company. 

"I really could have gone 
about anywhere after with 
what 1 learned at K-State- 
Salina," said Giefer. who re- 
ceived his degree in Decem- 
ber 2000. 

"I have friends from this 
program that have gone on to 
do air ambulance, commercial 



flights, corporate flights, test 
flights, just about anything 
This is truly a great program." 
lb further celebrate its 
40th anniversary, K-State- Sa- 
lina had a ground-breaking 
ceremony on the site where 
its new student center will be 
located and gave tours of the 
campus. 

MOMENTS IN HISTORY 
OF THE K STATE-SAUNA 
AVIATION AND TECH- 
NOLOGY PROGRAM 

■ The first classes were taught 
in fall 1966. There was a de- 
partment head, four faculty 
members and a secretary. 

■ In 1969, the Kansas Legis- 
lature dissolved into the State 
Education Authority, creating 
the State Board of Education 
and changing the College's 
name to Kansas Technical In- 
stitute. 

■ The Professional Pilot pro- 
gram was approved in 1986 
May 1987 saw its first gradu- 
ating class of seven students, 
all of whom earned Associate 
of Technology degrees in Pro- 
fessional Pilot. 

■ In 1989, contracts were 
signed for CAA training with 
Air Service Training in Perth, 
Scotland. Property was traded 
with the Sal ina Airport Au- 
thority so a new training facil- 
ity could be built to support 
this training contract. 

■ K-State and Kansas Techni- 
cal College merged in 1991 
The department had 60 air- 
craft and a faculty and staff 
of 31. 

■ In 1992, K-State-Salina air- 
craft were used for traveling 
on K-State athletic, recruiting 
and university business trips 
Helicopter pilot and aviation 
maintenance training also 
were offered in 1992. 

■ An avionics degree was 
added, and a Federal Avia- 
tion Administration certified 
avionics repair station was 
approved in 1992 

■ In 1995, K-State-Salina 
signed contracts to support 
NASA atmosphere research. 

■ In 2005, Steve Posset took 
off and landed in Salina for 
his record-breaking round- 
world flight in his Global- 
Flyer. K State Salina aviation 
maintenance students worked 
on the aircraft before take-off, 
and pilot students helped op- 
erate the central command 
station. 

Sourw: Km B«mart 




III Xa' 

Menu Guide 

in the back of 



Campus Phone Book 

Available in Kedzie 103 
Mon: - Fri. 8 a.m. -5 p.m 



Buffet offers quiet dining in Union 




Zsch SnycMK* 

J#f1IO* In 
management 
talks with 
Regan Thcwselt, 
Warrwgo, 
Kan., resident 
as they have 
lunch at the 
Bluemont 
Buffet Monday 
afternoon in 
the Bluemont 
Room of the 
K-State Student 
Union. 

Swv#nDoll 

COLLEGIAN 



By Emily Haug 

KANSAS STATE CQUE&IAM 

Overlooking Bosco Plaza 
is a dining option available 
to students, faculty and staff, 
and the public. 

The Bluemont Buffet is 
on the second floor of the K- 
State Student Union in the 
Bluemont Room and is open 
daily from 11 a.m. to 1:50 
p.m. 

Tina Griffin, food direc- 
tor for the Union, said the 
Bluemont Buffet began in 
1963 as a meeting facility and 
catering service, It has since 
evolved into a fine dining 
establishment with a quiet 
atmosphere, setting it apart 
from other food services on 
campus, she said. 

The daily buffet consists 
of a soup and salad bar, as- 
sorted side dishes, generally 
two entrees and one carved 
meal. The buffet also offers 
a wide selection of desserts. 
The all-you-can-eat buffet 
costs $7.25. Around holidays, 
specialty buffets are served 



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Patio is Open 

Now Taking Applications 



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for $7,95 

"The specialty buffet has a 
broader menu and is set up in 
the Union Ballroom with re- 
served seating," Griffin said. 
"The menu variety depends 
on the holiday. The next spe- 
cialty buffet will be served on 
Dec. 5." 

In past years, the Bluemont 
Buffet was not frequented by 
students. Recently, more stu- 
dents have become aware of 
the buffet. 

"Historically, it has been 
marketed towards faculty 
and staff, but this year we are 
trying to get more students 
involved," Griffin said 

To advertise the buffet, 
mass e-mails have been sent 
to the student body Fliers 
also circulate around the 
Union and on campus. 

Last week, the Bluemont 
Buffet offered a discount day 
when students received $1 
off their meals by presenting 
a student IDs when paying 
The next discount day will be 
in February. 

Zach Snyder, fifth-year 



student in management, said 
he enjoys eating at the Blue- 
mont Buffet. 

"It's something nice to do, 
and it has better food than 
the (Union) Food Court," he 
said. "It isn't really expensive 
either." 

Students often eat at the 
Bluemont Buffet now, but be- 
cause of its location, it has re- 
mained unnoticed by some. 

"1 didn't even know there 
was food on the second floor 



of the Union," said Ashley 
Klein, sophomore in bakery 
science. "I have had classes 
on that floor and just thought 
there were only classrooms 
and a ballroom." 

Reservations can be made 
for the daily buffet and spe- 
ciality buffets, but walk-ins 
also are welcome. A daily 
menu can be found on the 
first floor of the Union and 
outside of the Bluemont 
Room. 



ATTENTION 
SENIORS 



1 



fMcii *»r mm 

SENIOR StfftYEY, 

via «maif . Compteta 

th* s4»rve<A t» U* 

*ff 0lM« «9F FABULOUS prlz*s, 

daitatad bg Varn**A*s rfc**kst»r* 

- K-State Office of Assessment 




==J 




THE LEGEND IS GROWING. 

OMLY IM THEATERS DECEMBER 1 st 

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* 



OPINION 



Page 4 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Tuesday, Nov. 26, 2006 



Richards' rant 



Calling names sends nation into a frenzy, but U.S. public needs to quit pouting, move on 




Perhaps the only thing more clam- 
■■■ nusly Ignorant than has-been actor 
Michael Richards shouting "nigger" in 
the middle of a com- 
edy performance is 
the incessant way 
the U.S. public pouts 
around like a spoiled 
child on a school- 
yard. 

In their own 
unendearing way, 
the nation's eas- 
" ily offended saw 
i steaming plate of old brown and 
n'gan shoveling with both hands and 
lomanding more, and more they got 
1 realize the slander in question has 

I well deserved reputation of pain and 
buse, and we're all supposed to be 
indingly indignant about the actor 
rmerly known as Kramer tossing out 

I I le most unspeakable of all English 

i .i Igarities. But lo and behold, stand- 

■ ig guard on my torch and pitchfork is 
\\z. Margie Barnes, my kindergarten 
racher 

I'm entirely too damaged to re- 
nember any exact quotes from those 
lar away yean, but I'd venture her 
tvords went something like "people 
tvho call names are stupid, and people 
a ho get upset when they get called 
names are even stupider" Clearly, not 
everyone had the stupendous benefit 
. if a Ms. Barnes 

In good order, the NAACP. the 
ni'w Black Panthers and the undoubt- 
edly soon -to-be-founded Federal 
i )ffke for the Prevention of Hurt Feel- 
ings are whooping that Richards needs 

■ i get tossed in the clink, although last 
I checked neither being tacky nor be- 
nig a moron was an arrestable offense. 

Without a doubt, we're going to see 
new hate speech legislation tacked on 
'i our already idiotic hate crime laws, 
which imply there is a form of speech 
we should be concerned about other 
than free speech (and also that there is 




such a thing as a "love crime," but 
that is for another column) 

If we had 10 brain cells left to 
bump into each other in the grand 
republic, we could expect events to 
continue about like this: Richards 
would get his underwear sued out 
from under him, some high school 
dropout judge would award a bazil- 
lion dollars in emotional damages. 
and everyone would move on with 
their miserable lives. 

But being totally enmeshed in 
the great train wreck, we'll drag this 
damned thing on longer yet. Now 
[esse Jackson is involved, and race 
counseling, sensitivity training - oh 
yes, and more to come. 

My most unhumbled and elit- 
ist advice would be for everyone to 
get over the whole mess Instead of 
relegating a washed-up old fart to the 
catacombs of Internet fandom where 
he belongs, we've turned him into a 
household name - go us. More people 
now know the name Michael Rich- 
ards than ever did during the Seinfeld 
years. 

Being that crisis management 
teams have been brought on by all 
sides, the whole bleeding affair will 
drag on, step after unholy step. Now 
we'll endure a grieving period, a 
touching appearance recanting his 
past misdeeds and then the most 
important of all steps, the comeback 
- my wager is a movie with at least 
two big-name black actors. ! simply 




can't wait. Perhaps another stereo- 
type-busting neurotic white cop meets 
sassy black cop film 

Meanwhile, we'll have more news 
reports afraid to even quote our now- 
overblown tirade of galactic propor- 
tions. The "N-word" they call it. 



pandering to obsessive hand wringers 
incapable of hearing harsh language 
without launching their colon out of 
their nose, 

Sez me, we need to see about 
overthrowing the government and 
installing Ms. Barnes as Grand Pubah. 



Maybe she can smack some sense into 
this infernal place. 



Jonas Hogg h a senior in sodology, international 
studies and Russian. Please send comments to 
opnMft*>fpuaJov.«fcf 



Cities boost 'cool' factor to lure college graduates 





The number of baby boomers in 
the workforce is decreasing 

According to an article published 
by The New York 
Times, by 2012, 
for every per- 
son gained, 
two will be 
lost in the 
workforce 
This is fantas- 
tic news for us ALEX 
college-educated PtAK 
young people Too 
many of us go to college, practically 
owe the government our firstborn 
child in student loans, and then 
venture into the real world proudly 
bearing our newly earned degrees, 
only to get jobs In something 
completely irrelevant to what we 
spent so much time studying. Not 



to say a college degree isn't worth 
it, but wouldn't it be nice to go into 
an area involving what we studied 
intensely for at least four years? 

According to the article, several 
U.S. cities are beginning to respond 
to the decline in the workforce. 
Desired demographics, those in the 
24- to 34-year-old age range who 
have college degrees, apparently arc 
drawn to hip, lively cities. 

A few sites arc doing everything 
they can to become cooler. Some of 
the cities mentioned in the article 
were Atlanta; Memphis; Lansing, 
Mich; and Portland. Ore. 

Examples of the attempts to 
become trendy include renovated 
downtown areas, boosted night 
life and more activities overall. In 
Lansing, a trolley was created to 
commute people from bar to bar. In 



Portland, one company has given 
employees an opportunity to watch 
concerts during lunch and to play 
sports every day, according to the 
article. 

Since the number of working 
baby boomers is shrinking, and the 
number of young people also is 
smaller by comparison, like it or not, 
we are the economic future. But this 
is good news. We soon will be ill 
great demand. We - at least some 
what - are educated and hopefully 
capable of carrying out life after the 
baby boomers' successful genera- 
tion. 

Seeing as though we will be in 
such high demand and cities across 
the United States want us to come 
find jobs, live and boost their local 
economy, shouldn't we insist on liv- 
ing in the best conditions? 



1 say we require higher pay, four- 
day weekends, bar districts around 
every comer, arcades in all offices, 
full gyms and swimming pools 
provided by companies, and happy 
hours from noon to 5 p.m. Instead 
of malls and shopping centers, stores 
could come to us at work and home 
Our trendy age group seems satis- 
fied when our environment includes 
food and entertainment. 

If worst comes to worst, and no 
city or company will quite meet 
these outrageous stipulations, we 
probably still can make bank by 
going into geriatrics, seeing as how a 
huge age group of baby boomers will 
enter that stage in the near future. 



Mm Peak Is a seniof In mass communications. 
Pleast send comments to opinham ipvb.kiu.tdu. 



/*M * H S A S STATE 

Collegian 



tmUf UwTVnc* | ICKIOI IK (Hill 

Ktny Fltcrw | MMMiMG EDITOR 

Lhhh Sulnn | HEWS IWIOd 

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Courtney Staypan 1 MSI AD MA«KJ" 



WRITE TO US 

1 he Collegian welcome* your letters to the editor. 
They tan be submitted by e mail to ktftn&pvb. 
huedu, or in person to Kedae 116 Please include 
your full name, year in school and major. Letters 
should be limited to 250 words. All submitted 
letters may be edited for length and clarity. 



CONTACT US 

Kansas State Collegian 
Kedrie 103 Manhattan. KS 66502 

Display Ids. (785)512-6560 

Classified adv... (785)512-6555 

Delivery (785)5324555 

Newsroom (785)512-6556 

nn«@jpueisu.edu 



Tfi TH F PfllMT I * n *drtc-rial selected and debated by the editorial board and written after a majority 

lUlnLrvlMl | opinion is formed. This is the Collegian's official opinion. 

University should work to ease transfer 
from community college to K-State 



Communis colleges cany 
a stigma. 

Many university students 
think attending a community 
college is like graduating to 
the 13th grade. Some think 
students at community col- 
leges can't attend a four-year 
university. 

These beliefs are wrong. 

Many students choose to 
attend community colleges 
and benefit from their experi- 
ence. 

In fact the members of the 
editorial board who attended 
community colleges - one- 



third of the board, in fact 
- said it was a good decision. 
They said they received more 
benefits from their first two 
years of higher education 
than traditional four -year 
university students do. 

The advantages include 
smaller class sizes, lower costs 
and proximity. There is more 
student-professor interaction, 
possibly because most com- 
munity college professors 
aren't required to do research. 

Community college also is 
a great place to try a major 
because if it doesn't fit the 



student, he or she easily can 
find a more appropriate one. 

Some people might say 
there are not as many oppor- 
tunities at community col- 
leges as at K -State, but that is 
not true. The editorial board's 
transfer journalism students 
were able to attend confer- 
ences and meet people in the 
industry just as well as people 
from other institutions. 

With the advantages 
provided by community col- 
leges, more should be done to 
encourage community college 
transfers to attend K-State. 



CAMPUS F0URUM 
395-4444 -or- 

fourum@spub.ksu.edu 

The Campus Fourum Is the Cofle^n's anonymous 
call-in system. The Fourum is edited lo eliminate 
vulgar, racist, obscene and ftetous comments. The 
comments are not the optnion of the Colkecjldn nor 
»they endorsed by the editorial staff 

Ah, tin Collegian. Shouldn't It be 'Democrat to 
propose renstitingthe draff? 

Your htadlme, "Democrats to propose reinstat- 
ing draft," was about as accurate as one saying, 
"Repubkcans send sexually implicit IMs to underage 
pages" would be. Only one Democrat 6 proposing 
reinstating the draft 

fin going to put your notebook In my backpack. 

I'm going to study. Can you hold my book? 

I dare you to throw your sandwich at the bus 
driver. 

is there a good reason why Jonathan Garten's BCS 
article seems to be about basketball' 



Thbbthe entire fourum for today. Please check 
tomorrow's Coftegian for new comment*. 



< 



* 



A 



Tuesday, Nov. 28, 2006 



SPORTS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



What went wrong? 

The women's volleyball team didn't live up to hopes, recent seasons' records 



By Jeffrey flak. 
KANSAS SlAlECOLtECilAN 

The K-State women's volleyball 
team entered the 2006 season 
with high expectations and had 
its sights set on making a run at 
a Big 12 Championship. Instead, 
the Wildcats struggled throughout 
the season, suffering long los- 
ing streaks and close conference 
defeats. 

After starting the season with 
an 8-1 record and ranked in the 
Top 25, the Wildcats (12-18, 4- 
16 Big 12) took a free fall, go- 
ing more than a month without 
a win and losing matches they 
controlled. Here's a look at what 
went wrong; 

LACK OF DEPTH 

The Wildcats had just two regular outside 
hitters early in the season with senior Sandy 
Werner and sophomore Jenny lantsch. The 
two weren't able to generate enough offense 
(neither player had a hitting percentage high- 
er than 168), which forced coach Suzie Fritz 
to move junior Aape I, infra, pictured right, from 
libero to outside hitter on Oct. 7 

Lastra provided a spark for the Wildcats 
and finished the season with 187 kills, but it 
wasn't enough to turn the team into a consis- 
tent winner, 

5-GAME MATCHES 

Though the Wildcats finished with just 
four conference wins, they certainly had their 
chances to earn more. The Wildcats played 
six five-game matches, and they came up on 
the losing end every time. In a three-match 
stretch against Texas A&M, Iowa State and 
Texas Sept 22-30, the Wildcats lost all of 
their matches 3-2. 

That stretch was part of the Wildcats' 10 
straight losses. 





YOUTH 

It's no surprise the majority of top- tier teams 
in women's volleyball have a solid core of se- 
niors. 

The Wildcats had just one senior - Werner, 
pictured left - and could have benefited from 
more experienced players. Perhaps a battle-test- 
ed group could have found ways to win some of 
the tight matches. 

However, the Wildcats got a chance to play 
some of their talented underclassmen, who 
proved the future should be bright for K- State 
volleyball. 

A trio of middle blockers - freshman Kelsey 
Chipman and sophomores Megan Kroeker and 
Megan Parr - all had productive seasons. 

With 12 of 13 players returning to next year's 
team, the Wildcats might be talking about "what 
went right" come November 2007 

TOUGH COMPETITION 

The Big 12 Conference has never been short 
on quality teams, and this year was no excep- 
tion. Nebraska (No. 1), Taut (N*. 8), gaaw pic- 
tured right, and Oklahoma (No 13) all were in 
the CSTV/AVCA Top 25 Poll, and three other 
teams - Colorado, Missouri and Iowa State 
- are receiving votes 

As Fritz often said throughout the year, 
there's no easy match in the Big 12, and with 
the emergence of so many underclassmen in the 
conference, it's only going to get tougher. 




Fans need guidebook on rushing-the-field etiquette 



With college football entering its 
final stretch, a lot of exciting games 
are in store, and the number of times 
fans rush the field is sure to 
be high. 

After K State ended its 
regular season with a 39-20 
loss at Kansas, fayhawk fans 
stormed the field and tore 
down the goalposts. The 
action received a lot of criti- 
cism regionally. 

However, something I 
read on a message board 
later that week struck me. "There's 
no guidebook on rushing the field, 
so it doesn't really matter," were the 
words of one Kansas fan. 

It's true There is no guidebook 
on rushing the field. And I'm not 
claiming to be an expert on the 




subject, but some sort of rulebook 
needs to be made. Without one, this 
situation could get out of hand 

We might have fans storm 
the field after a win over Il- 
linois State. Students might 
tear down the PowerPoint 
projector after getting an A 
on a test. Who knows? The 
mailman could tear down a 
mailbox after making all his 
deliveries on time. 
Clearly some rules are 
necessary, so here is a rough 
draft of your first official "Guide- 
book for Rushing the Field" 



I ; Thou shall rush the field 
when an umanked team upsets a 

SeeGUIDtBOOKPage/ 




Curtnt Ramon | (OtltQAN 
Kansas fans carry a goal post from Memorial Stadium after the Jayhawks' 39-20 win 
over K-State 



PageS 



1-MINUTE 
DRILL 

Staff Reports 




FBC | Alamo Bowl appearance is 
early speculation for K-State 

Nothing will be official until Dec. 3 
after the Big 12 Championship game, but 
early speculation by ESPH.com contribu- 
tors Ivan Maliel and Mark Schlabach haw 
coach Ron Princt and K-State heading to 
San Antonio, Texas, to play In the Alamo 
Bowl. 

the Wildcats' opponent in the game 
scheduled to take place at 3:30 p.m. 
Dec. 30 would be Iowa, which Already 
has accepted an invitation to play in the 
game. 

Since appearing in the 2001 Alamo 
Bowl, the Iowa Hawkeyes have made four 
straight January bowl game appearances, 
including the 200} Orange Bowl, 2004 
Outback Bowl, 2005 Capital One Bowl and 
2006 Outback Bowl. 

Texas native and senior quarterback 
Drew Tate passed for 2,349 yards and 12 
touchdowns in 2006 to lead Iowa to the 
No. 2 passing offense In the Big 10. He 
Is now No. 2 at Iowa behind Chuck long 
in both career total yards with 8,143 and 
career total passing yards with 8,018. 
Tate's 59 career touchdown passes ranks 
No. 9 all-time in Big 10 history. 



VOL | K-State setter Spiegelberg 
named Big 12 Player of the Week 

K-SUte setter Stacey Spiegtfbfrg 

was named Big 1 2 Player of the Week In an 

announcement by the conference Monday 

afternoon. Spjegefoerg 

guided the Wildcats to 

their first two -match 

win streak infSg 12 play 

this season with wins 

over Texas Tech and 

Kansas to dose out the 

season. She b the fht 

K-State athlete to earn 

player of the week 

honors since 5ept 13, 

2004. 

for the week. Sptegefterg talked 95 assists 
(1357 apg), 18 digs (2.57 dpg), 10 kids (1 .43 
kpgl, nine service aces (1.29 sapg) and seven 
blocks (1 .00 bog). K-State hit 309 for the week 
with 113 kills, registered 27 total team blocks 
and tallied 24 service aces. 

In Wednesdays 3-1 win Hi Lubbock, Texas, 
Sptegelberg dished out a match high 58 assists, 
tallied 10 digs, recorded a match- and career- 
high five service aces, tallied five bh on* iS6 
hjtting percentage with zero attack errors and 
added n four blocks 

It was the nth double-double of the 
season for the/unior from Overland Park, Kan, 
and the 20th of her career. 

Duung the match, she became just the 
third player in the 32-year history of K-State 
voHeybail to record a quadruple triple for a 
season, surpassing triple digits m assets, digs, 
blocks and kids. 

In Saturday's 3-0 win over Kansas In 
Abeam Field House, Spiegelberg dished out 37 
assists, registered eight digs, jumped into the 
attack herself with five kills on a, 500 hitting 
percentage, dropped in four service aces and 
aided (he defense with three blocks. 




Spiegelberg 



Associated Press 

FBC | Iowa State hire Texas coach 
Chizik to take over football program 

AMES, Iowa — Texas assistant head 
coach and defensive to- coordinator Gene 
Chizik has been hired as Iowa State's coach. 

Cyclones 
associate athletic 
director Steve 
Makhowtold 
The Associated 
Press Chizik 
accepted the 
position. He 
will replace 
Dan McCamey, 
who resigned this 
month after 12 
seasons. 

A news conference was scheduled 
Monday evening to introduce Chizik, who 
arrived in Ames earlier in the day. 

Chizik came to Texas before the 2005 
season, and the Longhoms won a national 
championship in his first season. By the end 
of the 2005 season, Chi/Ik's teams had won 
28 straight games dating back to his years 
at Auburn, where he was defensive coordl 
nator for three seasons. 

In 2004. the Tigers went 13-0 and 
finished the season ranked No. 2. The Tigers 
had the nation's top scoring defense and 
ranked fifth in total defense that season, 
and Chizik won the Broyles Award as the 
nation's top assistant coach. 




I 



\ 



I 





ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT | SEX | FOOD | YOUR LIFE 

THE EDGE 



Mage 6 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Organized noise 




Sub Pop lUconfi | COURTISY PHOTO 



Prolific but twisted trio uses restraint to craft eerily beautiful experience 



The Air Force" 

Grade: A- 

Album rtvtow toy Mark Siblllt 

"Human Animal," the second 
Sub Pop- released album by the 
highly prolific Michigan trio Wolf 
Eyes, is a perfect example of a 
I noise rock band bringing method 
to its mayhem. 

"Human Animal" is much 
more cinematic and subtle than 
its predecessor, "Burned Mind," 
in that it builds tension through- 
out the album, rather than in 
each track, before abrasively 
releasing a sonic assault on un- 
suspecting eardrums. 

With "Human Animal," Wolf 
Eyes manages to construct its 
own savage world in which I 
can become immersed for the 
entirety of the album's 33 minute 
run time 

A pounding bass, metal clang- 
ing and a variety of gong rolls 
and hits begin album-opener "A 
Million Years" It slowly lulls me 
into the figurative forest of sound 
created by Wolf Eyes. 

An ever-impending sense of 
doom is felt with each thud of 
the ponderous bass. A short re- 
prieve is offered in the whistling 
of wind before I am sides wiped 
by atonal saxophone skronks 
and synthesized screeches - Wolf 
Eyes has cut out the lights, and 
there is nu turning back. 

f pass the "Lake of Roaches," 
which contains hissing warnings 
of what is to come. I ignore these 
forewarning; and trudge through 
the muck. 

Then my ears are filled with 
sounds of tortured animals and 
intense static feedback - per 
haps I should have heeded the 
roaches' advice 



In "Rationed Rot," thundering 
tribal drums slowly sound an ap- 
proaching apocalypse, I foolishly 
travel onwards, but then I hear 
the sound of a beating heart. 
Never has a sound that should be 
reassuring sounded so terrifying. 

The drums slowly crescendo 
while a disembodied voice spits 
fractured beat poetry about 
sewage, death and bile. 1 am 
soon unable to distinguish if the 
heartbeat I hear is something in 
the distance or the sound of my 
own heart ringing in my ears, 

A series of metallic screeches 
and scrapes joins the drumming, 
suffocating me with noise. 

I want to scream in horror, 
but I don't want to be noticed by 
those performing this horrible 
ritual. 

I then am dropped into an 
unnerving silence before all hell 
breaks loose on "Human Ani- 
mal." A fury of noise is released, 
and each percussive beat that 
pounds my impending annihila- 
tion sounds like heads violently 
crushed against a wall. 

Sharp, high-pitched squeals 
are emitted everywhere around 
me It's the shrieks of thousands 
of tortured souls creating a choir 
to Death himself. 

Finally, mechanized beats 
and scrapes join the cacophony 
- each one sounding like metal 
pistons mercilessly pounding 
bags of flesh and guts into mush. 

"Rusted Mange" is even more 
grotesque I am barely conscious, 
and I feel dizzy as I smell rotted 
flesh and hear the drumming that 
sounds like a sacrificial ceremo- 
ny 

But these are no ordinary 
drummers 

They pound too bard and 
too fast to be human With the 



FACTS ABOUT WOLF EYES 
Where It started 

Ann Arbor, Mkh. 

Who's in the band 

It started as a solo project of former 
Nautical Almanac band member Nate Young. 
Aaron Dilloway joined In 1999, and John 
MMjaMkJM 

What rt is about 

Featuring electronic, industrial and experi- 
mental musk, this noise band has released 
more than ISO recordings under labels like Bulb Records and 
Sub Pop Records Today, the band has releases Its own material. 

What bands sound like Wolf Eyes 

Manowar, Nurse with Wound, Smegma, Carolines Prurient, foe ceneld. Black Diet and 
Swans of Avon, according to AOL Musk 

Seam: Sab fop Records 




|WrXFEYIS 



tempo ever increasing, a voice, 
dressed in static, chants the 
prayers of the damned as a sea 
of shrieks envelops everything 
1 pass out and fall face first into 
the muck, 

I awake to the soothing sound 
of rain before an entrails -rum- 
bling bass reminds me of where 
I am - "Leper War" has begun. I 
regain my composure and wipe 
the vomit from my chin. But 
soon the saxophone returns, and 
I am affrighted immediately. 

All around me are the sounds 
of giant beasts laboriously 
breathing. Do they know I'm 
here? 

Then, in the distance, I hear 
"The Driller." The sounds of 
high-pitched drills, mechanical 
saws and other torture devices 
begin to rev I flee once I hear 
the first of the heavy thuds, 
which quicken with each hit. All 
sorts of noises rise around me as 
I desperately run, knowing no 
matter how fast, I won't escape. 
The last thing I remember before 



my capture is the ephemeral yelp 
of that sinister sax. 

I was not harmed by Wolf 
Eyes, and the sounds I heard 
produced were simply com- 
monplace for this triumvirate. 
Had my hallucinations all been 
brought on by the swirl of un- 
common sounds bored into my 
head? 

Perhaps, but this question 
wasn't to be answered as the 
band treated me to the final 
song in its oeuvre, a cover of No 
Pucker's "Noise Not Music," 

The band begins somewhat 
conventionally before piling 
sound upon sound, literally turn- 
ing the music into a barrage of 
noise. It was like 100 hardcore 
bands playing at once. 

When the last note of "Hu- 
man Animal" fades away, I am 
dropped back into reality. 

My journey was harrowing 
but entirely worthwhile. I cannot 
wait to immerse myself again 
into the perfect, noise-rock world 
created by this twisted trio. 




Tuesday, Nov. 28, 2006 

NEWS BRIEFS 

Pam Anderson divorces 
Kid Rock after 4 months 

NEW YORK (AP) — Pamela Anderson has 
Wed for divorce from Kid Rock after less than fouf 
months of marriage, the actress' publicist said 
Monday. 

Andersons (Dap right) 
representative said me 
former "Baywatch* star filed 
for divorce last week but 
would not comment on the 
reason or any particulars of 
the divorce- The split was 
first reported by People 
magazine. 

A publicist for Kid 
Rock (bottom right), whose 
real name Is Bob Ritchie, 
didn't immediately return 
messages left by The 
Associated Press on Monday 

"Yes, Ifs true,* 
Anderson wrote in a brief 
statement on her Web site. 
"Unfortunately impossible" 

The relationship between Anderson, 39, 
and Ritchie, 3S, has been a turbulent one since 
they became engaged In 2002. They broke up the 
following year, but then reunited and embarked 
on a tour of wedding ceremonies this summer. 

They were wed in late Jury near St Tropez, 
France, and again at a courthouse in Beverly Hills, 
Calif., on Aug. 3. They tied the knot a third time In 
an Aug, 1 7 ceremony in Nashville, Tenn 

Eariler this month, Anderson's spokesman, 
Tracy Nguyen, confirmed Anderson recently 
suffered a miscarriage. The pregnancy was not 
believed to be far along 

Anderson has two sons, Brandon, 10, and 
Dylan, 8, from her marriage to rocker Tommy Lee. 
Ritchie, a Michigan native who owns a condo In 
Nashville, has a 13-year-old son. Bob Jr. 



Alleged sex tape, release 
upsets actress Simpson 

Los Angeles (BANG) -With so much talk 
about celebrity sex tapes about to be exposed, 
we're surprised nothing has been revealed yet 
(except for Screech's threesome, but nobody cares 
to see that). 

Jesska Simpson has been another victim In 
the latest trend of celebrities who allegedly have 
a sex tape. 

The stunning blonde has been left reeling 
by rumors that her sex acts have been caught on 
camera and might leak onto the Internet 

The alleged X-rated home movie is said to 
show the "Dukes Of Hanard" actress and ex- 
husband Nick Lachey engaged in many sex acts. 

A source told Britain's Daily Sport newspaper, 
"Jesska h horrified her name and 'sex tape' are 
being mentioned In the same sentence. She's 
always been a girl of high morals and principles " 

According to reports, the tape does exist 
and has fallen into the hands of the individuals 
responsible for leaking the Pamela Anderson and 
Tommy Lee sex video. It has been claimed they 
are threatening to leak the tape rf Simpson does 
not pay an undisclosed sum of money to keep it 
out of the publk domain. 

The 25-year-old star has always prided 
herself on making men wait for sex. 

She once said, "I play hard to get If you turn 
sex down for a couple of days, it makes it better* 

lachey is now dating MTV presenter Vanessa 
Minnillo. while Simpson allegedly has been 
dating singer John Mayer 



'Sex and the Chy inspires 
Lohan's personal life 

Los Angeles (DPI) — When It came to 
Lindsay Lohan's sex life, her biggest inspiration 
came from the lives of four women in one of 
televisions biggest TV series — "Sex and the 

ay: 

The 20-year-old actress insists the hit show, 
which focused on the love lives of four single 
women In New York, taught her to avoid settling 
down with one guy. Lohan admits she is quite 
happy seeing lots of different people. 

'My mom is going to kill me for speaking 
about sleeping with people, but I don't want 
to put myself in the position where I'm in a 
monogamous relationship right now," she stated 
In a recent Interview with [He magazine. 'I'm not 
dating just one person. 'Sex and the City' changed 
everything for me, because those girls would 
sleep with so many people* 



BUTTERED I Sexy vs. Steve 




4 



1 



s 



mmmmmmmmmm 




Tuesday, Nov. 28, 2006 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page? 



GUIDEBOOK | Exciting finishes earn field-rushing 



Continued from Paye 5 Rair 



Tbp-10 opponent 

Some could argue this 
should be increased to a Top- 
five opponent. But if an un- 
ranked team manages to beat 
albp-lOteam, it qualifies as a 
rather large upset and grants a 
rushing of the field 

However, it should be noted 
a once-prominent team (within 
the last two years) should not 
rush the field If Florida State 
had managed to beat Florida 
last Saturday, it would discredit 
the team if fans had rushed 
the field. Not too long ago the 
Seminoles were national cham- 
pions, and storming the field 
after an upset would say they 
were inferior to Florida. 



t There shall be a rushing 
of the field when a team breaks 
a long losing streak against its 
rivaL 

111 go ahead and set the 
mark at 10 straight years with- 
out a victory. A school break- 
ing a long losing streak to a bit- 
ter rival is grounds for storming 
the field Notice the use of the 
word "long." A two- or three- 
year losing streak is not nearly 
long enough Missouri fan* 
didn't storm the field Saturday 
after snapping a three-game 
losing streak to the Jayhawks. 



> 5: Thou shatt rush the 
field after an (incredibly rant) 
exciting finish. 

When the excitement of the 
final seconds of a game takes 



over and students feel like 
rushing the field after a "Hail 
Mary" victory or a last-second 
touchdown, it is appropriate. 
When California beat Stanford 
on the famous "The band is 
on the field!" play, it was more 
than justified to rush the field. 

These rules arc just a starter. 
Obviously they need some 
tweaking, and more could be 
added. Kansas fans shouldn't 
be at fault for rushing the field 
after their win over K State 
There wasnt a guidebook 
Now there is, so take notice. 



M0I OHM tt 1 MROf m |Hwlt JOWTVMBfTi 

Ptoaw seed comment! to tpsrts <sfpuc. 



MARSHALL | Mechanical engineering student 
to earn master's, possibly doctoral, degree at Oxford 



Continued from Page 1 

Biomedical engineering 
is a field Kitten has been in- 
volved with at K-State. 

She now is performing 
research on the use of ele- 
mental signatures for stand- 
off bomb detection and the 
use of neutron activation 
to analyze the wear rate of 
the acetabulum due to a hip 
prosthesis. 

During her guaranteed 
two years abroad, Kitten 
will cam her master's degree 
and, if granted a third year, 
her doctorate. 

Kitten said she wants to 
pursue research into pros- 



thesis at the Rehabilitation 
Institute of Chicago. 

Already a scholarship 
winner at K State, Kitten Is 
a National Merit Scholar, a 
Kassebaum scholar, a Presi- 
dential Scholar and a recipi- 
ent of the National Clare 
Boothe Luce undergraduate 
scholarship. 

Since 1986, K State has 
been one of the top state 
university producers of Mar- 
shall scholars. 

Beaten only by the Uni- 
versity of California at 
Berkley and Arizona State 
University, K-State has had 
10 Marshall scholars in the 
past 20 years. 



The Marshall scholarship 
provides 40 students each 
year the funding to stud} 
abroad. 

The scholarship include.*, 
university fees, cost of living 
expenses, an annual book 
grant, a thesis grant, research 
and dally travel grants, and 
fares to and from the United 
States. 

The value is estimated ai 
about $70,000 and is spread 
over two years of study with 
a possibility for a third, ac 
cording to Media Relations 



ADvnrrBwc SM-tw 



/"M » It S » S S 1 I t I 

Collegian 



CLASSIFIEDS 



To place an advertisement call 



I — L || II 

I ■■ ,, | L . ; 



II II 

: L' 



■ i 1 1 ii 



• i 



LET'S RENT 




ONE-BEDROOM NO 

smokers. 1021 Fremont. 
Was utMlbee Included. 

January Ihh Monday- 
FrMay 788-776-4805 




FOUfl-OEMOOM, 
bath Fenced 
garage. Psta 

785-317.7713. 



yam. 
Ok. 



CLASSIFIED ADS 

LET THEM WORK FOR YOU 

Kansas State collegian 

103 Kedzie • 785-532-6555 





LEARN TO FLY1 K-Stale 
Flying Out) has five air- 
planes and lowest rata* 
Call 785-778- 17*4. www- 

»su edu/kslc 




Loel and found ads can 
be pie c ed tree for three 




ONE -BEDROOM, walk to 
class No drinking. Smok- 
ing, or pet s 785-539-1554. 

TWRH. WUA. Plv-J SJV 

PLUS BEOfiOOMS Look- 
ing for ttial perfect home 
10 rent? Great (election 
and price* Capstone 
Management 
785-341-0888. 

TWflH- SeVeV8E&- 
ROOM houses near cam- 
pus lor next year. June/ 
August teases al have 
central air. ful Wtehene, 
and washed dryer Call 
now for beat setoctton 
785-341-1897. 

rwirmwm 

HOUSE. Avalafals Jan- 
uary t. 2007 Ctoee to 
campus. No pete. Call 
786-539-1975 or 

785-313-4465 




FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted, • January - July. 
Big five-bedioom duplex 
indudett Ml jepplianoes, 
olt-atreef periling. Beauti- 
ful place, wonderful room- 
mates. Cat Courtney 
318-210-6975 

FEMALE SUBLEASE 
needed for two-bedroom, 
two bath epanment. 
Brand new. Washer' 
dryer. Waking distance to 
campus. 786-545-S108. 



needed tor January- July 
tour- bedroom house 
J3O0 per month plus one- 
fourth utHftWa Weeherr 
dryer, dishwaaher In- 
cluded 620-271 2068 

fTmalf! — &UBLEASEA 
needed tot two-bedroom 
two bath apartment Con- 
tact Coiista at 
785-543-4258 Available 
January 1 

fTmalT 



SUBLEASERS NEEDED 
spring 2007 tor three-bed- 
room, one and one half 
bath apartment, one 
minute wa*i to campus. 
1780 per month or S260 
per person plus electricity. 
Corned: rigrayflkau.edu 
or 913-481-1334. 

THREE ROOMS available' 
for sublease in three-bed- 
room, one bath lor Spring 
ir. One block from 
917 Moro. 
9330/ 
785-317-1283 



SIAIEaser 




15X60 THREE-BED- 

ROOM, two bath. Vary 
nice Please can. 

785-494-2883. leave mes- 



Uanhettan CITY Ordi- 
nance 4814 assure* ev- 
ery parson equal opportu- 
n fh/ln housing without dta- 
llnctlon on account of 
race, set. familial status, 
military status, disability, 
religion, age. color, na- 
tional origin or sneeetry. 
Vlolattona should be re- 
ported to the Director of 
Human Resources at City 
Hall. (785)587-2440. 




Close to campus, off- 
street parking S4O0 a 
month utilities Included 
913-981-0673. 

FEMALE 5UBLEASER 



FEMALE ROOMMATE 
needed Immediately, 

Clean newly remodeled 




MANHATTAN CITY OtdJ- 
nence 4814 assure* ev- 
ery parson equal opportu- 
nity In houalngwfthoul dla- 
tlnclton on account of 
race, eei, tamlllal statu*, 
military atatus. disability. 
real glen age, color, na- 
tional origin or enceatry. 
Violations should be re- 
ported to the Director of 
Human Reaourcee at City 
Hall, (785)687-2440. 

ONE OR TWO-BED- 
ROOMS available now or 
January 1 Only a taw left, 
S295 and up. Hurry! Cap- 
stone Management 
785-341-0686. 

ONE-BEDROOM, 
CLOSE to campus in 
newer complex No pets. 
785-313-7473. 

TWO-BiZOROOM ONE 
and one-half bath apart- 
ment m quiet neighbor ■ 
hood Available Jan 1. 
1420 Beechwood Ter- 
race. S710K month. 785- 
341-9898, 



washer; 1 dryer. Cat 
785-620-7812 

FEMALE ROOMMATF 
wanted who loves pats 
and Is neat, quiet end re- 
sponsible Rent 1310/ 
month Including uttmes 
Private bam First month 
free with January start 
Can 785-537-8807 tor de- 



FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted Share three-bed- 
room private home Seri- 
ous students only $325 
plus one-third ulHHiea Pre- 
fer lease through summer 
7B5-539-6782. 

RESPONSIBLE ROOM- 
MATE warned. Quiet 
neighborhood two maes 
from campus. Washer/ 
dryer No pets (275/ 
month plus one-forth utM- 
ttet KeHy 785-566-8136 




TWO-BEDROOM/ ONE 
bath townhouee $850.00, 



TWO-BEDROOM ONE 
bath S275 each, plus utili- 
ties On* block from cam- 
pus Need two spring sub- 
lease™ Call 
820-474-5900 ask tor 
Bryan Armendertz 



2007 

eeme eta r $330/ month 
Available January - May 
Nice, newer, three-bed- 
room house, bultl 1897 
786-221 -2282 

fTmaTi! — §UbI£asefi 

needed Rent S255 plus 
utilities Oil-street parking, 
washer/ dryer, no pats, no 
smoking, tour •bedroom 
house, Katie 

785-230-7288. 

TemaTE — sWeTsTR 

wanted to ebare tour-bad- 
room/ two oath apartment 
First month free, $316/ 
month. Available now 
through July 2007. 
907.232-4801 

MaTI SUBLEASE* 

needed in January $300 
per month, plus one-third 
ullHlies Three-bedroom, 
two bath Cal 
785-3422932 

maTE SUbLEasEr 

needed Spring 2007. 
dose to campus. $300 
par month plus one-half 
utilities Please caH Bran- 
don Bayiess 
7 85-230-05 1 i 

MALE SLlflLEASEfi 

wanted. Close to campus, 
and dryer, tour- 
rent $370. 
by January 
785- 282-0899 

muDAocii Ml 

apartment, three minutes 
from campus No psta. 
$450 par month. Cal 
913-634-0674 available 
December to August. 

sUBIeASEr UeEded 

lor Spring 2007 semester 
S3 1 5 par month Four -bed- 
room apartment January 
rani paid. 786-418-1778 



«« Waocat Property at 
766-537.2332 




THE COLLEGIAN cannot 
verity the financial poten- 
tial of sdvertlsemente In 
t»e Employ mart/Career 
classification Readers 
are advlaed to approach 
any such business oppor- 
tunity with rea- 
son able cau- 
tion. The Collegian urges 
Our reader* to contact the 
Better Business Bureau, 
601 SE Jefferson. 
Topeke, KS 86607- 11 80. 
(784)232- 0454. 

4 OLIVE'S Wine Bar now 
hiring lunch cook*. Flexi- 
ble hours, compel/live 
pay Apply In person 3033 
Anderson Avenue. 

APPLICATION SUPPORT 
Analyst position available 
al Steel 8 Pipe Supply 
Position Is responsible for 
business process design. 
tesllng. training, and sup- 
port. Qualifications in- 
clude B.S In bualnata, 
computer science, or re- 
lated Held Musi have gen- 
eral knowledge of bust- 
Inter 
should 

submit resume to Person- 
nel Department App Sup- 
port Analyst. PO. Boi 
1668, Manhattan, Kansas 
66505 Equal Opportunity 
Employer. 

APPLICATIONS PRO- 
GRAMMER position aval- 
able at Steal 6 Pipe Sup- 
ply Primary runefton Is to 
develop reports, eppHca- 
ttons, and rnlernei func- 
tionality and support 
server and PC hardware/ 
software Qua locations in- 
clude Computer Science 
or related degree or five 
years equivalent experi- 
ence. Detailed knowledge 
of JAVA. C, or C++ pro- 
gramming laguagee and 
added plus Candidate* 
should submit resume to 
Personnel Department, 
Applications Programmer, 
PO Box 1688, Manhat- 
tan. Kansas 66505. Equal 
opportunity employer 




AVIATION KANSAS 

State University at Saana 
invite* appHcaliona tor an 
Department 
For detaSs via* 
www.aal.ksu.edu or email 
ddelkerOksu edu Can 
785-826-2983 Affirmative 
Action/ Equal Opportunity 
Employer. 

BARTENDING 1 1300 a 
day potential No experi- 
ence necessary Training 
provided CaH 

i 600-965-6520 em 144 

^TT~ .-'MNASTICS A 
Dance In Warnego is seek- 
ing a dance Instructor for 
jazi, tap & dogging 
classes and gymnastics 
tor 



EXECUTIVE D4RECTOR 
Manhattan Area Habitat 
tor Humanity serve* both 
die Riley County and Pot- 
tawatomie County area* 
In Kansas. The Executive 
Director maneges Via slid 
ale's dally operation* and 



RANDALL'S FORMAL WEB DESIGNER Award 

Wear is looking lor a part- winning advertising 



can 785-468-8488 tor addi- 
tional Information, ask tor 
Angle Curtis. 

COMMUNICATIONS ANA 
LYST oosrfjon available at 
Steel & Pipe Supply Co. 
Qualified candidate will be 
able lo manage IP and 
Legacy Phone Systems 
Candidate will be respon- 
sible lor management of 
ail Communication con- 
tracts, maintenance con- 
tracts, and service con- 
tracts Attention to detail 
and ability for thorough 
documentation is desired 
General IP networking ex- 
perience and willingness 
to learn new technology is 
required- Interested candi- 
date* should submit re- 
sume to Personnel Depart- 
ment Communications 
Analyst, P.O. Box 1868 
Manhattan, KS 66505 
Equal Opportunity Em- 
ployer 

COOK NEEDED SI Westy 
Community Care Home 
Competitive wags, flexible 
scheduling Contact 
Nancy. Highway 99 and 
Main Westmoreland. 
785-457-2801 

CREATIVE DIRECTOR 

CrvicPtu* is the nations 
leading provider ol City, 
County, and School web- 
sites. This Is a kill-time. 
Manhattan based posi- 
tion You will be In charge 
of directing the creative 
process, Including brain- 
storming with staff, meet- 
ing with customers and 
providing the creative vi- 
sion necessary to give our 
Customers outstanding 
and award winning web- 
sites Salary commensu- 
rate with experience Ben- 
efits include health, den- 
tal, paid holidays, paid va- 
cation and 40 IK match- 
ing. Email resume In Mi- 
crosoft Word or text for- 
mat to fobs® civ icprus.- 
com, include cover letter 
explaining your capebili- 

Ues 

EARN $2500+ monthly 
and more lo type simple 
ad* online wwwdelaen- 
trytypers.com 

EARN $800 $3200 a 
month lo dnve brand new 
cars with ads placed on 
them www AdOrivsTsam.- 
com. 



creasing tundraWng ef- 
forts In order to sustain 
the organization a* a vi- 
able community resource. 
Supervision of one part- 
time staff parson also re- 
quired ResportsMMfaa In- 
clude the implementation 
of polcia*, procedure* 
and actions at approved 
by the Board of Directors 
(and reccommend same) 
perseverance of public ac- 
countability, and providing 
assistance to oommfttees 
(Church Relations. Family 
Selection. Nurture. Devel- 
opment, Restore). QuaHfl- 
csllons indude a passion 
tor Habitat tor Humanity's 
mission; proven experi- 
ence In a non-profit organi- 
zation ( administration, 
grant writing, creating and 
maintaining community re- 
lationships, fundralsing); 
excellent Interpersonal, 
written and verbal skills; 
and the ability to handle 
multiple tasks, meet dead- 
lines, speak publicly, and 
participate as a learn 
player. A familiarity with 
home construction is a 
plus. Exceptional account- 
ing skills and finance un- 
derstanding are required. 
This is a three-fourths 
arm position; compensa- 
tion dependent upon quail 
ncattont and experience. 
Applications available by 
comaebng JoAnn R. Sut- 
ton. President, by calling 
785-341-4225, email sul- 
tonemhaks org, or by ve- 
rting the web al www.man- 
hatlanareahsbrtat.org. Ap- 
plications must include a 
minimum oi three refer- 
ences Resumes and writ- 
tan correspondence 
should be mailed to: 
Jo Ann R Sutton, Presi- 
dent. 1800 Denholm 
Drive. Manhattan. Kansas 
66503. 




STtTra DESIGNER 

CivicPlus Is die nations 
leading provider of city, 
county and school web- 
sites Both toll-time and 
work at-home (contract) 
poaNton* are available. 
Full-time benefits include 
health, denial, paid holi- 
days, paid vacation and 
401 Ik) matching Email 
resume and design sam- 
ple* to fc*s»cMoplu*.oom 

KIRN EWfBE 

DISHWASHER NEEDED. 
Shifts 10am - 3pm on 
Mon-Wsd-Frt and/ or 
Tuee-Thurs. Some night 
and/ or weekend avaaabl- 
tty. Apply m parson al 418 
Poynti Ave. Good Pay. 

HELP NEEDED concrele 
mixer driven full or part- 
time must have COL li- 
cense can or stop by Val- 
ley Concrete Operations, 
22820 Highway 24 M 
Behrue Kansas. 

785-458-6499 Free em- 
pioyrnenl drug screening 
Grael lor student* looking 
tor part-time work. 
KiELF- WAWtW: KSU 
Beet Cattle Research Cen- 
ter Contafl Matt Quinn 
at 785-539-4971 or 
mjq Okau.edu. 

UysTEAy sHoPPErs. 

Earn up to $150 Experi- 
ence not required Under- 
cover shoppers needed to 
|udge retail and dkwig es- 
tablishments. CaH 
600-722-4 79V 

p'rogpammEr CiVIC 

PLUS is the nations lead- 
ing provider of city, county 
and school webeMas Full 
- Urn* position In Manhat- 
tan. Microsoft ASP or 
SOL experience required 
$14.50/ hour plus health, 
dental, paid holidays, paid 
vacation and 401(k) 
matching Email resume 
to Microsoft Word or text 
format to job*«r^v»cpiu* - 
com. 



f 



ADVERTISE. 



I 



ouetomer service 
FVexfole hours great 

starting wag* and commis- 
sion program. If you 
would (ike to bin our team 
•top by and M out an ap- 
M 100 Manhal- 
Center Ma*. 
785-770-9011 

SALES CIVICPLUS Is the 
nations leading provider 
of city, county and school 
websites This full-time po- 
sition In Manhattan has 
atonrltoant income poten- 
ttal for the right Individual. 
$24,000 base plus ayyiaa 
stye commission sched- 
ule. Benefit* include 
health, dental, paid holi- 
days, paid vacation and 
401 (k) matching, Emaa 
resume In Microsoft Wort 
or ant format to tobs*)- 
cMcpkjs.com. 

System's aUaLVST 

sMon available at Steel S 
Ptoa Supply Co. Qualified 
candidate win be able to 
accurately troubtoshooi 
hardware and software is- 
sues and provide detailed 
technical assistance to 
the end user tor a" PC 
and peri p heral systems. 
Cisco networking, Mi- 
crosoft Server, and 
VMWare experience Is 
preferable Two - Five 
years experience and or 
education In Server or Net- 
work Management I* re- 
quired. Interested candi- 
dates should submit re- 
sume to Personnel Depart- 
ment. Systems Analyst. P- 
Box 1688 Manhattan. 
Kansas 66505. Equal op- 
portunity Employer 

tjUiner CIVICPLUS is 
the nations leading 
provider Of City, county 
and school webaHes 
This lull-time position in- 
volves training end-users 
at both our Manhattan of 
flee as wet as at our client 
sites across the US. Posi- 
tion requires the ability lo 
speak In Irani ol smsJ 
group* and a good under- 
slandlng of MS Wort. 
Benefits indude health, 
dental, paid holidays, paid 
vacation and 40i(k) 
matching Email resume 
In Microsoft Word or text 
format to jobs(»civlcpius ■ 
com 



opar/ web designer Some 
training provided Apply al 
com. 




1990 CHEVY Blazer 
LOTS of receni work, rune 
great I $2000 or Best Offer. 
765-226-1620 




*1 SPRING Break Web- 
sftel Low Prtcos Guaran- 
teed Group discounts for 
6+. Book 20 people, get 3 
free trip*! www.Spring- 
BnMlidkjCOunts.com or 
800-838-8202. 

DOUT MISS out! Spring 
Break 2007 Is approach- 
ing and STS Is offering 
specials to this years 
hottest destination si Call 
tor savings 

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6 
3 

7 5 



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Pages 




KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Tuesday, Nov. 28, 2006 



reception closes student's thesis exhibit 




Doll 1 1 01 l&l AN 

Su« Atchison, tawtrodor Of art talks wtth Amanda Small, graduate student In fine wts, about one of Elizabeth 
James 1 art pieces during the doting reception Monday evening In the WWiamT. Kemper Art Gallety. 



By Kr Irtln Hodges 
KAKSAS STATE COIL tG!»N 

Elizabeth fames has 
worked with clay for more 
than 20 years, but only her 
artwork from the last three 
years was showcased in the 
William T. Kemper Art Gal- 
lery the past two weeks (or 
her Master of Fine Arts thesis 
exhibit 

For the end of the exhibit, 
people gathered to congratu- 
late fames and view her art- 
work during the closing re- 
ception Monday night 

fames' exhibit, "Clay 
Ground," was in the K* State 
Student Union gallery, which 
features work from students, 
faculty, visiting artists and 
alumni, 

"I'm very inspired by the 
outdoors," she said. 

fames, graduate student in 



ceramic*, said she worked on 
her pieces for three months 
but spent three years research- 
ing before creating the work. 

Since the exhibit is now 
closed, fames will sell some of 
her artwork and exhibit other 
pieces, she said. 

In her artist's statement, 
which hung on the wall 
among the different works, 
fames wrote, "My forms are 
multiple assemblages that 
combine contrasting clay 
bodies, glazes and surfaces 
that are not direct representa- 
tions of this environment but 
rather borrowed elements or 
essences." 

fames said she plans to 
continue teaching ceramics 
in the future and exhibiting 
throughout the world. 

Yoshi Ikeda. professor of 
art, said he has been fames' 
ceramics teacher for three 



years 

"She used to do functional 
things," Ikeda said, "but now 
she's making art. That means 
she's grown quite a bit." 

He said fames used to make 
a lot of pitchers and bowls but 
now makes all types of ceram 
ics. 

Amanda Small, graduate 
student in ceramics, said she 
attended the reception be- 
cause fames is like a mentor 
to her and she wanted to sup- 
port fames' work. 

"We love Liz," Small said 
"She's a really great teacher 
A lot of people that came to- 
night were students of hers " 

Small said she liked see- 
ing the show and how all of 
fames' artwork came together. 
Small said it gave her a sense 
of pride to see what kind of 
work the Department of Art 
can produce. 



Community colleges offer lower tuition, living costs m>**££* 



By Austin Appta 

KANSAS STATE COtlFMN 

As tuition at traditional four- 
year colleges rises, more stu- 
' dents are looking to save money 
j by attending to community col- 

I leges, living at home and partic- 
ipating in the Reserve Officers' 
Training Corps 

When students enroll at a 
community college, they cut 
.significant costs, said MargE 
Shelley, director of enrollment 
management at Johnson Coun- 
ty Community College in Over- 
land Park, Kan 

Community colleges have 
a lower cost and offer morn- 
ing, night and weekend classes, 
Shelley said. 

. ENROLLMENT NUMBERS 

I Pat Bosco, dean of student 
Ilife, said he hasn't seen any 
change in enrollment Bt K- State 
since enrollment at community 
has increased. 
"We have experienced re- 
cord enrollment over the past 
several years," Bosco said. 

K-State has partnerships 
■with some community colleges, 
■ Bosco said. 

We take pride that students 
pick K-State over community 
colleges in the state," Bosco 
said. 

Enrollment at community 
colleges like ]CCC and High- 
land Community College in 



Wamego, Kan., has risen in re- 
cent years. )CCC has had a 22- 
percent rise in enrollment from 
fall 2005 to fall 2006, Shelley 
said. Current enrollment is 
19,000. 

"At Highland Community 
College, enrollment has actually 
been down a little bit this year," 
Registrar Alice Hamilton said. 

However, college enrollment 
for the state of Kansas as a 
whole has been down from pre- 
vious years, Hamilton added. 

LIVING AT HOME 

Some students choose to live 
at home because it saves them 
the cost of room and board. 

"It saves me rent, which is 
usually $400 or so," Russell 
Wohler, freshman in biology, 
said. 

Although students save mon- 
ey living at home, it isn't always 
easy 

"The hardest part of living at 
home is that you are still living 
with your parents, so it feels just 
like high school," Wohler said 

High school graduates want 
to leave home after graduating, 
and their parents want them to 
move out, too, Wohler said. 

Sometimes students attend a 
community college before trans- 
ferring to a traditional college. 

"I went to Highland Com- 
munity College to get my gen- 
eral education stuff out of the 
way" Wohler said. 



Wohler had a 1.0 grade point 
average and was forced to drop 
out of K-State five years ago, he 
said 

Wohler has lived with his 
parents in St. George, Kan., 6 
miles east of Manhattan, since 
birth, he said. 

COSTS OF LIVING 

There also are costs students 
would pay if living in a resi- 
dence hall, fraternity, sorority or 
scholarship house. 

Residence halls have dining 
centers that cost a student up to 
$2,956 per semester, depending 
on the meal plan 

To live in a fraternity costs 
about $2250 a semester, while 
sorority living costs about 
$2,430. 

Smurthwaite, a leadership/ 
scholarship house for women. 
charges $2,300 p«.T aaJMhi for 
room and board, while Smith 
Scholarship House for men and 
Clovia 4-H House for women 
cost $1,800 and $1250 per se- 
mester, respectively 

TUITION AND FEES 

According to the K-State 
Web site, K- State's tuition for a 
Kansas resident is $172.50 per 
credit hour, while out-of-state 
students pay $497 per credit 
hour 

At Highland, tuition is $45 
per credit hour for a Kansas 
resident and $95 per credit hour 



for an out-of-state resident 

In-state students pay $127.50 
more per credit hour to go to 
K-State than they would pay at 
Highland Out-of-state students 
pay $402 more per credit hour 
at K-State. 

However, K-State s other fees 
add to the cost. Students pay a 
S302 privilege fee for amenities 
like the use of Lafene Health 
Center and Peters Recreation 
Complex if they are enrolled in 
more than 12 credit hours 

Students who are enrolled in 
fewer than 12 hours pay $71 for 
the first credit hour and $21 per 
credit hour through the 12th 
credit hour. 

At Highland, students pay a 
campus fee if they take courses 
on campus. If students take 
courses at a regional site, they 



r 



200 Pizza Rolls & 

Chicken Nuggets 

Vr Price Martinis 

»1» Any Pints & Wells 

*2" Domestic Bottles 

Kitchen Open at 4pm 

Now Taking Applications 




TUBBY ' S 




s 2 m Wells 8 Shots 
s 3°° Energy Drinks ft Big Boys 

Nip/luck Tuesday 

'Come enjoy the show. . . at 9pm + 



J Come enjoy the show... at 9pm 
On Big Screen 



Mon-Tu«s< 



'2am * Wed-Sun 1 1 : J0am -2mm 



World AIDS Day 

December 1st 

Events for the weak, 

November 27 - 30: 

AIDS information table sponsored by 
SHAPE and Lafene Hearth Center 
"What's Your Sign?* t-shirts for $10 
K-State Union, 1 1 :00 am - 1 :00 pm 
Nov. 27 - Courtyard 
Nov. 28, 29 & 30 - Food Court 

December 1 : 

- AIDS Walk - Bosco Plaza at 4:45 pm. 

Ends at Varney's. No fee. Hot chocolate and cookies 
(Thanks to Varney's. Bluestem Bistro & Planet Sub.) 

- Quilt piece dedicated for the AIDS Memorial Quilt. 

December 2: 

- Art AID - Art auction in Union Ballroom, 6 - 9 pm 

Call Health Promotion, 785.532.6595, for more info or check 
website: vww.k-sta1e.edu/lafene/SHAPE/AIDSday06 htm 




provided 



the 



t 




pay a regional fee. 

ROTC 

Nate Beeman, sophomore 
in business administration pre- 
professional, said he saves mon- 
ey on tuition through the ROTC 
program at K-State. 

"I am on a four-year scholar- 
ship through the Army It pays 
for everything and then gives 
me a stipend each month for 
room and board," Beeman said. 

Although most students at- 
tend community colleges to 
save money, some students 
just aren't prepared to attend a 
four-year college right after high 
school. 

"Some students aren't ready 
for a traditional college yet," 
Hamilton said. 




Dean YarM. Ebadi cordially invites you 

to the Kansas State University 

College of Business Administration 



Distinguished 
Lecture Series 



rm 



^ 



Stephen M. Lacy 

President and CEO 
Meredith Corporation 
Wednesday, November 29 
Lecture: McCain Auditorium 
10:30 a.m. 



sponsored by 

USf Commerce Bank 

^J fjF Member FD1C 

and 



The William T. Kemper 
Foundation 




in the 



Kansas State Collegian 

JlhKMlzie • 7Htf>-S;i2-6&fiu 



I 



. % _. _ i iiii rrmmmin »n i 




IT 



Jewelry guide Page 2 1 Gadget guide Page 2 1 Presents for your pooch Page 3 1 Gift baskets Page 4 1 Online shopping Page 5 

; ) 



Page 2 



HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE 



Why to buy: 

Necklaces: "I didn't know 
wfial lo buy you, but you're 
a girl arid most girls like 
necklaces." 





Rings: Whether or not Its for engagement or 
mrrtiM these (an symbolize friendship ot 
faith lliey (an draw attention to your fingers 
and hands. • 



Bracelets: "You already 
had a watch, so this will 
balance the other side" 
Bracelets can give the 
illusion of long arms. 



JUL 




Earrings: "Vou already have 
the matching bracelet and 
necklace, and I'm not ready to 
give you the ring," 



Alex Pm*. | MH4AS iWf COLUGIAN 



\0BREL 



Imaginative ft MM Designed 

)) HANDMADE 

GIFTS 

Vory Affordable to Spiun j<- 

s/fS and DESIGNS 



« A Diverse and Inspiring Collechon ol Art Glass: Vases, 
Ornomenls. Bowi$, Paperweights Sculptures. Marbles. 
Bum feeders. Nature Themes etc 

• A Fun Variety ol Melodious rWrld Chimes 

» Sterling Stiver Amber, Art Gloss, and - ' 

GGrmtono Jewelry 

• Contemporary Clocks 

• Unusual Boxes ■ Wood, Glass 
■ Ana Much More 

OL4SS IMPRISSIONS MS SJ» 4610 

32t fcoyrilT Downtown Man Kail on 

Msr> fnlOJO ■HO'SatlO-S-Sunl-HOK On»«) ~' 



Tuesday, Nov. 28, 2006 



Jewelry suits 
almost everyone 



Jewelry is a gift that can be given to anyone, 
guy or girl. Some popular items include neck- 
laces, rings, bracelets and earrings. 

When giving advice to customers who are 
buying for others, Allison Zuk, sales clerk at 
Krystallos Inc., suggests necklaces, 

"I would say people can mostly stick to 
necklaces," she said. "They are fairly inexpen- 
sive" 

Depending on the recipients, there can be 
different tastes for different age groups, Zuk 
said, but colorful jewelry is always good. 

"It depends on the season,'' she said. "Dark- 
er colors like brown are better for the winter, 
and bright colors are more for the summer" 

With regular, casual jewelry, sterling silver 
is a good pick, Lindsay Berry, Krystallos Inc. 
sales clerk, said. 

"You can do what you want with it," Berry 
said "You can dress it up as much as you 
want." 



7K5-532-65MI 




Gadget Guide 

Whether they re truly practical or 
unnecessarily extravagant, here 
are a few of the years hottest gizm 

Turbo Phone Charger 

$19.99, Jht Sharper image 

Ideal for The friend with whose cell phone is glued to her ear. 

DcsofptJMi: Wrtfi the turbo phone charger, one AA battery can charge a phone for as much 

as two hours of talk dtrte. The model available at mt Sharper lmoot.com also comes with 

adapters for almost every well-known cell phone brand, This gift b convenient for power 

outages, contaaing the world when stranded in the wilderness, or when on the line with an 

extremely talkative friend. 

• Adapters for almost every well-known cell phone brand. 

• Charges phone for two hours of talk time with one AA battery. 
•Weighs less than lot 

• Specific brand models available from large retailers like Wal-Mart or your cell service provider 



USB Beverage Chiller 

$19.99, IhtokGttk.com 

Ideal for The friend with a severe Facebook addiction. 

Description: This handy contraption, which plugs into any USB port, keeps drinks coot and allows 

you to stay at your computet even longer. The coldplate chills to 45 degrees Fahrenheit. A similar 

product the USB mug warmer for only S 1 2 99, keeps d rinks he !. 

• 5 -foot cable length 

• Connection via USB 
•5.25*1 3.25' 1 1.4' 

World's Smallest Space Heater 

$ J?. 95, The Sharper Imagt 
Ideal for Your friend In the residence halts 
whose window won't quite shut. 
Description: Anyone who has lived in 
residence halls can tell you that sometimes 
it can be a challenge keep more than 300 
rooms set to just the right temperature. 
With this gadget you can Uhe matters 
Into your own hands. The heater 
Includes a tip-over safety switch and a 
fan-only option. 
• ISO mm of heat 
•'Soothing' Blue LED 

• 4*i3'xJ' 

• Weighs It. 





(Splash Splash-proof IPod Speaker and 
Wireless Transmitter 

$99. 95, Iht Sharper Image 

Ideal for The person who needs a back-up band when he's singing in the shower. 

Description: An all purpose splash-proof speaker system for your i Pod. This system Is 

not just limited to the iPod, it can transmit radio, TV or pretty much anything up to 1 SO 

wet. 

• Special offer for bonus speaker 

• Audio jack for wired transmissions 
■ Wireless iPod dock has ISO-foot broadcast range 



Phillips 9-inch Digital Photo Frame 

S249.9S, Jht Sharper Image 
Ideal for The proud, computer- literate grandparents. 
Description: Like a prop from the set of The toons," this digital picture 
frame can display up to SI 2 MB worth of pictures on an 8-Inch LCD screen. 
Create slide shows that zoom and pan, or set it to show holiday pictures for 
each season. 

• Holds TOO- 150 photos at 720 1 480 pixels 
• Uses rechargeable battery or AC adapter 
• Interchangeable brushed metal, black, white or red frames 



Gltt 

Certificates 

Available! 



j|B > ' } "$ew» BIG foryoir 
f special someone! 

$10 6nf |$25 0FF 

; any purchase ; £ ; any purchase 

; over $50 I a \ over $100 



ami MS* 

Dew efhirt^ ttiitwwry, jrtttm ifdt, |ih kay, red wty IwMay Nnnil <#■ 



Tu/n Mr>M< r nn Tin he 




Mey—Babyy 



111 MAHHOTAN AVE. 
IHAGGKVIUi 



liSaF* 



*11 royntj AM • ru*»d*r Su»«tf • JIT 





Antiques 
Collectibles 




Holiday 
pedals 



. vstajre-.com 
322-C SeaHwlwl M • (Tweet Sheeting Outer) • IM-S3»-7000 



jfeJfrGrft Certificates • Gift ^ts^JL 
Stocking Stuffers 




25^-5^? 



512Poynrr 776-4794 



'Services performed by 
supervised students" 



I 





Manhattan Arts Center 



O nc of a kind gifts! 

4«» 200tf Wrap ItCjp 

art exhibit and sale 

November S - ^December 27 
'Mon-fh 10-5, Sat 10-4, Sun 12-4 

New works dally. Lots of Items under $100. 
Clay, glass, Jewelry, paintings, photography, and more. 

i.hiuit sporiMjuxi by j.h> k tame* Hv,,i: nd DMhja Karen Naj 



r'rklay, December 1 at 8 pin 



Swi*ifrCityJoi#fr preswJty 
KSU Student Combos 

Com* hear the next generation o( great jazz musician*. 



M 



Saturday, December 2 at 8 pin 



Vfl 



AtMlSa 



flCPWSttti 

w.utsi-e series, 




£i*,Qlr/ songwriter 

Mark Brtlli 

*> Mr.uk rwtirkHJb 



Dec eniher 8 cV 9 



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fri, Peefl at 8 pm 
^3at, Dec 9 at 7 pm 



[cadence 



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Tuesday, Nov. 28, 2006 



HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE 



Page 3 



Stocking stuffers 
bring fun, utility 




KANSAS SWKOIUGMH 

SALT AND PEPPER SHAKERS 

Vibe mini magnetic salt and pepper balls 
are more conversation piece than utensil. 
Squeeze the tops of these unusual shakers 
to grind salt and pepper into your food. 
When you're finished, stick them on the 
fridge, target, $9,99 




WRAP 



T 




CARAMEL CORN BODY WASH 

Temptations Crazy Caramel Com 
three-in-one body wash, bubble bath 
and shampoo brings the decadent 
smells of butter, rich caramel and va- 
nilla to the bathroom. According to 
the bottle, it's "highly addictive" At 
the least, it has fewer calories than 
the real thing. Check out the Wick- 
edly Hot Chocolate and Spicy Gin- 
gerbread scents, too. Bath & Body 
Works, $5 for 4 ounces 



IPOD SWEATERS 

These knitted "sweaters" keep any size of iPod cozy and protect- 
ed. The package has four sweaters in different colors, so you can 
give them all to one person or spread the joy to several friends. 
Wal-Mart, $4.88 



NFL FLASK 

This stainless steel flask is just the 
right size for a stocking ... or a pocket. 
It's a good option for sports fans who 
already have too many T-shirts for 
their favorite teams. They are avail- 
able for any NFL team and for many 
other sports leagues. GuntherGifts. 
com, $25 



REINDEER POOP 

A plastic reindeer that dispenses candy pellets from its hind 
end? What more could a kid want? This inexpensive novelty 
item would be a good filler gift, even for the older people on your 
shopping list. Wal-Mart, $1.88 



Top it off with ribbon 





Use stylish, affordable packaging 
to draw all eyes to your holiday gifts 

This holiday season, package presents with style. 
Anyone can buy a nice bag and a bow, but these inter- 
esting packages will leave plenty of funds for the gifts 
inside. Get your list, check it twice, and wrap up your 
holiday shopping with a festive but frugal touch. 



1, lake out box the cUuc Chinese food toki lutbw 

hile snowMi !<■■• futll mbellnhed with a lurquonp hpduVd li . 

rjfeal findfoi us price bui then r a large election 

2. Latched Canister - ThlUAmstei m tun way lopad lift I uteri 
decorative [wpei and topped with a bow, thin, Itkel} 1 1 be one of the firs! cjifl< opened 

m 

Tip: i ira mall increas p large) armteri are available and inal ft basket 

container 

1. Brown paper box frm will add variety to ail nl Ihe department store boxes undei 

the tree f he boxr> come in all ^h.ipes and size and are easy to decorate oi ttet impaqt' 

They tan be retted to hold keepsake-., (oi years to come We decorated a round I * with 

pappi (ii)iiic and a green ribbon /toMy 

(fntspei ibfetfotptipei 

4. Paper sacks A Iwrsl on ih'> l>rwn bag tunchsrickv Paper qift sacks.) 

able in a variety of prints and colors. The tun bags make wrapping a synch 2nd ate I great 
buy These are perfect for the person who needs to wrap a lot of small gifts tjun M , 
Hobby lobby. 5 hi SI 

Tip: Fold over the lops of the bags, punch two holes and string with curling ribbon Ui t 
blown or while lunch bags with a fun tag or ribbon 

5. Mason jar A simple mason jar might be sitting in your cupboard right now t ill the 
jar with tissue paper or shreds ,ind line the lid with tissue paper or cotton fabric Tie 

bon around the lid and top with a holly spnq or another embellishment I'" a festive twist 
on Grandma's preserves Hobby lobby. $1.27 tor tbe jar, 25 cents lor si/* bolly 



Already have plain shirt boxes? No worries. A few 
dollars will dress them up: 




1. Instead of curling ribbon, us* si* ribbons, tie In a bow and top wrth a holiday 
sticker or seal. Wal-Mart 97antsforaS-yanlspool 





EmllyLawran£*|C0ILE(4«* 



m 



I. Pair a printed ribbon with a textured strand of miniature tree garland and 
top with a miniature ornament Hobby lobby, Wants fotQariaMSlMforll 
ynomftakt omments 




i. Tag away. 
Don't forget to 
make sure the 
gift gets lo its re- 
cipient, from a clas- 
sic tag stamped for the 
holidays in an affordable 
engraved ornament strung 
on a sheer ribbon, the gift is 
sure to get noticed. 

Wal-Mart, 99 ants for U blank tags, Wants 
for an enamvedbrasi ornament 








Holiday Specials 



All of 

20% off All Retail 

$30 Full Set or Nails 

$14 Eyebrow/Lip Combo 

lon/TuM/Wotf of December: 

$80 2-Color Foil 

With Haircut 

$52 All Over Color 
With Haircut 




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FINE LINE INC. 

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Tuesday, Nov. 28, 2006 



HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDC 



Page 4 



Presentation 



Fashioning themed baskets can make 
typical presents more attractive, personal 



By M*fl»n Mour 

KANSAS STXTKOUEOAN 



Your gift need not be the biggest or the most expensive, but it always should be the best-look- 
ing. One way to ensure it gets the attention it deserves is to put it in basket form and surround 
the main gift with complementary items that follow a central theme. Gift baskets are often easier 
than wrapping and more fun for the recipient. 




T* 

■ SM the bottom of the 
corrtalner with Mi tissue 
or newspaper so the gift 
basket looks fuller 

■ the items with different 
colors for contrast, or stick 
with a certain color scheme 

(Ml 

• Use tissue paper, metallic 
shred, or curling ribbon to 
finish off the basket Final 
touches bring the whole 
thing together . 



Book Worm Basket 

■"AWanWithoutaCountry; 
KurtVonnegut 
Somes and Note, $22.75 

• Hershey's Cacao Reserve mildly 
spiced drinking cocoa 
Wal-Mart $2.88 

•Black mug 
Jargtt$l99 

■ Millstone Colombian blend coffee 
DltkmXSI 

• Radina's Coffeehouse and Bakery 
gift card 

• Ghirardelli dark chocolate squares 
Wal-Mart. 8S turn 

• Timberland throw blanket 
Target $U99 



Movie Buff Basket 

• Theater-style mioowave 
popcorn bucket 
8Mbitmvtdta$L89 

■ Milk Duds and Junior Mints 
in theater-style boxes 
Wal-Mart, SScems 

• 20-ot Pepsi 
HW-AtartJf.W 

■ "Pirates of the Caribbean: 
Dead Man's Chest" 
Wal-Mart $15.87 



Student movie tickets 

VamtytBot*Sm$i.SO 
Best Buy or Blockbuster 
gift certificate 
The Great Movies,' 
Roger Ebert 
SormondKoblt $19.95 



•Tea bags 
•Candles 

•Book marks or book tags 




Less obvious movies 
make better gifts 



By Br»nd»n Pntgtr 

KANSAS STATE QUEGIAN 



Any grandma can pick up "Cars" or the 
latest Disney movie as an unoriginal gift, 
but you probably want your gift recipients 
to know you spent more than five minutes 
picking out a DVD, Here are some choices 
to let the people on your shopping list know 
you care (unless they read this, too; then your 
secret is out). 



For aspiring musicians 

This is Spinal Tap" (1984) 
Their band will totally make it one day. 
When that day comes, they'll need to 
avoid the dangers of tame mixed with 
an Inflated ego This film will snow 
them how to walk the fine line between 
stupid and brilliant. 



For the hard of hearing 

*Ben-Hur A Tale of the Christ" (IMS) 
Don't be scared away by the fact that 
it's a black-and-white silent film. It's a 
story about betrayal, revenge and Jesus 
with some amazing action scenes. It's 
only available in a boxed set with the 
Charlton Heston remake, but it's worth 
the extra effort 






Other basket ideas 

r, shred or 



(Mktatts Itafctt 

.froanmargarHaor 



Sports Basket 

■ Portable gr» as the basket 



•Stwfalbotooiyfbetr 
•Apart of piaytno car* 

■ SnyMbagsofpnUrtsor 



• Paper codruil napkins 
-MhiafhrnboMes of alcohol 
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Otwath* p*pf uinbnlas 
or drink sorters 
Canister of salt or sugar 
cherries ore 



■ Matches, charcoal 

• Sewn octets for the persons 
fa write turn 

• AT^rmwsweatshit 

• Gatorade, beer or soda 

• Snicks 

• Small or deflated ball 
mifchmg the sport tickets 



Itiflwtnt 

■ Wee soaps, bubble baths or 
body washes 

• Sorted candles 

• * shower puff or toofch 

■Anlttllufrytuweiw 
bath woe 

• Gilceriikatefwamanloitr, 
massage or spa treatment 

• PakrdfWp-fcpt 
■fel eye mask 

i, manicure 






■km 



For potheads 

"Blow" (2001) 

Inspire your friends to rum their 
legally questionable hobby into a 
profitable business endeavor ... or a 
hefty prison sentence. 





For those experiencing 
hair loss 

"Find Me Guilty" (2006) 
This story about a mobster who 
defends himself in the longest mafia 
trial in US history Is vin Diesels first 
non-bald role. It's also his funniest 
(except for maybe "XXX," but this time 
you'll be laughing with the movie, 
not at It). 



For future parents 

"Raising Arizona"! 1987) 
This movie could be an excellent 
resource for those dealing with the 
financial strain of parenthood When 
they're not robbing convenience stores, 
breaking out of prison or kidnapping 
babies, the characters in this movie 
are usually dysfunctional but always 
endearing. 



Book selections 
can be tailored 
to personalities 



By Mtgan Mowr 
KANSAS STATE CQUtGIAIi 

Books make great gifts; they are entertaining, 
portable and require no batteries Pick a book 
that fits the recipient's interests, and it's sure 
to be appreciated. To make the gift even more 
personal, inscribe a message on one of the first 
pages in lieu of a card. Here are some good op- 
tions if you don't know where to start. 




For your roommate 
*l am Charlotte Simmons' 
Tom Wolfe 

Charlotte, the naive, over 
achieving protagonist, doesn't 
stay that way for long. As she 
mates her way through her 
freshman year of college, she 
encounters parties, cheating 
and date rape — things 
foreign to her Hi her sheltered, 
small -town life at home. 
Realfstk, funny and candid, 
this book will prove to be a 
nostalgic account of freshman 
year for some, a warning for 
others. 




For the sports 1 

The 8f iod SMe: Evolution of 

a Game" 

Michael Lewis 

This brand-new book from 
the author of "Moneyball" 
and 'Coach' is a great gift for 
any football fanatic. The story 
follows a disadvantaged black 
teenager who is Uken in by a 
white evangelical family and 
eventually becomes an agHe 
300 pound left tackle for Ofe 
Miss. Lewis' insight Into the 
workings of college football 
combined with his ability to 
craft true stories into a read- 
able narrative make this book 
a great gift. 




For the kid in your life 

"The Night Before Christmas' 
pop-up book 
Robert Sabuda 

Sabuda, a master of paper 
engineering, has combined his 
artful and elaborate pop-ups 
with the classic Clement C. 
Moore poem "Twas the Night 
Before Christmas." Children are 
sure to be enchanted when 
eight reindeer jump out of the 
book or when an entire village 
materializes on the page You 
also might have a look at his 
other books, like Sabuda s spin 
on "The Wizard of Oz" 




For the person who 

doesn't like to read 

"A Photographer's Life: 
1990-2005' 
Annie Leibovitz 

Legendary portrait pho- 
tographer Annie Letbovitt 
showcases her best work from 
the past 1 S years. It includes 
photos of Michael Jordan, 
Johnny Cash, Nicole Kidman 
and Nelson Mandela Leibovitz 
also has photos of her family 
and friends and the siege of 
Sarajevo during the 1990s. 
This coffee-table book Is a 
little more pricey than a novel 
but worth the expense. It Is at 
once Intensely personal and 
universally appealing. 




For your most 
opinionated friend 

'Freakonomks" 
Steven D. Levitt Stephen J 
Oubner 

Old Roev. Wade cause the 
sharp drop in crime in the 
1990s? An award winning 
economist and a New Yort 
Times writer believe it did, and 
they go to great lengths to 
prove it in'Freakonomks; 
Levitt's claims, which some 
call radical, are nonetheless 
thought-provoking and well 

supported. Despite fo subject 
matter, the book is easy to 
read and has short chapters 
that need not be read In order 



( 



I 



— ' . 



Tuesday, Nov. 28, 2006 



Holiday Gift Guide 




'age 



Adopted families 
get necessities, gifts 



ByUc*yD.M»ckay 

KANSAS 5WF.C0UEGWN 

The holiday season m a time 
for giving. But some families 
don't need gifts, they need the 
bare essentials. 

The Flint Hilts Breadbasket 
runs the Ad opt A Family pro- 
gram during the holiday season 
to assist these families, 

Natascha Phillip, executive 
director of the Flint Hills Bread- 
basket, said her organization 
works hard to match families 
with donors. 

"We want it to be a good 
experience on the donors' side 
and family's side," she said. 

The response of donors is 
strong every year, Phillip said, 
with groups, individuals and 
clubs expressing an interest in 
being involved in upcoming 
years. 

"We get nothing but positive 
comments," she said. 

The program provides warm 
clothing and necessities for each 
person in a household. Toys are 
requested for the children. 

To qualify for the program, 
families fill out a detailed sheet 
of information about their 
household and income Last 
year, the program provided gifts 
for 719 families. 

Phillip said the sign-up for 
this year is not complete An 
emergency sign-up will be avail- 
able Dec. 6 for families who for- 
get to fill out their paperwork 
for the program. 

Even with a good start to the 
season, the program is in need 
of individuals and organizations 
willing to adopt a family over 
the holidays. 

"This program it so much 
different," Phillip said. "We give 
you details about the family We 
let you know why they're going 
through problems. It lets the 
donors feel like they know the 
family" 

While the Breadbasket's 
main goal is to feed hungry 
families, Phillip said the orga- 
nization wants to help families 
that don't have money to spare, 
especially during the holidays. 

There's more than just food 
securities," she said. "We want 



them to know your kids are 
taken care of ." 

Emily Lehning, assistant 
dean of student life and coordi- 
nator of New Student Services, 
said New Student Services has 
been involved with Adopt-A- 
Family for years. Campus tour 
guides and office workers have 
shared in the tradition even be- 
fore Lehning started at her posi- 
tion five years ago. 

They look forward to it ev- 
ery year," she said. 

The enthusiasm for the pro- 
gram has carried over each holi- 
day season. Students sign up for 
gifts they want to buy for the 
family, and during finals week, 
gift wrap is available in the of- 
fice for students to wrap their 
presents. 

This year, the office's adopt- 
ed family is a single mother with 
two children. 

"This is something our of- 
fice does together," Lehning 
said "As far as the team aspect, 
that's what makes it so special 
and unique for us. Sometimes, 
students pool money together 
and go shopping for the gifts to- 
gether." 

Putnam Hall, which has been 
a part of the Breadbasket's pro- 
gram before, will receive its fam- 
ily during the first two weeks of 
December, said Kelly Eilert, hall 
governing board president and 
junior in psychology. 

To encourage hall residents 
to participate, a tree filled with 
ornaments with the needs of the 
family is placed in the lobby of 
Putnam. Students take an orna- 
ment, purchase necessities and 
gifts, wrap them and place them 
underneath the tree. 

The hall sponsored an eight- 
member family last year. Eilert 
said residents are looking for a 
similar family this year. 

"We try to find the biggest 
family we can," she said. 

Being a part of the Breadbas- 
ket's Adopt- A ■ Family has been 
a way for the hall to do some- 
thing out of the ordinary to cel- 
ebrate the season. 

"We wanted to do something 
that was away from the norm of 
Christmas," Eilert said, "and it's 
a way to give back." 



Shop online at these 5 sites 



Uncommon Goods 

www.maxnmongo0di.am 

Thn site's slogan, find anything but ordinary," holds 
true Hen you'll see offbeat gift ideas and fun (tuff 
few an apartment or dorm room Uncommon Goods 
also has jewelry, accessories and office supplies 
you can't get at Staples. Impress your office mates 
with a $ IS desktop dodgeball set Check out the 
secret agent tampon case, paper bag vase or the 
therapy flashcards. Some items are a little pricey 
- the $3700 Road Tested Chair is a real working 
Walk/Don't Walk sign from New fork City — but 
some things are worth splurging. 



Urban Outfitters 

www.urtHmoutfyttn.aim 

Urban Outfitters Is a place to get gifts with an 
edge. Its men's and women's clothes and acces- 
sories look more like they came from a vintage 
store or boutique than from the Gap. The bolero 
style Kimchi and Blue Pompom Cropped Sweater 
for $68 is a trendy alternative to traditional winter 
sweaters. For men, the flannel shirts make for a 
warm layer over thermal tees or graphic T-shirts. Items 
lot the home, including dishes, pillows and art, are 
eclectic and fun, but the holiday items are the best 
Kitschy and sometimes gaudy ornaments look at home 
In the diverse decor of a college residence If youte 
nostalgic buy the Frogger and Space Invader mini 
arcade games for $24. 





Great authors pM belly figures, $18 




Eastbay 

ivww.eostMv.airn 



table knit arm 
warmers, $11 



It's no fluke Eastbay has been around since 
1980 It remains one of the best sources for 
shoes, fan apparel and other athletk gear. 
Shop here for the perennial favorite. Air 
Jordans The Jordan Mens XXI is $149.99. Get 
inyMtas Cowboys Item your heart desires, 
like ttekw^sleewtraWnc. camp ihwfci 
$24.99 On the women's side, Eastbay has a tot 
of great deals on sneakers; the Puma Speed Cat 
in baby blue suede h $49.99, down from $74.99. 
Eastbay is also a great place to find accessories like 
Fossil watches and Oakley sunglasses. 




T-tWrt, $24,99 




Popcom hat, $28 
Convertible mittens, $18 






Sephora 

www.itptma.com 



Sephora is the mecca of beauty supply. Boasting hundreds of upscale brands Me 
tlinique, fOccltane and Shu Uemura, Sephora is the place to shop for high- 
maintenance types. Not ail Its products 
are expensive, though The site has 
categories for gifts less than $25, 
$2S-$S0 and more than $50, making 
shopping on a budget easy. One of the 
best holiday items is Philosophy's The 
Ski House, a set of three products that 
comes in a cute, house- shaped box 
and features marshmallow, hot cocoa 
and peppermint scents. Perhaps the 
best gift Idea, though, is the Sephora 
Fragrance Gift Certificate for $50. The 
recipient gets a box of 10 perfume 
samples and a certificate for a bottle 
of his or her favorite one, taking the 
guesswork out of giving 




Crystal encrusted 
Yankees cap, $69.99 

All Posters 

www.aHposttn.conr 



Deck the walls this season; buy posters 
as gifts The images at Ail Posters range 
from humorous to high art, and prices 
range from $2.99 to more than $100 
for big pieces or prints. All Posters has 
categories for sports, movies, foods 
and beverages and more. Find Vincent 
van Gogh's "Starry Night* in any sue. 
from 4 inches to 5 feet tail. All Posters 
also has a targe selection of photogra- 
phy. Those from the lonely Planet and 
National Geographic collections are 
among the best. Posters are shipped 
in a sturdy cardboard tube unless you 
order one framed. 




Andy Warhol poster, $27.99 



Fragrance gift eertrfiute, $ SO 



Compiled by Megan Mowr | COLLEGIAN 



10% Off Items In 
Our Winter Catalog 

X^lafLn Rooki and t^ppiet 



[Give 



Wtoe 



of the 

reason 



# (jrl 




Certificate % 

Pita Pit 




We 
Deliver! 




FROM THE STAFFS 

OF THE 



ic 



KANSAS STATE 

OLLEGIAN 

\ 





e Holiday Season is Herpl 

Spread the Cheer by 

Finding Unique Gifts 

for everyone 
on your list! 







For the Artist in your life: 

Art Kits for Adults and Children 

For the Kids in your life: 

Childreris Books 

For the K-$tate fans in your life: 

K-State Apparel and Gifts 

For the Teenies in your life: 

Cell Phones, MP3 Players & more.. 




I 




VADMY*i 





°okstC** 



Happy Holidays K-State! 

Visit both our locations: 

The K-State Student Union Bookstore 

and Varney's in Aggie ville 



/ * 



T 



K 



Page 6 



HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE 



Tuesday, Nov. 28, 2006 




resents 



If tile most important person on your shopping list birt a person at all, check out 
Clair* and Harieyl A Dog Bath & Boutique, 10SN. 3rd St The store carries treats, 
clothes and other products that make great gifts for a special occasion. ^ v 



*tni_i * i - . 



:$J1 



>^L 



Fortune cotWot: $8 per box 




T<iMrtK$lM20 








M D*g Wfyta tki jacket: 

$**-$48, depending on size 



KOllECUH 




LMshai: S 10-512, depending on < 

PR 

FORTHEgJJ 

WITH 



[ poodle peanut butter-flavored 
dog donute $5.25 









118 KEPZIE* 785-532-6560 COLLEGIAN 



w 








cai) ne t 

EXCITE© 

too!!! 



$1 f 



&S 
v 









Smoked 



am Smoked Furkeij 

rr. 

Cheese & Meat Mow Serving Soup 

9'H bcx.i for Lunch 





an i la 

Dairy Bar - Ice Cream - Meat Sal 

533-1293 M-F 7 



r 



am-Upm 



T 



i 




y^K A N S A S STATE INSIDE 



COLLEGIAN 



Dancing and 
donations took 
center stage 
TUesday night 




www.kslatccotlcgian.coin 



Police 

caution 

against 

jury scam 



Oy A u it in Apple 

KANSAS 5 TME COLLEGIAN 

The Riley County Police Depart- 
ment is warning citizens to be aware of 
a scam involving jury duty 

According to a news release, the per- 
petrator calls the victim and tells them 
they were summoned for jury duty but 
failed to show. 

After the perpetrator explains to the 
victim there is a warrant being issued 
for their arrest, the perpetrator asks 
to verify some information to have it 
cleared, said Patrick Tiede, detective 
and Manhattan Kilty County Crime 
Stoppers coordinator. 

"Since the victims do not want to be 
arrested, they give the scammer their 
social security number and date of 
birth," Tiede said. 

So far 1 1 states have been hit with 
this scam, including Oklahoma and 
Colorado, Tiede said 

"Do not give out your social security 
number or any other information over 
the phone unless you know who you are 
giving the information to," Tiede said. 

Those who feel they have been a 
victim of this scam are asked to call the 
RCPD at (785) 537-2112. 



Wednesday. November 29, 2006 



Votlll.No.69 




K-State launches world's largest 
course-podcasting initiative 



By Leann Sulzcn 
KANSAS STATE COLUGtAN 

Now more K-State stu- 
dents will be able to get 
their information for 
class from pod casts 

K-State launched the world's 
largest course-podcasting initia- 
tive with Tegrity Campus this fall, 
which offers the capability to con- 
vert about 6,000 class recordings 
to podcasts for students. 

The Tegrity system is not new 
to K-State, said Scott Finkeldei. 
assistant director of the Office of 
Mediated Education. Professors 
have been able to use Tegrity to 
videotape themselves, capture 
their audio and show annotated 
slide shows since 1999. Each 
year, K-State pays $32,000 to use 



the Tegrity system 

For the past several months, 
the university has had the op- 
tion to convert these recordings 
into podcasts almost automati- 
cally, Finkeldei said. More than 
140 professors are taking advan- 
tage of the podcasts, which are 
multimedia files users aan access 
on the Internet and play back on 
Mp3 players like an iPod or a per- 
sonal computer. 

fust because a course offers 
podcasts does not mean K-State 
will start requiring them in the fu- 
ture, Finkeldei said. Students will 
have the option to access pod- 
casts and listen to them on their 
computers. 

Some universities are veering 
away from calling the recordings 
podcasts because of recent threats 



by Apple that the company owns 
the name and also to clarify that 
an iPod is not needed to access 
them, Finkeldei said, 

"We also discussed calling them 
Cat Casts, but at the moment we 
are still calling them podcasts," 
Finkeldei said. 

Podcasts have an important 
role in education because they 
are another way to help students 
learn, said Beth Unger, vice pro- 
vost for academic services. 

"Our goal is to provide an en- 
vironment where our students 
can learn in a way that is easiest 
for them," she said. "We have pro- 
vided mechanisms for students to 
prepare for class, in many cases 
preview what the lecture is going 
to be and then review what the 
professor said so the need to take 



copious notes is diminishing." 

Bradley Matlack, senior in me- 
chanical engineering, goes online 
once a week to take notes from a 
video lecture his professor puts on 
the Internet for his aerodynamics 
class. 

Matlack said his instructor, 
Terry Beck, lectures in front of 
a video camera and writes notes 
that are shown along with the 
lecture. The lectures, are option*! 
to students in the class, and give 
them more insight on theif 'home- 
work, Matlack said. 

"1 think it's just more conve- 
nient," he said, "Once people start 
u»ing it more widely it can either 
be if you need extra help you can 
go in and see the instructor per- 

SeeVIKOPaatS 



Senator Sam Brownback considers presidential campaign 



By Mike Kelly 
KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

As the dust from the 2006 mid- 
term elections begins to settle, politi- 
cal analysts are beginning to ponder 
the next event that will shape the 
United States' political make-up: the 
2008 presidential election. 

Although the election is more than 
23 months away, candidates for the 
nation's highest office already have 
begun or will begin their campaigns 
sometime in the next two months. 
One candidate who has been on the 
presidential radar is none other than 
K-Slale alumnus Sen. Sam Brown- 
back, K- Kan. 

"1 think there is room, on the Re- 
publican side, for somebody that's a 



Republican candidate foe 2008 presktentiainoniinatwn: 

Sen. John McCain Ariz. 

iMLMiafe.fe 

TtHdyOuMMl-NY 

Mewt Gingrich -former Speaker of the House 

Gov. Mht Reran*? - Mass. 

Rep. Duncan Hunter Calif. 




full-scale conservative, that's an eco- 
nomic and fiscal and social conser- 
vative," Brownback told ABC's "This 
Week" television program Sunday. 

Brownback, who replaced Bob 
Dole as Kansas's senator in 1996, has 
been a staunch supporter of social 
conservatism during his two terms 

A former student body president 
at K State, he is a vocal opponent of 
abortion rights and embryonic stem 



cell research, having received a 100- 
percent ranking on his voting record 
from the National Right to Life Com- 
mittee. Brownback supports Second 
Amendment rights, receiving acco- 
lades from the National Rifle Asso- 
ciation. 

"The young congressman from 
Kansas has championed the cause 
of social conservatism in the upper 
body of the congress," said Doug Pat- 



ton, political analyst for news service 
The Conservative Voice. "This has 
made him a hero among so-called 
values voters, who find precious few 
senators from either party willing to 
fight for their issues " 

If Brownback does choose to 
throw his hat into the presidential 
ring, he will face tough opposition 
from within his own party He would 
join a potential Republican field in- 
cluding Sen. John McCain, K Ariz , 
Gov. Mitt Romney, R Mass.; former 
New York mayor Rudy Giuliani; 
former Speaker of the House Newt 
Gingrich; and Rep. Duncan Hunter, 
R-Calif 

"Brownback has the same prob- 
lem as any senator or congressman: 
a lack of executive experience," said 



Edward Morrissey of Captain's Quar- 
ters, a well-known political blog ring. 
"Legislators reach compromises, and 
those come back to haunt candidates 
on the presidential trail. On the oth- 
er hand, Brownback doesn't appear 
to have too many of these waffling 
points on the resume." 

One potential problem for Brown- 
back might be the media attention 
garnered by his Republican oppo- 
nents. McCain, Gingrich and Giu 
liani all have received front-page 
attention from sources ranging from 
the New York Times to CNf< while 
Brownback has been relatively quiet, 
waiting in the shadows. 

Asked why he has not officially 

See BROWNBACK Pag* 5 



Wichita State student performs 1-man play 



By Jonas Hogg 

KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

A group of about 15 people gath- 
ered in the K-State Student Union's 
Little Theatre for "The Night Larry 
Kramer Kissed Me." 

The Obie Award-winning solo 
play was presented 8 p.m. Tuesday 
to a group of about 30 people from 
K- Stale's Queer Straight Alliance 
(QSA) and Sexual Health Aware- 
ness Peer Educator's (SHAPE). 

"The Night Larry Kramer Kissed 
Me" is a colorful adaptation of au- 
thor David Drake's coming of age as 
a gay man: from cheerful recollec- 
tions of a 6 year old infatuated with 



"West Side Story" to his first male 
kiss, an event which was crushed by 
his father, to touching recollections 
of friends and loved ones who died 
from complications of HIV/AIDS. 

Wichita State University student 
Brad Thomison was the sole actor 
in the performance, which placed 
the unnamed character in the back- 
drop of historical events, from then- 
President Ronald Reagan's refusal 
to mention AIDS to the Thousand 
Points of Light, a demonstration 
aimed at bringing awareness to the 
disease in the early 1990s. 

Couched within the play is raw 
language, which Thomison said was 
part of the writer's original intent 



- shocking people into paying at- 
tention. 

"Part of this piece of work is to 
inspire conversation and action," he 
said. "This play is really in your face 
and really raw because nothing else 
was being done." 

Since the play's off- Broadway 
release in 1993, the winds of so- 
cial change have moved AIDS into 
the national spotlight, but with im- 
provements in treatment leading to 
increased life span and quality of 
life for those HIV positive, some ex- 
pressed concern that attention and 
funding have been diverted away 

See AWARENESS Page 5 




Chrtftopher Hancwtnckat | COLLEGIAN 
Brad Thomison, musk education student at WkhrU State, acts out a monologue 
titled The Night Larry Kramer Kissed Me* during his one-man performance Tuesday. 




Today's forecast 

AM snow showers/wind 
High: 39 Low: 16 



INSIDE 

Becoming one with your Wli 

It's not too often a video game can give you i car- 
diovascular workout. But Nintendo's new system, 
the Wit, does Just that, exercising more than just 
your thumbs. Sec story Page 6 



CAMPUS NEWS HIGHLIGHTS 



Book sate 

Today is the last day for the 
Holiday Bazaar at Hale Library. The 
bazaar offers books, compact discs 
and holiday items. Proceeds from 
the bazaar will benefit Libraries 
through Friends projects With 
the money, they an purchase the 
Page family Collection, which Is a 
series of diaries, letters and other 
papers from Frontier Kansas. 



Distinguished lecturer 

Steven Lacy, president ami CEO of 
Meredith Corporation will speak 
at 10:10 a.m. today in McCain 
Auditorium. Meredith Publica- 
tions includes "Better Homes and 
Gardens,"Ladies' Home Journal," 
"family Clrcle,"Parcnts,"*Fitness' 
and "Country Home" 



World AIDS Week 

There will be a red string display 
on the quad between Waters Hall 
and Hale Library all day today. A 
display titled 'Lives are at Stake' 
will be Friday with a walk begin- 
ning at 4:45 p.m at Boko Plaza 
A closing gala and silent donation 
art exhibit will be from 6 to 9 p.m. 
Saturday in the main ballroom at 
the K-State Student Union. 



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Page 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2006 



tfaflin. Booh and tppL** 



1814 Cfaffln M. 
www.claftinbooks.com 



k 



(785J 776-377T 
Fax: (785J 776-1009 



Puzzles | Eugene Sheffer 



ACROSS 
1 In 

disrepair 
4 Columbo 
porlrayer 
8 Ante- 
lope's 
playmate 

12 Teensy 

13 Naslase 
oi tennis 

14Leltthe 
sofa 

15 Common 
MM 

16 Hanni- 
bal's 
troops 

18 Medica- 
tion, at 
times 

20 AAAfob 

21 "Play — It 
Lays" 

24 Cardiff 
tongue 
28 Style 

32 - -tat-tat 

33 Handy- 
man's 
abbr. 

34 Put 
on the 
line 

36 Drenched 

37 Expanded 
39 Ks 

position 
41 Toadies' 
replies 



43 Wield a 
blue 
pencil 

44 Spell- 
down 

46 Piece of 

Info 
SO Transistor 

M 

55 Concert 

56 Volcanic 
flow 

57 Slay 
away 
from 

58 Matter- 
horn, 
eg 

59 Lalher 

60 Hit the 
horn 

81 Caustic 
solution 

DOWN 

1 Still 
unpaid 



2 Groucho- 
like look 

3 Erie's 
style 

4 Cancun 
celebra- 
tions 

5 The 
whole 
shooting 
match 

6 Big lib 

7 Retained 
6 Chest 

compo- 
nent 
9 Many 
millennia 

10 Superla 
live 
ending 

11 In 
medtas — 

17 "Please 
explain" 
1» Glutton 
22 Initial chip 



Solution lime: 


21 mini 


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CRYITOQUP 



8 U O T S U L! V EH 

DPCQH/S DHDK R U V R K I V 

DKTTMI, HR KTMJI RH O T 

E IJC'LYQTR 1YHTZRHJR, 
Ye*lerrfay's Cr* P i«quip: WHEN AN ORE 
DIGGER PLUGS SOME APPLIANCE INTO AN 
OUTLET. WILL HE USE A MINER CORD.' 
Today's Crypt oqmp Clue R equals T 



ON THE WEB 

The version of the Collegian that doesn't leave ink on your fingers 

Your picks for Photo of the Week 




Don't forget to vote for this week's 
photos at www.kstateiotlegian.com. 



ByDonnieJay 



90 d 

~t f ittNK 1 Sfct 

W*6's Skill/ 

I 



ffyY fcofMimt 

I 




The blotter | Arrests in Riley County on line at www.kstatecollegion.com. 



The planner 

Campus bulletin board 

The planner is the Collegians campus 
bulletin board service, hems in the 
calendar can be published up to three 
times. Items might not appear because 
of space constraints but are guaranteed 
to appear or the day of the activity, to 
place an Hem In the Campus Calendar, 
stop by Kedzie 1 16 and fill out a form 
ot e-mail the news editor at collegium 
ipub.ksu.edu by 11 a.m. two days before 
rtistorun. 

■ The Graduate School announces the 
final oral defense of the doctoral disserts 
non of Chanrtmote Detvisitsakun at 9 am 
today in Adiert 324 

■ Business Study Abroad Advocates 
wM meet at 4:30 p.m. today in Calvin 21 » 
for an end of semester social. 

■ An AIDS Awareness Week informa- 
tion tabie and What's Your SignrT-shrt 
sales will be in the K-State Student Union 
1 1 a.m. to 1 pm today and Thursday. 

■ Sign up this week for intramural 
j -point shootout by 5 pm. Thursday. 
Individuals or4-persoo teams may enter, 
The cost is SI per person phis lax. Competi- 
tkm will take place Saturday and Sunday at 
assigned times. For more information, visit 
www.mservkesltsu.edu^m*if(i or call 
{785)532-6980 

■ AIDS Walk 2006 will begin at 4:45 
p.m. Friday in Bosco Student Plaza. The 
walk will end a! Vamey s Book Store in 
Aggievilte. 

■ The Graduate School announces the 
final oral defense of the doctoral disserta- 
tion of Peng Lu at 2 p.m. Friday in Durland 
1029. 

■ The Graduate School announces 
the final oral defense of the doctoral dis- 
sertation of Jianbin Yu at 2 pm Tuesday in 
Throdtmorton 2002. 

■ The KSU Save Oarfur Team is col 
leering new and used youth and chDdrens 
clothing, personal care items like toothpaste 
and soap, and school supplies for Oarfur 
refugees in Sudan, Africa. Donations will 

be accepted in a collection box in the Union 
Courtyard until Dec 15. 



Corrections and 
clarifications 

Corrections and clarifications run tn this 
space. If you see something that shouM bt 
corrected call news editor teann Sutert at 
(785)532-6556 or e-mail ankgtan&pub. 

butt 
Kansas State Collegian 

(USPS 291 020) The Kansas State Collegian, 
a student newspaper at Kansas State Uni- 
versity, is published by Student Pubkatjons 
Inc., Kedzie 103, Manhattan. KS 66506. The 
Collegian is published weekdays during 
the school year and on Wednesdays during 
the summer. Periodica! postage is paid at 
Manhattan. KS 66502. POSTMASTER Send 
address changes to Kansas State Collegian, 
circulation desk, Kedzie 103, Manhattan, KS 
66506-7167. 
6 Kansas State Collegjaa 2006 




BOTTLES 



f SATURDAY- DEC. &ND 
r? ROOERCREAOER 



ATTENTION 
SENIORS 

Watch f »r the 2©«6 
SENIOR SURVEY, 
via small. Complete 
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eligible fer FAB4»L©«>S prizes, 
demited t>M Va meg's Beekstere. 
- K-State Office of Assessment 



ifJEltf 




§» TUBBY ' S 




any pint & wells 
uv blue bombs 

flavored long islands, 
carbombs & summer beer 



( 'hlnese ReUuuratM ami Mowoluin IUUJ 



Newly Renovated 



Department of Economics 
Kansas State University 



$ loff 



All You Can Eat 

Buffet & 
Mongolian BBQ 

Aiihvdhd KSL 1 ttudrnllO 



^ z) 




Joe Tiao Lecture On Economic Issues 



FREE 

(Local IJeliver 
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Mopypliafl BBJ ii Town 

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. 539-0888 • 539-8888 



Ml rW Ulfflfrfltf J W «lrh >lPi| Hth* i 



The Office of Student Activities and Services offers 



Free Consumer & Tenant Advice 



The Consumer and Tenant Affairs Office 
provides information on landlord/tenant 
rights and responsibilities and ads in the 
resolution of consumer complaints 
regarding products and/or services 
Brochures regarding landlord/tenant and 
consumer issues are also available 







Consumer and Tenant Affairs Office 

Appointments Available Daily 
Cat 532-6541 to make an appointment 




the 

provost's lectin 

series 

21)06-2007 



I 



10:30 am- 12:00 pm 
Thursday, November 30 
Hemisphere Room 
5 th Floor, Hale Library 



Chaos Breeds Life: Imperatives Defining 

the Future Relevance and Impact of 

the Academic Research Library 



Dr. James Neal 

Vice President for Information Technology & University Librarian 
Columbia University 

Hosted by 

Provost M. Duane Nellis 

Presentations followed by Q & A 

For more tntormalion, visit (he Pro wist s web site 

<http.//www Ksu edu^rovcwtyacademic/leclure/iraJex hlm> 

Students Welcome 



Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2006 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 3 



Library offers book sale, 
treats at holiday bazaar 



6y Megan Molttor 
KANSAS STATE COUEGIAN 

Students can do more than 
check out books in the library 
Through this afternoon, they 
also can purchase them 

The Friends of the KSU 
Libraries's holiday bazaar ends 
today It takes place on the sec- 
ond floor of Hale Library and 
offers more than just books. 
The tables are filled with items 
like jewelry, ornaments, cook- 
ies and other novelties. 

"We've been having our hol- 
iday bazaar for about ten years 
now," said Karen McCulloh, as- 
sistant to the dean at Hale. "We 



have better books and gifts here 
than we do at our larger book 
sales." 

McCulloh said everything 
they have was donated, and 
they do not use any library 
books. They also have people 
who make items to be sold. 

"One of our most interest 
ing items is a cow costume for 
a dog," she said. "I'm amazed it 
hasn't sold yet" 

She said the turnout has 
been good so far, and the sale 
has made close to $2,000 

Many people came to take 
advantage of the sale, and not 
all were students, 

"I'm a librarian, so I'm very 



interested in books, which is 
why 1 am here," said Mohan 
Ram as wa my, assistant profes- 
sor at Hale Library. "I came 
to look for Christmas presents. 
1 also liked the cookies, but 
decided not to buy (hem, al- 
though they would be good to 
give lo people." 

Ramaswamy said he was 
looking specifically for chil- 
dren's books. 

"That's what Christmas is all 
about, giving presents to kids," 
he said. 

Others just came to browse 
and sec what the sale offered. 

"I haven't ever been here 
before, so I'm not really look- 




Chrlitopher HaiMwtnckal | COLIEGIAN 
Yuan Wvtfan, freshman In kinesiology, looks through a rack of used paperback books during Hale Library's 
used book sale Tuesday, The sale continues today. 



ing for anything in particular," 
Phil Kocher, senior in graphic 



design, said. "1 really don't 
know what it's all about, but 



from what I can see, they have 
a little bit of everything." 



Dancers perform in the spotlight 



Laics® Bud ® Lifetime 

• ngagements and waddings 



By Josh Rouse 

MWAS STATE C0UE6IAN 

The stage ol Nichols Theatre 
was alight with talent last night 
as 67 dancers tapped, turned 
and twisted to music from the 
past and present 

Prom the early sounds of 
jazz and the '80s pop of Mi- 
chael Jackson and Prince to the 
modem day, hip-hop beats of 
the Ying Yang Twins and Justin 
Timberlakc dancers moved to 
the rhythms of an entire centu 
ry's worth of music. Donations 
also were taken in the forms of 
food and money to go to the 
Flinthills Breadbasket and the 
K State Dance Foundation 

"It wasn't too hard to cho- 
reograph," Jenny Bos well, soph- 
omore in open option, said. 
'We had class time to do it two 
weeks before the break." 

The dancers choreographed 
their dance moves, and some got 
class credit for routines Angela 
Hubler, director of the women's 
studies program, gave credit for 
student Saylor Ann Burgess' 




Everyone's doing it. 



rour rntt**ton>, vt»H K.<Jjl» to] to «tv«rtl». call S3I4MO 



776 3771 



if Textbook Buy back 
In Progress Now! 

X_l<lflift Jfamfo and Co/)i«i 



Catrlna Rawson | COLLEGIAN 
K State student dancers perform during the Student Spotlight 
Tuesday evening at Nichols Theatre. The performances are choreo- 
graphed and performed by students. 



choreography about domestic 
violence against women. 

"Because women's studies is 
an interdisciplinary program, we 
have students who do a variety 
of different things from theatre 
to dance to art to history and 
English," Hubler said. "Any of 
those, from a feminist perspec- 
tive, can be women's studies" 

Burgess is a senior in dance 
and women's studies. The rou- 
tine, Freedom Behind Ban, was 



described in the program as an 
emotional journey into the real- 
ity of domestic violence. It tells 
the story of women who were 
imprisoned for killing their as- 
sailants, yet said they felt more 
free behind bars than under the 
tyranny of the violence, 

"The best part is that people 
leave maybe being touched by 
that piece and learning some- 
thing and being more aware of 
domestic violence." she said. 



The Office of Student Activities and Services offers 



FREE LEGAL SERVICES FOR STUDENTS 



Student Legal Services Attorney 

SARAH BARR 

785-532-6541 

Call now for an appointment 




19 itwi ku Mimas*)*' t+ 



Mi 
Monday - Friday 

9:00- 11 :00 am 41:00 4 00 pm 



$700 \ 





World AIDS Day 

December 1st 

Events for the week. 

November 27 - 30: 

AIDS information table sponsored by 
SHAPE and Lafene Health Center 
"What's Your Sign?" t-shirts for $10 
K-State Union, 1 1 :00 am - 1 :00 pm 
Nov. 27 - Courtyard 
Nov. 28, 29 & 30 - Food Court 

December 1: 

- AIDS Walk - Bosco Plaza at 4:45 pm, 

Ends at Varney's. No fee. Hot chocolate and cookies 
(Thanks to Vamey's, Bluestem Bistro & Planet Sub.) 
• Quilt piece dedicated for the AIDS Memorial Quilt. 

December 2: 

- Art AID - Art auction in Union Ballroom, 6 - 9 pm 

Call Health Promotion, 785.532.6595, for more info or check 
website: www k-state edu/lafene/SHAPE/AI DSdayOo htm 




provided 



the 




THE K-STATE CONCERT BAND 
AND SYMPHONY BAND 

IN CONCERT 

November 29, 2006 

McCain Auditorium 

7:30 pm 

Dr. Frank Traci, Conductor 

Dr. Anthony Pursell, Conductor 

Darren Brooks, Graduate Conductor 

With Special Guests: 

Rob Smith - Composer and Conductor 

CW2 Scott MacDonald - Conductor of the Big Red One Division Band 

Dr. Paul Hunt - Trombone Soloist 

• All KSU Band concerts are free to the public * 



# 



DCMATMIHT OF 



MUSIC 

iMM State •WtHwstttf 



AGRICULTURE 

Daniel C. Anderes 
Dane Allen Anspaugh 
Melissa Jeanne Bigham 
Patricia Lynne Black 
Lillian Frances Brzostowski 
Beth Ellen Gillett 
Tina Krafft 
Michael W Popelka 
Jason E Topp 
Zane W. Unrau 
Jenna Beth Wall 

ARCHITECTURE PLANNING 
AND DESIGN 

Clemente Jaquez-Herrera 

ARTS A SCIENCES 

Casey L Anderson 

Erin Bachman 

Catherine Anne Bell 

Holly Bergman 

Erinn M. Bock 

Morgan Bonds 

Lisa J. Bruna 

Kristen Rose Burgmeier 

Scott Randall Chew 

Angela Rose Connell 

Adrianne OeWeese 

Ann Frances Draemel 

Megan Jean Draper 

Danielle Marie English 

Stephanie Faulk 

Rebecca K Feil 

Mridu Gandhi 

Laura Jaclyn Grauer 

Kelly Jenae Hammond 

Jessica Paige Harrison 

Elizabeth Lynn Hill 

Jennifer L. Hill 

Elizabeth M. Holste 

Madison Gail Huber 

Micah L. Janzen 

Knsten Klutas 

Jay Kenneth Kramer 

Matthew Scott Kueker 

Renee R. Lackey 

KyleW Malone 

Jessica Lynn Martin 

Sarah Mattie 

Jocelyn E Mattoon 

Jacinda Ann Mein 

Jim Mosimann 

Jenna Marie Newsum 

Takahiro Ohira 

Matt Pierson 

Nicholas Adam Pool 

Joyce Mary Ray 

Asnleigh Nicole Reynolds 

Katherine R Ross 

Matthew Roman Schmidt 

Tristan C. Ta folia 

John Michael Tracy 

Mariya Beth Johanning Vaughan 

Phuonq M Vu 

Stacey Marie Yadon 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRAnON 

Lexie M. Bellamy 
Ashley Marie Gibbs 
Tsubasa Hiramoto 
Aubrey Anne Jacobscn 
Rachel D. Jones 



Phi Kappa Phi 

An Honor Society Across All Academic Areas 
Kansas State University Chapter 

Established Nov. 1 5, 1915 
Congratulations to our New Initiates! 



Patrick John Karcz 
Rena Nicole Keith 
Mallory G. Lovendge 
Stephanie McDowell 
Alissa Mane Millard 
Ashlee Ann Rickabaugh 
Joshua Richard Schumm 
Jennifer Dawn Spruce 
Alison Janei St Clair 

EDUCATION 

Amanda Laine Beast ey 
Veronica Sue Blajr 
LeAnn Ruth Manhart 
Andrea S Meli 
Jason Gerard Ostmeyer 
Kristin S Russell 
Jessica C. Stone 
Katie Lynn Strelcheck 
Dana M. Thompson 
Eryn E Wood 

ENGINEERING 

William Evan Asher 
Ryan Jacob Feldkamp 
Andrew P. Gorman 
Joseph Hacker 
Dustin T Hamman 
Samuel Henke 
Zachary P. Maier 
Justin J. Mai Ion 
Lisa Anne Mercurio 
Amanda Kay Roodhouse 
Nathan E. Spare 
Emily Anne Voigt 

HUMAN ECOLOGY 

Sarah Bishop 
Ann Patrice Butler 
Andrea C. Fontana 
Ragan Frederick 
Jill R FriUemeier 
Heather D Gartrell 
Oanita J. Griffey 
Michelle K. Higgtns 
Alison Marie Hover 
Whitney Nicole Lansdowne 
Heather Marie Markham 
Carolyn Lorraine McCullough 
Jenny Marie Meerpohl 
MelanieRenee Milter 
Ashley Elizabeth Mullins 
Danielle Mane Rew 
Amanda Kay Robinson 
Jamie L. Rood 
Joanna Louise Seley 
Carrie E Skopic 
Kathleen D Tomlinson 
Cassondra M White 
Lindsey Jo Wilson 

TECHNOLOGY and AVIATION 

Yuki Narita 

GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Garnett Arnold, Jr 
Jackson F Ayres 
Tara Baillargeon 
Lorena Barboza 
Patrick S Barton 
Jeffrey Charles Bergman 
Timotny Allen Bizoukas 
Dirk C Blackdeer 



Toni M Cerbo 

Laura E Christiansen 

Carl Eugene Colbert 

Brad Cunningham 

Fideleon O. Damian II 

Lori Ann DeBolt 

Joel Alan DiGirolamo 

Vicki E Gile 

Nicole W Goodman 

Melanie L, Hammond 

Jason Patrick Hohl 

Van Hutchinson 

Misti L Johnson 

Christopher Alex Scuka Kabriel 

Hyang Sook Kim 

Melissa Kay Kleindl 

Kevin Kugel 

Lotta C. Larson 

Andrew Lawson 

Annika Linde 

Joe Louis 

Sarang Madan Mairal 

Jennifer Lynne Malcolm 

Prabha Madhuwanthi Manuratne 

Angel M. Martinez 

Emily A. Mattingly 

B Jan Middendorf 

Jul i An Moore 

Lisa Moreno 

Jeffrey Wayne Morgan 

Kan L. Nap 

Stephen Q'Black 

Mona Michelle O'Neal 

Christopher Sean Ostrom 

Nicole Annette Overway 

Emily Katherine Peine 

Luba L Ramm 

Sara K. Rosenkranz 

Hanni Sarangapam 

Kimberlee K Shattuck 

Rebecca Lee Smith 

Lisa A Sobering 

Jonathan M Spikes 

Justin D Stowe 

Vicky Waller Surash 

Neelesh Thakur 

Teresa J Tonn 

Jenette Katherine Turpin 

Praveen Venkata Vadlani 

Kaleena Solis Viruete 

Sarah Marie Wearing 

Michael D Weltsch 

Shawn Michael Westmoreland 

Matthew James Williamson 

Brian! Willis 

Diane M Wilson 

J Jenny Yang 

VETERINARY MEDICINE 
Krista N. Adamovich 
Lauren M Calland 
Traci Lynn Elliott 
Chelsea M. Kunst 
i Dylan Lutte 
Michael D Marino 
Tara Brooke Miller 
Megan Christine Peterson 
Kabel Robbins 
Nicole Pratt Slater 
Melissa Lynn Worhach 



Chapter Scholarships and Recognitions: 



SOPHOMORE SCHOLARS RECOGNITION: 

AGRICULTURE: Rebecca Tokach, Kristen Schulte 
ARCHITECTURE, PLANNING AND DESIGN: Christina Murman 
ARTS AND SCIENCES' Shannon Connolly, Nathan Harms 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION: Stephanie Diabal, Patrick Amos 
EDUCATION: James Michael Stanfill, Jessica J Spare 
ENGINEERING: William Ludwig Bartel, Conner James Griffith 
HUMAN ECOLOGY Dana Celeste Aumick, Genna Mary Christine Gehrt 
TECHNOLOGY AND AVIATION. Janelle Nicole Baron 
VETERINARY MEDICINE: Seth Edwin Hartter 



UNDERGRADUATE 

SCHOLARSHIP 

RECIPIENTS: 

Kourtney Rae Bettinger 
Jeffrey E. Elkins 
Matthew David King, 
Ashley Nicole Phipps 
Lydia Marie Roberts 
Adrienne Nicole Stotwy 



' 



OPINION 



Page 4 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2006 



[Confederate flags 

Keep freedoms by debunking the arguments, promoting the practice of self-censorship 




ZACHARYT. 
ECKELS 



I've heard many arguments in 
support of the confederate flag in 
my lifetime. Some were among the 
stupidest ideas 
I've ever heard 
in my life, while 
the rest were only 
half-truths among 
whole lies 
The strongest ar- 
gument in support 
of the stars and 
bars was that the 
Civil War really 
had nothing to do 
with slavery before its end It can 
even be argued one of America's 
most revered Republicans, Abraham 
Lincoln, had no intention of freeing 
the slaves in the 1863 Emancipa- 
tion Proclamation. 

In his book "Forced Into Glory: 
Abraham Lincoln's White Dream," 
Lerone Bennett argues the procla- 
mation is carefully worded to only 
free slaves in the rebel Southern 
states. 

The problem is, these states were 
not under Union control at this 
time, and therefore the proclama- 
tion freed no one. 

However, the person who feeds 
you this argument, appearing to un- 
derstand and care about race-related 
issues, fails to recognize one key 
point. Even if Lincoln didn't intend 
to attach slavery to the Civil War. 
today's Americans do. 

Therefore, presenting it still ap- 
pears racist 

The other arguments, at least the 
ones worth mentioning, all seem to 




defend the personal use of the rebel 
flag We've all heard people argue 
them before, trying just as hard to 
convince themselves as they are try- 
ing to convince you. 

"It's patriotic to remember his- 
tory," they say, or, "it's good to rebel 
against authority," usually followed 
by some random quote from a Revo- 
lutionary War figure. Oh, and my 
favorite, "But I actually believe in a 
confederacy for our government" 



Let me debunk these three argu- 
ments in order. 

One: people will remember the 
brutal history of the Civil War with 
or without that damn flag. It was by 
far the deadliest war in our young 
nation's history and should only be 
remembered with the respect such a 
war deserves 

Two: while our founding fathers, 
being the slave -owning racists they 
were, probably would agree with the 



muitrattont by Jordan Miietl | COLLEGIAN 



rebel spirit of the South, it does not 
mean we should use their quotes in 
that manner. 

We've progressed rapidly through- 
out the past 200 years, but we're 
nowhere near where we could be. 
During this progression, we've begun 
to translate the words of these men 
in more significant ways. 

Expanding the use of the term 
"men" to all races and sexes is slowly 
moving us away from our history of 



denying rights to a brighter future of 
supplying them to all. 

Along with this progression, we 
have come to shun physical vio- 
lence Well, unorganized violence at 
least. We've replaced bloody wars 
over trivial issues with peaceful pro 
tests and a stronger democracy The 
idea of being a happy-go-lucky rebel 
excited for bloodshed belongs in the 
past. 

Third: If you really believe in a 
confederacy, there are other ways to 
show it. Simple phrases like "Kan 
san first, American second"' (with- 
out the flag, of course) would be a 
clearer way to get your point across. 

In the end, we're lucky to live in 
a country that allows such freedom 
of speech. The idea of Nazism is so 
horrible that Germany has forbid 
den the production of pro-Nazi 
materials 

Fighting ideas in such ways only 
gives them credit they don't deserve 

It's better to allow them to exist, 
while educating the masses to prove 
them wrong and explaining why 
they are so horrid. 

In the United States, the confeder- 
ate flag is a symbol of an idea nearly 
as horrible as the Holocaust. 

While we thankfully didn't go 
as far as genocide, we still took the 
freedoms and erased the history of 
an incredible number of people 

There is no reason to support such 
a horrible thing. 



Zaditry T. Eckels is • senior in print journalism. 
PImm Mod comment) to opiiwerM'tpirt Jrsu.edu. 



Plastic surgery, fashionable trend gives new lengths to perfection 




MEGAN 
MOLITOR 



Extreme perfectionists, take 
note. Just when you thought you 
had fixed every horrendous flaw on 
your body, a new 
one comes skipping 
down the block, 
ready to point 
and laugh at your 
hideous imperfec- 
tion. The other day, 
1 stumbled upon 
a report stating 
one of the United 
States' fast est- grow- 
ing plastic surgery 
procedures is eyelash transplant 
surgery. 

While reading this, my forehead 
wrinkled in confusion. We all have 
things we don't like about our- 
selves, but it must take some sincere 
self-loathing to be that picky 

According to the report by 
MSNBC, the procedure originally 
was developed to help burn victims. 
However (and I'm assuming a little 
bit here), after these victims raved 
about their fabulous new pillow-like 
lashes, unburned Americans quickly 
jumped on the bandwagon. 

The procedure is relatively 



simple The doctor takes hair fol- 
licles from the hairs on your head 
and transplants them onto your 
eyelid. If it ended there. 1 might be 
tempted to chalk it up to something 
else to roll my eyes about, but no. 
The best part: the side effects 

Since the new lashes are just 
regular old hair, they grow like hair. 
That's right, they grow A lot. You 
have constantly have to trim them 
or else run the risk of buying extra 
shampoo for your lashes. Also, 
since hair normally grows down, 
good old gravity pulls your new 
lashes down, too It would be wise 
to invest in a quality eyelash curler 

Without proper maintenance, 
you could end up looking like 
Cousin It from the eyelashes down 
All this to be able to seductively bat 
your eyes? I have enough to worry 
about in the mornings without bat- 
tling an eyelash fro 

I'm all for doing whatever it 
takes to raise your self-esteem. If 
this means going up a couple cup 
sizes or sucking a few Big Macs out 
of you, then more power to you. 
But for the life of me, I can't imag- 
ine getting personal satisfaction 



out of looking in the mirror and 
thinking, "Wow, my eyelashes look 
especially voluptuous today." 

What will you gain from this? 
Money? Fame? Saturday evenings 
filled with love -struck suitors? The 
only advantage I can think of is 
saving a little bit on mascara 

It just seems so frivolous 
Maybe that's indicative of what 
mainstream society has become: 
so caught up in our own lives and 
petty problems, we're forced to turn 
to things like eyelash transplant 
surgery just to avoid worrying about 
the bigger picture. 

Perhaps it's easier to focus on 
what we can do to improve our- 
selves rather than put forth the 
effort to make a difference in some- 
thing meaningful 

It's not like we're not urged in 
this direction. Look at all the plastic 
surgery related shows on TV. "Nip/ 
Tuck," "Dr. 90210" - all programs 
like that do is promote the thought 
that something is wrong with all of 
us. If you can't think of anything, 
then obviously you haven't taken a 
hard look in the mirror lately. 

It sounds like a horrible excuse 



for turning down a date 
"Sorry, I can't go out 

with you tonight, 1 have 

to transplant some 

lashes." 

Laughable or 

not, I think it is 

a frightening 

eye-opener of 

the lengths 

society 

can reach 

to avoid 

dealing 

with larg- 
er issues 

If thinking 

about this 

makes the 

hair on your 

arms stand on 

end, worry not 

Just transplant 

them to your chin 

- I hear that will be 

hot next season 



Meg in Molitor It ■ sophomore in mass commu 
nitations. Please send commend to opinion* 
spvb.kui.t4u. 




- /—H ft N S A S STATE 

Collegian 



Emily LtwrwK* | Huron m cwti 

Amy Fltdwr | M»N«N(, ED1T0M 

iMMfMkM I MWlfOiUM 

Abby Brownbocfc | (W r (Hill 

M*9*ft Mom* I CiTT.COV EDITOR 

Nriiton Roderick | (JWruSIDUO* 

Anthony Mindou | SPOUTS I WW 

ftniwMt Lawlm | IHHDGf [NTM 

Ow*n K*nn*dy | OPINION ItMTOJ 

Z*ch*ryT. Ecktli | WfSfNTAM* ItHIM 

S«»wnDo*l| WOTO(W'0( 

Roytf Mtyn»> | ONiINF IfJIIflt 

Loo»n C. Ad.mt | CUB I If EDITOR 

KX«y Wlllumi | MMMUH 

Oourtixy Slfypwi | «SI AD MM1U li 



WRITE TO US 

The Collegian welcomes your letters to the editor. 
They can be submitted by e mail to knenaspiib 
kiu.tdu, or in person to Kedzie 116. Please include 
your full name, year in school and major. Letters 
should be limited to 250 words. All submitted 
letters may be edited for length and clarity 



CONTACT US 

Kansas State Collegian 
103 Manhattan, KS 66 $02 

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Classified ads. ..(785) 5)2-6555 

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TA TUC PHI NT I * n M " tor ' a< selected and debated by the editorial board and written after a majority 
I U I F1L I Ulll I | opinion is formed. This is the Collegian's official opinion. 

Wii game system encourages students 
to exercise instead of just vegging out 



It's indisputable today's 
children are more obese than 
older generations Some 
speculate modern technology 
is to blame, including video- 
gaming systems. 

It's important for children 
to be active and spend hours 
outside riding bikes or partic- 
ipating in role-playing games. 
However, today's children 
spend all their time indoors 
plopped in front of a televi- 
sion set watching cartoons or 



playing video games. 

Nintendo seems to want to 
change this. With the Ninten- 
do Wii, children are forced to 
exercise a bit while enjoying 
their video games. Plus, the 
Wii attracts users because its 
controllers are shaped like a 
TV remote and a nunchuck. 

The Wii is a step forward 
in video gaming. We applaud 
Nintendo for making a gam- 
ing system that incorporates 
a bit of exercise. While it 



doesn't replace the exercise 
children get from playing 
outside, it does encourage 
them to be less lazy. 

The Wii is good for older 
players, too. It makes video 
games more physically 
interactive and gives users 
something to do instead of 
aimlessly staring at the televi 
sion 

Check out the Nintendo 
Wii; it just might be good for 
your health. 



CAMPUS F0URUM 

395-4444 or- 

fourum@spub.ksu.edu 

The Campus Fourum is the Collegian's anonymous 
call-in system The Fourum is edited to eliminate 
vulgar, racist, obscene and libelous comments. 
The comments are not the opinion of the Col- 
legian nor are they endorsed by the editorial staff 

Old you guys know its fat season? Yeah. 

I just went to a concert at Ail Faiths Chapel, and 
there was no musk. It kinda sucks. 

Katie, I'm breaking up with you. 

The trow Is the official county bird of Johnson 
County. 



This is the entire Fourum for today. Pleas* 
thedr tomorrow's Collegian for new comments. 



Wednesday, Nov. 28, 2006 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 5 



VIDEO | Professors say podcast 
paralles in-classroom participation 



Continued from Page 1 

sunnily or for those that don't 
you can go online and do it at 
your own speed" 

In the College of Business 
Administration, assistant pro- 
fessor Michael Chilton uses 
podcasts in his course Applica- 
tions of Data Models in Bust 
ness. However, not all students 
are excited by the ability to lis- 
ten or view lectures online. 

"Why would you go to the 
lecture twice?" )oe Olerich, 
senior in management infor 
mation systems, said "It's dou- 
bling the work." 

Mat lack said he felt similar 
lo Olerich. 

"If I were to watch one of 
the lectures online and just un- 
derstand it completely I prob 



ably would then skip class be- 
cause there is no point in going 
twice," Mat lack said 

While some worry students 
will be less likely to attend class 
if they can receive all of their 
information online, Unger said 
the opposite is true. 

"It turns out that using this, 
the students actually attend 
class more," she said "One of 
the things is they know they 
don't have to scribble notes." 

Unger said professors at 
other universities report stu- 
dents who are in courses with 
podcasts are more involved in 
class discussions. 

"1 think you develop a bet 
ter relationship with your pro- 
fessor this way and it allows 
you that chance to do that," she 
said. 



BROWNBACK | Candidacy for 
presidency not confirmed nor denied 



Continued from Page I 

announced or denied his can- 
didacy, Brownback said, "My 
witc and I and our family have 
spent a lot of time thinking 
about this, praying about it, 
and really considering wheth- 
er we could bring a message 
to the country that needs to be 
discussed." 

Although the senator did not 
have an official announcement 
lor the Collegian, Brownback 
told "This Week," "We're very 
close with announcements." 

Recent actions from the 



senator suggest a presidential 
run is likely In past months, 
Brownback has made several 
trips to Iowa, New Hampshire 
and other states, holding early 
caucuses or primary elections 
On "This Week," moderator 
George Stephanopoulos joked 
that Brownback already should 
be considered a presidential 
candidate. 

"Well. I can tell from that 
smile that "you're in,"" Stepha- 
nopoulos said. "That's not very 
coy at all" 

Brownback simply stated, 
"We'll see" 



AWARENESS | Performance part of K-State's first World AIDS Week 



Continued from Page 1 

from treatment and vac- 
cine research. 

The final segment of 
the play puts Thomson's 
character in the year 
2018, reminiscing on a 
long and apparently vio- 
lent fight between fac- 
tions disagreeing about 
the rights of homosexuals 
involving gay marriage, 
adoption and hate-crime 
legislation 

"Get prepared. It won't 
be pretty, but it's good 
here, you'll see," Thomi- 
son's character said. 

Tuesday night's perfor- 
mance is part of a week- 
long series of events de- 
signed to bring awareness 
to K State's first collabor- 
ative world AIDS week, 
said Josh Keed, sopho- 
more in food science. 

Reed, who has lived 
his entire life in Manhat- 
tan, said many people 
consider themselves in- 
sulated from HIV and 
AIDS, but when a friend 
and mentor was recently 
diagnosed, the reality of 
the situation hit home. 

"If one person in a 
community like this has 
AIDS it effects every- 
body," he said. 

As part of the week- 



long events, today partic- 
ipants will run red string 
between the lamp posts in 
the area between Waters 
Hall and Hale Library as 
an interactive display on 
HIV's community effect. 
Reed said. 

Thursday's Acting on 
AIDS in Bosch Student 
Plaza will shift focus to 
children in Africa, either 
orphaned by or suffering 
fromHIV/AlDS. 

lasuii Dockins. presi- 
dent of QSA, said the 
event is more about rais- 
ing awareness and funds, 
and people are encour- 
aged to "adopt" an or 
phan and keep him or her 
in their thoughts 

An AIDS walk will 
begin at 4:45 p.m. Friday 
at Bo5CO Student Plaza, 
ending with a vigil and a 
donation to the national 
AIDS quilt, and the final 
event. Artists for AIDS 
Awareness will be held at 
6 p.m. Saturday in the K- 
State Student Union Ball 
room 

"To have something 
that's really raw and edgy 
brought to a place like 
this - I think the shock 
value itself can be an in 
credible instructor," Reed 
said 





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Sum. laUniiMipikalkw. 





a 776-5577^ 

Purple Pig 



25 Pitchers 

| Every Wednesday 

KSU vs. Calil«>rn 

Watch it here! • 9:30 Tipof I 



Kansas $tate £hoirs and K ansas S tate D e P art 5 en \ f,Mj! s ' c -^ 
^ Presents \^$/rt 



Featuring: 

The Kansas State Choir & Chorale 

Rod Walker, Director 

William Wingfield, Piano 

Janie Anthony. Student Accompanist 

The KSU Brass Ensemble 

Gary Mortenson & Paul Hunt, Directors 

Mary Ellen Sutton, Organ 




December 1 . 2006 
7:30 pm 

Admission is Free 



9 



OEPtRTMENT OF 



MUSIC 



First United Methodist Church 
(6' & Poyntz) 

For more information please 
contact Jay at (785) 532-3815 




Chrlftophar Hanawindwl (OulGiAN 
Brad Thorn I *on recites a monologue titled "Ode to the Village People Part I". 
"The Night Larry Kramer Kissed Me" is the longest- running solo show in New 
York theater history. 




Just let it out... 




at the Public Editor 



Logan C. Adams, Public Editor of the Collegian, 

will be available today in the K -State Student 

Union from 10am - 12pm 

to hear your thoughts. 

Until then, e-mul htm At publtiedirarVipub.ktu edu 




I 



- — ■ 



I 



Page 6 



SPORTS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2006 



Your health | Staying home 




MELISSA 



Commercial 
workouts 



A typical 30- minute televi- 
sion show includes 22 minutes of 
programming with six minutes of 
national adver- 
tising and two 
minutes of local 
ads This means 
a grand total of 
eight minutes 
^^r l of commercials 
I (although some 
half-hour blocks 
can have as much 
~ as 12 minutes of 
commercials). Each commercial's 
length averages 10 to 30 sec- 
onds, depending on the television 
station's purchase of advertising 
time. 

In other words, throughout the 
course of an evening, let's say about 
three programs or three hours, you 
could total a 48-minule workout 
when performing exercises for the 
16 minutes of advertising during 
each hour-long program 

Keep in mind that getting 30 
minutes of accumulated exercise 
is recommended by the American 
College of Sports Medicine for 
health benefits. 

So, here's a thought; instead of 
making excuses, try multi -tasking. 

Begin your workout with a 
warm-up during the introduction of 
your first program with some side 
to-sidc shuffle* across the room. 
This will elevate your heart, warm 
your muscles and prepare your 
body for movement. 

During the rest of the commer- 
cials you can use home equipment 
like exercise balls, dumbbells, bands 
or your body weight. 

Try these basic exercises for your 
commercial workouts: 

FOR STRENGTH 

■ Push-ups 

■ Sit-ups (on a ball or floor) 

■ Lunges 

■ Bicep curls 

■ Overhead Iriccp extensions 

FORCARDIO 

■ Stairs 

■ lump rope (if ceilings are high) 

■ Shuffles 

■ Squat jumps 

■ Moving lunges (around the room) 

You can vary the number of rep- 
etitions, exercise speed and number 
of sets to change intensity 

Be sure to have controlled 
movements with good posture: 
straight back, feet hip-width apart 
and knees slightly bent, with tight 
abdominal muscles, when perform- 
ing all exercises. 



Melissa Hauej is * senior in public health nutri 
tion Mid dietetic and a nutrition consultant 

ana MMflClA COUnu 091 UCfCBt UltltltO 

personal train*! it Peters Recreation Complex. 
Please send to mments to ipoc fi j ifxib.kui, tdu. 



Wii workout 





1-MINUTE 
DRILL 

Staff Reports 





Photo* by Stavtn Doll I COUtblAN 
Reporter Trent Scott, junior in nutrition and exercise science, uses the Nintendo Wii's wireless controller as he prepares to swing 

while playing the homerun derby part of the Wii sports game. 

The gaming system that will get you off the couch, in the action 

8y Trent Scott 

KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



By now you probably are used 
to me telling you to get off 
your butt and go to the gym. 
You're expecting me to tell you to eat 
right and be active I'd never condone 
wasting your life away by playing vid- 
eo games, right' 

Right - but with shades of gray. 

Now, don't get me wrong. 1 still 
hate the thought of people spending 
countless hours glued to their televi- 
sions or computers, and 1 can't be- 
lieve people would actually spend up 
to $10,000 on a Playstation 3. 

However, today I will go against 
all of my preconceived and usually 
justified notions about the relation- 
ship between video game playing and 
physical fitness. 

Two days ago I played Nintendo 
Wii for the first time, and 1 absolutely 
loved it. 

In case you haven't heard of it, 
the Nintendo Wii is a new gaming 
system that allows you to physically 
take part in the action via two wire- 
less controllers. One resembles a TV 
remote, while the other controller is a 
device Nintendo calls the Nunchuck 
I found both to be very easy to oper- 
ate 

lb use the remotes, you simply 
hold them in your hands and manip- 
ulate them as if they were the piece of 
equipment depicted in the game It's 
actually quite intuitive. 

Each Nintendo Wii comes with a 



Scott moves his controller while participating in the bowling challenge of the Wii 
sports game. The system uses two wireless, motion-sensitive controllers. 



Wii sports disc, so you can practice 
and play without having to spend an- 
other $50 on a game. 

The Wii sports disc offers five dif- 
ferent sports experiences including 
bowling, tennis, golf, baseball and 
boxing. I played every one except 
golf, and I found each of them to be 
quite enjoyable and challenging. 

My favorite activity was boxing, 
and the highlight of my bout was a 
knockout early in the second round. 

To box, you simply hold one 
controller in each hand and throw 
punches at your opponent as if you 
were hitting a punching bag. You can 
even dodge blows by moving side to 
side. 

It was a workout, too. I actually 
started to break a sweat. 

The Wii sports disc also allows you 



to calculate your Wii skill level. This 
entails bowling, a home run derby 
and a singles match in tennis. 

1 sadly had the Wii skill level of 
a 66 year old. 1 then tried to redeem 
myself, but failed after aging to a 
shameful 78 years. 

In any case. I found the Nintendo 
Wii to be an exciting new spin on the 
predictability that has become video 
gaming. It's fun, it's fit, and for $250, 
Nintendo Wii is by far the best bang 
for your buck and belt size of any 
gaming system on the market. 



Trent Scott is I junior in nutrition and excreta 
science and American Council on Exercise 
certified personal trainer at Peters Recreation 
Complex. Please send comments to sown •npub. 
km.tdu. 







l^l 


■ m 


*5 




MMr 


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*«jjt ' 






V 1 



Men's basketball team looks 
to improve record on the road 



Cttrlftophw HonowlncM | routGMH 
Senior Carrier Martin and the Wildcats travel west to take on 
California. K-State lost its last road game, 78-S4 against New Mexico. 



By Jonathan Garten 

KANSAS SUTKOIUGIAN 

The last time the K-State men's basket- 
ball (4-1) team went on the road, things got 

ugly 

The Wildcats will look for a stronger per- 
formance tonight at California, after losing 
on the road to New Mexico 78-54 on Nov. 
21 

"I'm looking forward to it," senior for- 
ward Carrier Martin said. 

"We hit a bump in the road in Albuquer- 
que, but I know we're a good team. We've 
been fighting through some mental mistakes, 
but I know we can go to Cal and be produc- 
tive" 

In its last road trip, K-State shot less than 
30 percent from the field against the Lobos, 
The Wildcats' luck wasn't much better from 
the free throw line, where ihey made eight of 
15 attempts. 

"We're going to have to play a whole lot 
better" coach Bob Huggins said. 

California has started the season with a 



5-1 record. The Golden Bears won the Great 
Alaska Shootout with a 78-70 win over 
Loyola Mary mount on Nov 25. 

California is led by freshman forward 
Ryan Anderson, who averages about 20 
points and more than 
eight rebounds a game 

In the Great Alaska 
Shootout championship 
game, Anderson scored 
15 points and hauled 
in 12 rebounds against 
Loyola Mary mount 

"I saw them on TV the 
other night." senior guard 
Lance Harris said "It's going to take a lot of 
heart to go out there and play hard." 

Huggins said he looks forward to play- 
ing tougher competition like California but 
would rather play them in Manhattan. 

"I'd just as soon play about five of them 
in a row at home," Huggins said "If we're 
going to be legitimately what we want to be, 
then you have to play those people and you 
have to figure out ways to win." 



K State at 
California 

When: Haas Pavil- 
ion, Berkeley, Calif. 
When: 9)0 tonight 
Radio/TV: K-Slate 
Sports Network/Fox 
Sports Met 



FBC | Campbell, Figurs named 
1st team All-Big 12 Conference 

K-State placed a total of 1 1 players on the 
2006 AT&T All-Big 12 football teams, confer 
ence offkiars announced Tuesday. Selections 
were made by the Big 12 coaches, who were 
not permitted to vote fw their own players 

Sophomore defensive end Ian Campbell 
and senior wide receiver /return specialist 
Yamon Figurs headlined the list of K-State 
honorees as first -team selections. Senior 
linebacker Brandon Archer and sophomore 
defensive bade Marcus Watts were named to 
the second team. 

Seven Wildcats also received honorable 
mention consideration, including senior 
linebacker Zach Diles, junior defensive end 
Rob Jackson, senior wide receiver Jermaine 
Moreira, freshman running back Leon fatten, 
senior place kicker Jeff Snodgrass. senior 
offensive lineman Greg Watford and senior 
defensive back Kyle Williams. 

The Big 1 2 s top tackier among defensive 
lineman with 60 stops, Campbell tied the K- 
State single-season record tor sacks with 1 1.5 
on the year and heads into the bowl season 
ranked fifth natjonalty in that category. He 
also led the Big 1 2 in tackles for tosses with 
16.5, a figure that ranks 19th in the country. 

Figurs, who was selected as the league's 
top return specialist, finished the season 
ranked second in the Big 12 and 16th nation- 
ally in punt returns after averaging 12.2 yards 
on 20 attempts. 

Archer, K-State's leading tackier fw the 
third straight season, ranked sixth in the Big 
12 during the tegular season with a career 
single-season best 97 tackles 

In just four starts. Watts collected 19 
tackles, including a pan of sacks and three 
interceptions. 



Associated Press 

FBC | Stoops unanimous choice for 
AP Big 1 2 Coach of the Year honors 

NORMAN, Okla — In a season of 
turmoil, Bob Stoops was snll able to mold a 
championship-caliber team at Oklahoma 

Even after the 
dismissal of their 
tuning quarterback 
and an injury to their 
record-setting running 
back, the Sooners 
managed to go 1 0-2, 
7-1 in the Big 12. It 
was good enough for 
Oklahoma to win its 
fifth Big 12 South Sloops 

title and a berth in the conference champion 
ship game Saturday — and, on Tuesday, 
Stoops was named The Associated Press Big 
12 coach of the year. 

Stoops was a unanimous choke for the 
honor, which he also won in 2000 and 2003. 
He becomes the first three-time winner In 
the conference's 1 1 year history. Only former 
Colorado coach Gary Bamett had also won 
twice Stoops is the second straight unani- 
mous selection, following Texas' Mack Brown. 



FBC | Peterson out for Saturday's 
Big 12 Championship game 

NORMAN, Okla. — No. 8 Oklahoma will 
be without star tailback Adrian Peterson when 
it faces No. 19 Nebraska in the Big 12 champi 
onship game Saturday. 

Peterson, the 2004 
Heisman runner-up, has 
missed six weeks after 
breaking his collarbone 
Oct 14 on a tout Mown 
run against Iowa Stale. 

'Adrian is not 
going to ptay,* Sooners 
coach Bob Stoops said 
Tuesday at his weekly 





Petarson 



news conference. "Without being too technical, 
he's dose. He could be deared to play, but each 
week that passes the likelihood of it recurring is 
less and less" 

Peterson, the nation's No. 2 rusher at the 
time of his injury, initially was expected to miss 

enr Wppkt 

OWahoma(10-2,7-1Bigl2lhaswon 
all six of its games without Peterson, who set 
an NCAA freshman record in 2004 with 1,925 
yards rushing. He had 935 yards and 10 toudv 
downs in six games (his season and is ISO 
yards shy of Oklahoma's career rushing record, 
held by 1978 Heisman trophy winner Billy 
Sims. 

He possibly could go fw that record in a 
bowl game. 

The bowl game is a very Iftety possibility 
and very My to happen," Sloops said. Talking 
to Adrian, he absolutely wants to play. And 
by that time, that's another four weeks of 
healing that they're really sure that he'll be fine 
and there's a really small chance of anythirw 
happening toil' 



I 



4 



CLASSIFIEDS 



To place an advertisement call 



Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2006 



II I I I I 
II 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 7 



I I 1 I 



■ ■ I I II 



L» u :: u. 1 . ■■ : 



LET'S RENT 




ONE-BEDROOM NO 

smoke** 1021 Fremont 
1385 utilities Included. 
January lease. Monday 
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FOUH-BEDHOOM, two 

bath Fenced yard, 

garage. Pets ok. 
785- 3 1 7-77 13. 



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Manhattan CITY Ordi- 
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ery person equal opportu- 
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net. aex, tamlNtl tlatua, 
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religion, age, color, na- 
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Violations should be re- 
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Hall, (785)587-2440. 




MANHATTAN CITY Ordi- 
nance 4814 aasures ev- 
ery person equal opporl u- 
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Unci Ion on account of 
race, sex, famlHal atatut, 
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religion, age, color, na- 
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m m twu-ytu- 

ROOMS available now or 
January 1 . Only a lew left, 
4295 and up. Hurry< Cap- 
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>85-34t-0e86 

ONE BEDROOM Cbse 
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785 587-0399 

TWO- BEDROOM APART- 
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Lease from January 1- 
July 31 Contact Tyler 
913 226-0922 

TWO-BEDROOM ONE 
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1420 Boachwood Ter- 
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TWO-BEDHOOM/ ONE 
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apartment near the mall 
call Wildcat Property at 
785-537-2332 




THREE-BEDROOM Du- 
plex, fenced yard, avail 
able now. Pets allowed 
Close to campus, 218 
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785 313-6251 




ROOMMATE 
immediately. 
Clean newly remodeled 
three -bedroom, two bath 
house, garage available, 
washer' dryer Call 
785-820-7612. 

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Private bath First month 
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tor rent. Preler veterinar- 
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FFMALE STUDENT to 
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for household chorea. 
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neighborhood two miles 
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month plus one -forth utili- 
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All appliances supplied 
Call 785-332-6152 ask for 
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ROOMMATE WANItD 
lor Spring Semester Nice 
house, close to campus. 
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620-382-7241 




QUIET ONE-BEDROOM 
across Irom campus $500 
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January 7 B5-3 17-2186 

SUBLEASER NEEDED 
lor a si « bedroom house 
Close to campus. $260 a 
month plus one -sixth of 
January through 
May 9t3-70»224o 

SU8LEASER NEEDED 
lor Spring 2007 semester 
$315 per month Four-bed- 
room apartment. January 
rent paid 785-418 1778 

SUBLEASER WANTED 
as soon as possible Nice 
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$350/ month (willing to 
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Call Brand! ai 

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SUBLEASE R WANTED 
lor Catholic women's 
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campus $310/ month in- 
cludes utilities, food, rent 
Live in dorms? May work 
deal 1 Call 765-366-6342 

SU8LEASERS NEEDED 
for two bedrooms in a 
four-bedroom house 

$325 a month 

620-338-3675 

SUBLEASERS NEEDED 
spring 2007 for three-bed- 
room, one and one half 
bath apartment. one 
minute walk to campus 
$780 per month or $260 
per person plus electricity 
Contact: ogray&ksu sou 
or 913-481-1334 

THREE ROOMS available 
for sublease in three-bed 
room, one bath for Spring 
semester. One block from 
AggievlHe. 917 Moro 
$330/ month 
785-317-1263 

TWO FEMALE Sub- 
leasars needed for stx- 
bedroom house Alt bills 
included in rem. $329 per 
month Call Lindsey 
620-242*451 



TWO-BEDROOM ONE 
bath $275 each, plus utili- 
ties One block Irom cam- 
pus. Need two spring sub- 
leasers Call 
620-874-5900 ask for 
Bryan A/mend an; 



FEMALE 
wanted, 
Big five 
includes 
ofl-srreet 
lul place, 
males 
316-210 



ROOMMATE 
January - July 
bedroom duplex 
aU appliances, 
parking Beauti- 
wonderful room- 
Call Courtney 
5975 



ONE-BEDROOM, walk to 
class. No drinking. Smok- 
ing, or pels. 765-539 1554 

THREE. FOUR. FIVE, SIX 
PLUS BEDROOMS Look 
ing for thai perfect noma 
lo rent' Greal selection 
and prices Capstone 
Management 
785-341-0686 

THREE - SEVEN-BED 
ROOM houses near cam- 
pus for next year June' 
August leases all have 
central air. full kllcnent, 
and washer/ dryer. Call 
now tor best selection 
785-341-1897. 

TWO-BEDROOM 
HOUSE Available Jan- 
uary 1, 2007 Close lo 
campus No pata. Can 
785-539- 1 976 or 

785-313-4465 




Employment Careers 




FEMALE SU8LEASER 
needed tor two-bedroom, 
two bath apartment 
Brand new Washer' 
dryer Walking distance to 
campus. 765-545-5106 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 
needed immediately 

Close to campus, ofl- 
street parking $400 a 

month utilities included. 
913-961-0673. 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 
needed. spring 2007 
semester $330' month 
Available January - May. 
Nice, newer, three-bed- 
room house, built 1997, 
785-221 -2282 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 
needed Renl $255 plus 
utilities. Off-street parking, 
washer' dryer, no pels, no 
smoking, four-bedroom 
house Katie 
785-230-7266. 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 
warned to share four -bed- 
room/ two bath apartment. 
First month Iree. $315' 
month Available now 
lb rough July 2007. 
907-232-4601. 

MALE SUBLEASE 
wanted for January 2007 
lo August. Close to cam- 
pus/ Aggieville $290 plus 
utilities Call 
91 3- 775-2083 

MALE SUBLEASER 
needed In January $300 
per monlh, plus one -third 
utilities Three -bedroom, 
two balh Call 
785-342-2932 

MALE SUBLEASER 
needed Spring 2007, 
dose lo campus $300 
per monlh plus one-hall 
utilities Please call Bran 
don Baytess 
785-230-0512 

MALE SUBLEASER 

wanted Close to campus, 
washer and dryer four- 
bedroom, rent $370 
Needed by January. 
765-262-0899 

ONE-BEDROOM NICE 
apartment, three minutes 
from campus No pets. 
$450 per month Call 
913-634-087* available 
December to August 



THE COLLEGIAN cannot 
verity the financial poten- 
tial of advertisements In 
the Employment/Career 
classification. Readers 
art advised to approach 
any tuch business oppor- 
tunity with rea- 
sonable cau- 
tion. The Collegian urges 
our readers lo contact the 
Better Business Bureau, 
501 SE Jefferson, 
TopeKa, KS 66607-1190. 

""»*"*■ 

4 OLIVES Wine Bar now 

hiring lunch cooka. Flexi- 
ble hours, competitive 
pay Apply in person 3033 
Anderson Avenue 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSIS- 
TANT Join our proles- 
atonal team as we intro- 
duce CivicPIus E- Govern 
ment innovations to Cities 
and Countries across the 
US This challenging posi- 
tion requires the ability lo 
handle multiple tasks and 
priorities while maintain- 
ing a positive and ener- 
getic altitude $12/ hour, 
Full-time only, opportuni- 
ties for advancement. E- 
maii resume In Microsoft 
Word or Text formal to 
jobs i jVciv lcpfus.com 

APPLICATION SUPPORT 
Analyst position available 
al Steel & Pipe Supply 
Position is responsible for 
business process design 
testing, training, and sup- 
port Qualifications in- 
clude BS In business, 
computer science, or re- 
lated field. Must have gen- 
eral knowledge of busi- 
ness processes. Inter- 
ested candidates should 
submit resume to Person- 
nel Department, App Sup- 
port Analyst. PO Box 
1688, Manhattan, Kansas 
66505 Equal Opportunity 
Employer. 



APPLICATIONS PRO- 
GRAMMER position avail- 
able al Steel & Pipe Sup- 
ply Primary function is to 
develop reports, applica- 
tions and internal func- 
tionality and support 
server and PC hardware' 
software. Qualifications In- 
clude Computer Science 
or related degree or five 
years equivalent experi- 
ence. Detailed knowledge 
of JAVA. C, or C++ pro- 
gramming laguages and 
added plus Candidates 
should submit resume to 
Personnel Department, 
Applications Programmer, 
PO Box 1686, Manhat- 
lan. Kansas 66505 Equal 
opportunity employer 

BARTENDING' $300 a 
day potential. No experi- 
ence necessary Training 
provided Call 

1-600-965-6520 ail 144 

CATTS GYMNASTICS 8 
Dance In Wamego is seek- 
ing a dance instructor for 
iaiz. tap & dogging 
classes and gymnastics 
coaches tor recreational 
and learn levels. Please 
cell 785-456-6488 lor addi- 
tional information, ask for 
Angle Curtis 

COMMUNICATIONS ANA- 
LYST position available at 
Steel & Pipe Supply Co 
Qualified candid ato wiH be 
able to manage IP and 
Legacy Phone Systems 
Candidate will be respon- 
sible for management of 
all Communication con- 
tracts, maintenance con- 
tracts, and service con- 
tracts. Attention to detail 
and ability tor thorough 
documentation is desired 
General IP networking ex- 
perience and wUUngrMta 
to learn new technology is 
required. Interested candi- 
dates should submit re- 
sume to Personnel Depart- 
ment Communications 
Analyst, PO Box 1686 
Manhattan, KS 66505 
Equal Opportunity Em- 
ployer. 

COOK NEEDED si Westy 
Community Care Home 
Competitive wage, flexible 
scheduling. Contact 
Nancy, Highway 99 and 
Main Westmoreland. 
785-457-2901 

CREATIVE DIRECTOR 
CivicPIus Is the nations 
leading provider of City. 
County, and School web- 
sites This is a lull -lime. 
Manhattan based posi- 
tion. You wilt be in charge 
of directing the creative 
process, including brain- 
storming with staff, meet- 
ing with customers and 
providing the creative vi- 
sion necessary lo give our 
customers outstanding 
and award winning web- 
sites Salary commensu- 
rate with experience. Ben- 
efits include health, den- 
tal, paid holidays, paid va- 
cation and 40tK match- 
ing. Email resume In Mi- 
crosoft Word or lext for- 
mat to jobi@clwcplus - 
com. Include cover letter 
explaining your capabili- 
ties. 

EARN $2500+ monlhly 
and more to type simple 
ads online www.daleen- 
trytypers com 

EARN $800 - $3200 3 
month to dnve brand new 
cars with ads placed on 
Ihem www AdDrive Team • 
com 




help Wanted 
Jeclion 



CHECK THE 

COLLEGIAN 

CLASSIFIEDS 




EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 
Manhattan Area Hebital 
for Humanity serves both 
the Riley County and Pot- 
tawatomie County areas 
In Kansas The Executive 
Director manages the affili- 
ate t daiy operation* and 
resource development. In- 
creasing fundraislng ef- 
forts In order to sustain 
the organization as ■ vi- 
able community resource. 
Supervision of one part- 
time sttn person also re- 
quired Responsibilities In- 
elude the implementation 
of policies, procedures 
and actions aa approved 
by the Board ol Directors 
(and reccommend same) 
perseverance of pubHc ac- 
countability, and providing 
assistance to committees 
(Church Relation s. Family 
Selection, Nurture. Devel- 
opment, ReStort) Quattfi 
cations include a passion 
for Habitat lor Humanity'* 
mission: proven experi- 
ence In a non-prof* organi- 
sation (administration, 
grant writing, creating and 
maintaining community re- 
lation ships, fundi aising). 
excellent interpersonal, 
written and verbal skills. 
and the ability lo handle 
meet dead- 
publicly, and 
participate as a team 
player A familiarity with 
home construction la a 
plus Exceptional account- 
ing skills and finance un- 
derstanding are required. 
This is a fhree-fourths 
time position: compensa- 
tion dependent upon quali- 
fications and experience 
Applications available by 
contacting Jo Ann R Sut- 
ton, President, by calling 
7B5-34I-4225, tmatt But- 
ton afmhaks org. or by vis- 
iting the web al www men- 
haltenareahabilat org Ap- 
plications must Include a 
minimum of three refer- 
ences Resumes and writ- 
ten correspondence 
should be mailed to 
JoAnn R Sutton. Presi- 
dent. 1 BOO Denholm 
Dnve. Manhattan. Kansas 

66503 

FIRST MANAGEMENT 
has a part-time Inert! I|J 
agent position available 
tor a busy apartment com- 
munity Qualified appli- 
cants must have reliable 
transportation, a willing 
nets to work a varied 
schedule. It is required to 
be able to work full time 
from July 23rd through Au- 
guat 6th for apartment 
turnover Pleaae apply at 
our Chase Manhattan 
Apartment location 1409 
Chase Place, (comer of 
Cotege and Claflln ) No 
phone calls please. Equal 
Opportunity Employer 

GRAPHIC DESIGNER 
Civic Plus is the nation* 
leading provider of city, 
county and school web- 
sites. Both full-time and 
work at-home (contract) 
positions are available 
Full-time benefits Include 
health, dental, paid holi- 
days, paid vacation and 
401 [k} matching. Email 
resume and design sam- 
ples to fobsi&clvlcplus.com 

HARRY'S 0AYT1ME 

DISHWASHER NEEDED. 
Shifts 10am - 3pm on 
Mon-Wed-Fri and/ or 
Tues-Thurs Some night 
and/ or weekend availabil- 
ity Apply in person at 418 
PoynUAve Good Pay 

HELP NEEDED concrete 
mixer drivers full or part- 
lime must have COL lls- 
cense call or stop by Val- 
ley Concrete Operations, 
22620 Highway 24 in 
Befvue Kansas. 

785-458-6499 Free em- 
ployment drug screening 
Greal for students looking 
for pari -lime work. 

HELP WANTED: KSU 
Beef Cattle Research Cen- 
ter Contact Mali Quinn 
at 765-539-4971 or 
mjq@ksu.edu. 

MYSTERY SHOPPERS 
Earn up lo $150 Experi- 
ence not required Under- 
cover shoppers needed to 
|udge retail and dining as 
labkshments. Call 

600-722-4791. 

NETWORK TECHNICIAN 
Due lo our recem expan- 
sion. Networks Plus has a 
new opening for a full- 
bme Computer Network 
Technician in Manhattan 
Positive attitude, profes- 
sionalism, strong work 
ethic and one or more 
years of computer support 
experience or equivalent 
training is required E-mail 
resume lo jobs@network- 
aplus.com in Microsoft 
Word or Text format 
Equal Opportunity Em- 
ployer 



PART-TIME PERSONAL 
care attendant needed lor 
a 19 year old female 
Wishing to attend Kansas 
State this January Duties 
would Include assisting 
in the morning 
evenings II kiter- 
call 620-375-2200 

PROGRAMMER CIVIC - 
PLUS Is the nations lead- 
ing provider of city, county 
and school websites Full 
• time position In Manhat- 
tan, Microsoft ASP or 
SOL experience required 
$14 50/ hour plus hetlth, 
dental, paid holidays, paid 
vacation and 401 tk) 
matching. Email resume 
In Microsoft Word or Wit 
format lo joos*$civ*cpfu& - 
,:fjm 

RANDALL'S FORMAL 
Wear is looking for a part- 
time sales person with out- 
standing customer service 
skills Flexible hours great 
starting wage and commis- 
sion program. If you 
would like to |oln our learn 
stop by and fW out tn ap- 
plication at 100 Manhat- 
tan Town Canter Mall 
785-770-9011 

SALES ASSOCIATE Pro- 
vlde customer service in 
Ihe Art/ Technology de- 
partment Pnce and stock 
merchandise. abHily to lift 
40 lbs dimb ladders and 
operate cutting equip- 
ment Position will also 
provide salee and service 
of cell phone plans and 
computers/ software. Pref- 
erence will be given to 
candidales with back- 
ground or experience in 
art techniques/ supplies, 
architecture or engineer- 
ing Hours: Safurday 2pm- 
6p.m. and Sunday 11a.m.- 
- 5pm 

STUDENT OFFICE Assiv 
lanl needed in a 
paced, oflen high traffic 
business office Must 
have good working knowl- 
edge ol Word and Excel 
Musi be a self-motivated, 
quick learner with a good 
attention to details and 
proofreading. Previous of- 
fice experience highly pre- 
ferred Apply In Kedzie 
103 and include spring 
2007 schedule 
SYSTEMS ANALYST po- 
silion available at Sleel A 
Pipe Supply Co. Qualified 
candidate will be able lo 
accurately troubfashoot 
hardware and software is- 
sues and provide detailed 
technical assistance to 
the end user for aU PC 
and peripheral systems 
Cisco networking. Mi- 
crosoft Server. and 
VMWare experience is 
preferable Two - Five 
years experience and or 
education in Server or Net- 
work Management is re- 
quired. Interested candi- 
date* should submli re- 
sume to Personnel Depart- 
ment, Systems Analyst, P- 
O Box 1668 Manhattan. 
Kansas 66505 Equal op- 
portunity Employer. 

TELEPHONY TECHNI- 
CIAN The Phone Connec- 
tion Is a fast growing 
voice networking (VOIP) 
company in need of Tele- 
phony Technicians In 
Sal in a Manhattan, 

Topeka and Kansas City. 
Positive attitude, proles - 
sionallsm. strong work 
ethic and one oi mote 
years of telephone or com- 
puter networX support ex- 
perience or equivalent 
training Is required Bene- 
flta Include Health, Dental. 
Paid Holidays. Paid Vaca- 
tion. Paid Training and 401 - 
(k) matching. E-mail re- 
sume to Jobs iS 1 locks com 
in Microsoft Word or Text 
format 

WEB DESIGNER. Award 
winning advertising 

agency, Imagemakers. 
seeks full-time web devel- 
oper' web designer Some 
training provided Apply it 
www.wamegowork.com. 



Reach 

morei 

readers I 

Place your 

classified ad 

online. Get 

more bang for 

your buck 



A<fcKOK»ul«ltobe 

punted m the 

CrJtoMri un be 



tor S2 mw. 



AUBURN WASHBURN 
USD 437, TOPEKA, KS 

has openings starting 1/5/07: 

•Math- Secondary 
•Lang Arts- Gr. 7& 8 
•Part-time Lit. Coach -Elem 
•Art-Elem 

Applications available on line at 
www.usd437.net or call Debbi 



Williams 5928 SW 53rd St. 
Topeka, KS 66610 
785-339-4037 



Clay County 
Medical Center 

Full- time position for 

nurse on the 7P-7A 

shift working three 

nights per week. 

Shift differential and 

specialty differentials 

paid for capability of 

working ICU. ER. or OB 

specialty areas. Paid 

continuing education. 

Low nurse to patient 

ratio with the help of 

an aide Registered 

Nurse preferred. 

For more ytfofmation 

about Ihe Clay County 

Medical Center check 

us out at 

www.ccmcks.org . 

Print an application or 

pick one up at the Clay 

County Medical Center: 

PO.BokS12 

61 7 Liberty 

Clay Center 67432 

Post -offer drug screen and 

physical required EOE 



Need Some 

Help? 




Advertise 

it in the 




Open Market 




HttKKJae mm 




FOR SALE; Salt water 
nanowrsath aquarium 
$200 or best oiler Call 
785-395-5074. 



Got o\d 
stuff? 




Ttaraportatton 




1990 CHEVY Blazer 
LOTS of recent work, runs 
great' $2000 or Best Offer 
78S- 226 1620 



RID 




Travel- "trips 



HI SPRING Break Web- 
site' Low Pnces Guararv 
teed. Group discounts for 
6+ Booh 20 people, get 3 
tree (rips' wwwSpnng- 
BreaKbiscounts.com or 
800-836-8202. 

DON! MISS out' Spring 
Break 2007 is approach- 
ing and STS is offering 
specials to this year's 
honest destinations 1 CaH 
for savings 

1 -BO0-648-4849 or visit 
www ststravel com 



in the 

Kansas State 

COLLEGIAN' 

103 t.tdzit 
532-6655 



get a job 



su|do|ku 



PHI in the grid so that every row, 

every column, and every 3x3 box 

contains the digits 1 through 9 

with no repeats. 



4 
2 3 
8 



1 



8 



4 3 
6 8 
7 9 



3 1 
5 2 
9 6 



8 



4 



5 
4 9 
7 



1 



Solution and tips 
at www.sudoku.com 



2 OFF 

any regular or large sub 




Deadlines 



Gassified ads must be 
placed by noon the day 
before you want your ad 
to run. Classified display 

ads must be placed by 
4 p.m. two working days 

prior to the date you 

want your ad to run. 

QUI 785-532-6555 



Classified Rates 



1DAY 

20 words or less 
110.50 

each word over 20 
20( per word 

2 DAYS 

20 words or less 
$12.95 

each word over 20 
25( per word 

3 DAYS 

20 words or less 

(15.65 

each word over 20 

30< per word 

4 DAYS 

20 words or less 
S1790 

each word over 20 
35c per word 

5 DAYS 

20 words or less 

WO 00 

each word over 20 

40( per word 

{consecutive day rate) 



Jo Place An Ad 



Go to Kediie 103 (across 

from the K-State 
Student Union.) Office 

hours are Monday 

through Friday from 

8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 



How fo Pay 



All classifieds must be 
paid in advance unless 
you have an account 

withStudent 

Publications Inc. Cash, 

check, MasterCard Of 

Visa are accepted. 

There is a $25 service 

charge on all returned 

checks. We reserve the 

right to edit, reject or 

properly classify any ad. 



Free found Ads 



As a sewe to you, we 

run found ads for three 

days free of charge. 



Corrections 



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your ad, please call us. 

We accept responsibility 

only for the first wrong 

insertion 



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tf you sell your item 

before your ad has 

expired, we will refund 

you for the remaining 

days. You must call us 

before noon the day 

before the ad is to be 

published 



Headlines 



For an extra charge, 

we'll put a headline 

above your ad to catch 

the reader's attention. 



\ 



ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT | SEX | fOOO | YOUR LIFE 

THE EDGE 



Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2006 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 8 



.Getting Real' 



THE£AST 

Cm member Tyrit fry) laliard 
(pkturtd M bonom} hills front 
Onwjlit, Ntb, Ty, 21, was born on 
Dec. 7th, 1M2, This Is Ty'i second 
rtoltty (how ippeirance, ii he wit 
or* of tht frit brothers of Tommy 
lM during Tommy let Goes to 
CoNtft," tortured it tht University 
if Nwrnki — Lincoln, where ht 
r*c»rrt*y graduated. 

Nkete (Colie) M.fdisofi, 22, was 

born and resides in East Brunswick, 
NJ. CoHc (pictured top rightl 
recently completed her degree 
in communications from Tulane 
University In New Orleans. Recently, 
she made it about halfway through 
the next Real World/Road Rules 
Challenge "The Inferno 3" before 
being sent home. 

Partygirl Jcnn Grijahn, 22, lives 
in Martinez, Calif., while studying 
at Diablo Valley College in Pleasant 
Hill, Calif., while raising her child. 
Jenn (pictured left) was recently an 
Oakland Radierette, cheering for 
the Oakland Raiders of the National 
Football League for about four years. 
Today, she still teaches dance and 
dwreography. 

Southern belle §roew J, LiBir* 
fern, 24, was born ind still resides 
In NtfrwikTMn,, whore she also 
cun jl m l her draw In communlci- 
ttorts from Belmont University Irooke 
(pictured tower right) ventured away 
n^rWr^iotryllfeoutlnLos 
ArnjelM when she wu recruited to be 
«tNIWVM4¥jiMySpic»-i 
fnt fw MIVi MMjr imwl 

I Mi MM W ww bom on 

tag.U,1N3,lnMirMi«,Gi Davis 
(pictured right) earned i buslnosi 
tnd modWno degree (mm Stetson 
UnhOT»ltylnMiy.Aibisttt«dontrit 
lM episode, ht wMB to become i 
■iMk Mpn On tht Otrwer ust 
Dews Is chtllenged by other cist 
muhbtn lor tht too thtt ht It gay 
mdothrtniin, 




— i, 23, oonwi fWTI SK* 
nm*CriLbuUcun*nth«MKl- 

KM0tm (pictured top toft) pirns 

■muring 2007, 



. _ .', Wfoi the 
knunttofki to Mtrnd law tchooi *nd get 
i oner In pvbftc service. This devout 
CMrtM Mi by tht wort of tht Lord 
id I (t stjhwyjb y Mow Ovtttton 

Heartthrob Alex Snrtli, 22, is 
the voumgesi ust member of fhis 
season on "The Real World" Straight 
from Houston, Tews, A|e« (pictured 
mrtolel ajlendedjuiaooa. Sl*Wi 
University. A swimmet on tfie ASU 
swim tern, MHMjM*d ow| - 

confidMW^^mmediattiy 

uuvjot female cast 




MTV launches season 18 of Real World,' 
pushes reality TV past previous limits 

Within the premiere of MTVs "The Real World: Denver," seven cast members pushed 
reality TV expectations to the Limits. 

The seven cast members - four guys, three girls - dived into their S3 3 million house 
with little less than what their mothers gave them In their first day in the house alone. 
two girls (Brooke and Jenn) made out, with Ty wanting to get in on the action; a guy 
and a girl (Colie and Alex) made out, too. Even better, Colie hooks up with Alex, ex- 
pressing her love for him to other cast mates. Alex freaks out, decides that commitment 
isn't exactly for him and sleeps with fellow party-girl roommate, jenn. What exactly will 
the relationship hold? The roommate struggles don't stop here, however. Davis also 
struggles tn get along with Ins roommate Stephen who UgBM Davis cannot be a true 
Christian and gay at the same time. While they both call it a truce on the first episode, 
Davis' sexual insecurities are likely to nip him in the bud, as Davis has clearly expressed 
he has no problem with making out and/or sleeping with women. 

Over the top, overdramatic - that is what this season of "The Real World" will likely 
be. You don't want to miss it, Watch the show at 9 p.m. Wednesdays on MTV 

Annatt* Lawtau | C0LlEUI.Pt 



Reality timeline 

A look at the era that changed television 




1950 



1960 





1970 



nw12-pjnr«*yswifr*sJ 
RlM)r" MflMM r tal of 1 1 
farriyoanodwwoniA 

~ L, aft, I'-^-JM * ^J 

w w um HurjUBm mo 

it ii i i# 1 ii t jj iii i f 



1991 -Talk shows >, 

Talk shows lie The Jerry Springer 
Show" and "ftkki Lake" presented 
audiences with real -life drama In a 
talk -show format. 



1980 



1990 



tlttf - Darting shows 

I by (Juki Bams, The Dittos 
«ns the first dating reilrcy 
ttatamNontiMfff 
|« of batitetoret* and three 
frl»epk»o»ikoppos)fcs« 
Kit bachelor would irawtwr the 
ifci^fcr»«t-i«dpotwtiil 
i«totto fttf ii > Niwous ronstsane 
Mud* Smawit Somen, hmst 




. 



.1M9-C0K 

When ft first aired. COPS showed 
police officers apprehending oW- 
nab from a camcorder 



• • • 




focaOtaio compete tor cold hard 
cash. Through a series of rivJenoes. 
contKSfjvNs no eftotnind] uhhI 
there b one sunwor. The flrst 
season peaked as the No J show in 
thtcoi^wMi8mttioiivtevtrs 

2Wl-"SiHiptel 

f*o art hems IVHtofli 

I ■ rfc i I I *■"— *- DL4Wk 

UKUKy IBWifl IWXMf raQHr 1 

sanpirfttun.Wl.wtmtheyc 
it> Ihar aH phono aadatdk cards 
to fcr« a nwoth In Aran, Art. Tnt 
s«t« isat taken m tjrtt on a rood 
tr* bad tolas Awjeies, to kroem- 
sfclpvindtomrrrwrtioodlswton. 



> 



2000 




ttOw Wm WW*. ItW Wv 

KewiroiVorainNaiK* 
nffoaHy to the small «rw. 

tarn rotsm its* lr«vt 
sho**U)foirt)noed»»rrsl8 

hhlotyt 





I 



2003 -Rich teens < 

"Ujuna Beach: The Real Orange 
County' — this American reality TV 
show documents the lives of several 
wealthy teenagers from Orange 
County in California. 



of 



2005-Naytwy 

the series foHows tht ttm of 
naybeynv^lHughHefrver's 

MjuuU nUth\±juii IIjJIl 

atofrae gvnrKfMD. rnny 

a^lwmlnWiinion. 
Lrieorroes mm ofinet ftsnt 
Hlnon and the women of 
Playboy hive made ame* 
son the show. 



v2001- Staple's pwadist 

**0n Ternptatioft htand.'cotipks 
miMror^iittrrutttntis 
tkry tgnt to ftw with atfmttfc 
skno)epeopteofr}Mapposhcse][ 
Can *«y beat the tarrftatiottf Tb* 
Tini stjiun we i simohi, with the 
stood and third seasons oMtftrad 



v2Q03- Hoax reality 

**Bachtlor Evan ktottott pfeter* 
that he has inhtmed rmlliorH as he 
is on the starch for i potential br* 
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won tht heart of one woman, em 
after tttTingher the truth Hie two 
wwstiTirfiedwitliarnilliondoflar 
reward, although the question still 
stands, Does money p**ty misterr 

.v2003- Newly weds' 

^Hewfywed pop stars Ntck Lachey 
and Jessica Simpsons lives were 
documented for two years on this 
hit series Although the marriage 
ended this June, who could ever 
forget Jessica's infamous question 
about 'Chicken of the Sea" - *h this 
chicken that I haw or is it Ashr 
Simpson asked. 



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35B0se in search of reality should live life, not watch it on TV 

I1||KUIP< 



By Jonas Hogg 
KANSAS STATE rOLlEOIAN 

I wonder. How many mouth- 
breathers, people with one eyebrow 
and |ay hawks with 11 toes 
does it take to perpetuate our 
reality television fetish? What 
keeps this canned lobotomy in 
production' Help me wonder. 

This would be excusable 
if it contributed something 
- anything For this I'll excuse 
shows like "American Chop- 
per" and home design shows, 

from which one can learn 

something, even if it is dramatized 

Escapism is not in itself a bad thing. 
In eras long forgotten, people con- 




JONAS 
HOGG 



versed, took hobbies or read books 
- no really, from cover to cover, big 
words and all. But the endless parade 
of people in their ugliest and most 
wretched moments makes me long for 
something simple - a plague 
or slaughter by Mongol hordes 
would be nice. 

What have these produced: 

"Survivor: Herpes Peninsula." 

"Big Brother The Toilet Cam 

Years" and MTV's crown 

jewel, ostensibly called, "The 

Real World," which consists 

of pretty people with gnats' 

■ brains, stray dogs' morals and 

no yobs living in nice places for free. 

And let us not forget one or two scant 

offerings of racial diversity; man can- 



not make a "Real World" on white 
bread alone 

In 1998, when Irene McGee was 
slapped on camera by her male room- 
mate, he was ordered to take anger 
management classes but allowed to 
stay on the show, How's this for reality 
TV: slap an MTV executive on a pub- 
lic street. We can make a reality show 
of the jail cell you share with R Kelly 
called "Golden Shower Camera," 

But the thickheaded masses are 
ravenous for the slobbering mistreat- 
ment these shows provide. "Survivor" 
wouldn't have lasted if they tied teams 
together and told them sink or swim 
Fans wait wide-eyed for each episode's 
end, wherein one unfortunate gets 
tossed off the island of love and into 



the glowing seas of venereal disease 

It is not so much the consequence- 
less life or the total disregard of hu- 
manity that would make concentration 
camp guards cringe. It's the inescap- 
able reality that it is, every last drop, 
so abysmally stupid and eye-gougingly 
bad In less than 24 hours, people ar- 
rive by carriage or limousine, confess 
their darkest secrets and hop into bed 
together - all in a day's work. 

Yes, the options are limitless. "Jack- 
ass" - as Maddox once opined, the 
only show ever named after its target 
audience; "The Bachelor" - which 
should be retitled "Who Wants to 
Marry a Cutthroat Bimbo?"; and, the 
most precious of all, Ihc dating show 
"She's a worn-out stripper; he's 35 



and works at a gas station; let's see 
what happens" Let's feign ignorance 
that they're either A: going to get into 
some chimpanzee, turd-slinging fight 
or B: go home together Try selling a 
date where two functional people go 
gel coffee, talk about politics and de- 
cide to call each other later We want 
the offal of society, with extra tattoos 
and a gut ring 

So you say you want reality: go out- 
side, eat a sandwich, call someone, play 
with a dog, pay your bills, get bitten by 
a spider. Reality, like food, is best not 
received through a tube. 

ton it Hoff b a sealer m saboltfy, IateniitSonil 
studies and Russian. You can tfruil him it 
(doewtfvh.bu.trfv. 



BUTTERED I The New K-State Mascot 




I 




KANSAS STAT 




INSIDE 

The color pink 
has moved 
beyond fashion, 
into pop culture 

TIM cd£4, "*^a a 




few w kstatccnllcgi an , com 



Thursday, November 30, 2006 



Vol II I. No 70 



Postmarked history 




Photoi by Chriitoptwr Hanawinckal | COHWWK 
Tim Lindemuth, editor of K-Sutar magazi na for the K-Stati Alumni Association, has collected stamps for SO years and received awards for his col lection. His collec- 
tion focuses mainly on 20-cent stamps called "Flag over the Supreme Court." 

Editor of K-Stater magazine wins gold medal for rare stamp collection 



By Nlcoia Johnston 

KANSAS STATE COLL MAN 

For someone who knows nothing 
about stamps, it might be surprising to 
team that a stamp spliced and held to- 
gether with green masking tape could 
be part of an award -winning stamp 
collection 

In fact, this stamp helped Tim Lin- 
demuih, editor of K-Stater magazine 
for the K-State Alumni Association, 
win an international gold medal for 
his stamp collection 

The collection is focused on 20- 
ccnt stamps made horn 1981 to 1985 
called the "Rag over the Supreme 
Court." 

Although he has collected stamps 
fer 50 years, it wasn't until the early 
ItHOs that Lindemuth became in 
jrolved with competitive exhibiting of 
hjs stamps. 

~ "I became bored with collecting 
and wanted to do something differ- 
ent," he said, "I thought, 1 think I can 
3b that, but I'm going to do it with a 



modem stamp because so many of the 
exhibits are the classics, where many 
people have paid a lot of money and 
have been collecting for a very long 
time, I felt like a pioneer blazing a 
new trail." 

It only took Lindemuth a couple 
years to win his first national gold 
medal, but he continued to seek the 
international gold medal. Lindemuth 
said it's hard to win an international 
gold medal because there is specific 
criteria, including a large emphasis on 
scarcity and rarity, for a collection. 

"There are stamps out there, if you 
have the money, you can buy them, 
but something that is truly scarce is 
unique and one of a kind," he said. 
"The difficulty of acquisition is so im- 
portant at the international exhibition 
level." 

lindemuth had to wait 19 years to 
find the rarest stamp for his collection: 
a 17-cent and a 20-cent stamp spliced 
together by mistake. In 1986, he tried 
to win the stamp in a phone auction 

"Finally there are only two people 




This sat of stamps, a 1 7 -cent and a 20-cent stamp spliced together by mistake, 
helped Lindemuth win an international gold medal for his sump collection. 



left, and I really want this because I 
know it is the key for my collection," 
he explained. "Sadly, I had to drop out 
because the other guy had a bigger 
checkbook than I did. After the auc- 
tion, we became friends and started to 
write each other." 

The two stamp collectors kept in 
touch until three years ago when the 
winning bidder died. Then, last sum- 
mer, Lindemuth received a phone call 
offering htm the stamp he once tried 
to win. 

After adding the most scarce stamp 
he could find to his collection, Linde- 
muth was ready to win an internation- 



al gold medal 

In 1996, Lindemuth competed in 
the international competition and 
won the Vermil medal, but the judges 
didn't think his collection had enough 
scarcity and rarity. 

He had to wait 10 years to try 
again, because the international com- 
petition happens only once every 10 
years 

Ten years was just enough time for 
him to perfect his collection to com- 
pete in Washington this past summer 

"I'm positive that it was this one 

Stt STAMP Fie* 5 



CEO describes business difficulties, advises students 




Joilyn Brown |C0UICI»N 
Steve Lacy, prastdant and CEO of Mar adrth Corporation and K State graduate, 
addresses audience members at McCain Auditorium. Meredith Corp publishes various 
magazines and special-interest publications sold in more than 60,000 retail outlets. 



By Magan Molrtor 

KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

Many companies are investing in 
the Internet, and Meredith Corpo- 
ration is no exception, said Stephen 
Lacy, CEO and president of the com- 
pany 

"We have invested steadily in the 
Internet." Lacy said "We own and 
operate 30 Web sites. Our first foray 
into the Internet was with agricul- 
lure.com." 

Lacy spoke Wednesday morning 
to a crowded McCain Auditorium 
as part of the College of Business 
Administrations Distinguished Lec- 
ture Series. He was introduced by 
the college's dean, Yar M Ebadi, as a 
K State graduate with bachelor's and 
master's degrees in accounting who 
has held his current position at Mer- 



edith Corporation since July 2006, 

"We are privileged to have some- 
one with his wealth of business 
knowledge," Ebadi said. "He truly is 
a distinguished Wildcat." 

To begin, Lacy gave an overview 
of the company's operations. 

He said Meredith Corporation is 
responsible for 26 subscription mag- 
azines like "Family Circle," "Better 
Homes and Gardens" and "Ladies' 
Home Journal" It operates 200 spe- 
cial-interest publications, 400 books 
and 15 television stations, and gener- 
ates $16 million in revenue 

"We have a long track record of 
delivering large financial results," 
Lacy said. 

Lacy said Meredith Corporations 
spends a substantial amount of time 

Set ADVICE PaoeS 



Missouri 

student 

dies in fire 



8y Scott Gward 

KANSAS STATE COUEUAN 

A student at the University of Mis- 
souri-Sl Louis died early Wednesday in 
a fire at the university's Pi Kappa Alpha 
fraternity house 

The victim was identified as Brian 
Schlittler, 25, a senior at the university, 

Chad Bowman, president of the K 
State chapter of Pike, said the fraternity 
will solicit donations from its members 
and from the Manhattan community to 
help the victim's family and school. 

"We are trying to ease the pain, and 
every little thing helps," he said. 

Bowman said he has never dealt 
with a situation like this at Pike 

Schlitter was one of three students 
who lived in the small chapter house 
in SL Louis. When one student arrived 
home to find a couch on fire, he alerted 
the other two residents. 

Schlitter, whose room was on the 
second floor, did not follow the other 
two students out of the house By the 
time the two realized this, Schlitter was 
unable to get downstairs because of the 
fire. The windows were too small to al- 
low an escape. 

The house was quickly engulfed in 
flames so hot they reportedly melted a 
small car in the parking lot. 

The incident happened less than two 
weeks after a Ere, started by fireworks, 
killed a student at a fraternity house at 
Nebraska's Wesleyan University 

Authorities are investigating the 
cause of the St. Louis fire, but local resi- 
dents did not report hearing fireworks 
or partying. 

Bowman said Pike has a crisis man- 
agement plan to deal with any emer- 
gency at the K- State chapter. He said 
this includes an endowment plan to 
help any victims financially 

— The Associated Pr*» cwttrtfcuted to this 



'Nutcracker' 

to receive 

modern twist 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGtAM 

As the holiday season continues, 
K- State will welcome a classic musi- 
cal with a new twist. 

Slate Street Ballet will perform 
"The Hollywood Nutcracker" at 7:30 
p.m. Friday in McCain Auditorium. 

"Most people have never had the 
opportunity to see this show," said 
Thomas Jackson, marketing and de- 
velopment officer for McCain Audi- 
torium. "It's a new spin on a tuneless 
classic.'* 

The Hollywood Nutcracker" is an 
adaptation of the Tchaikovsky classic 
set in the 1930s. Although it uses the 
same score as the classic Nutcracker, 
the State Street performance will fea- 
ture different sets, costumes and char 
acter development. 

"The music will be exactly the 
same score, but the setting will be 
different," lack son said. "People are 

SttNUTOtAttaiPastS 




Today's forecast 

Snow showers 
High: 28 Low: 13 



ONLINE 



Hospice care month 

November is the National Hospice/Pal lative Care 
Month. To read how students have contributed, 
see story at wwwJntatK9fkfhn.com. 



CAMPUS NEWS HIGHLIGHTS 



Library lecture 

lames Neal. vice president for 

Information Technology and 
university librarian for Columbia 
University, will speak at 10:10 
a.m. today at the Hemisphere 
Room in Hale library Neal will 
speak on current and future 
trends with both the malaise 
and the vitality of the academic 
research library. 



Architecture exhibit 

The Chang Gallery in Seaton Hall 
features the Italian Railway and 
Postal Building Architecture from 
1928 to 1943 by Anqwlo Mamrni 
It will be on display until Friday 
The gallery is open from 8 a.m. to 
5 p.m. Michael McNamara, profes- 
sor of architecture, organized the 
exhibition. 



1st- ever Yunk award 

Andy Tompkins, former Kansas 
commissioner of education, will 
be presented with the first-ever 
Oan and Cheryl Yunk Excellence In 
Educational Administration Award 
from the College of Education. 
He will receive the award, which 
includes a plaque and a $1,000 
award, Dec ,1 at the commence- 
ment ceremony 



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young chlven abort the QAwemnienrs roie in television proctammiig tor chfldreri 



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Page 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Thursday, Nov. 30, 2006 



fflaflin fiooh and fopit* 



IBUCtalimRd 

www.claflmbooks.com 



(785) 77S-3771 
f785) 776-1009 



Puzzles | Eugene Sheffer 



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Claim 
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CflW. 
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goal 
17 Sandwich 

treat 
IB Trinity 

member 
IB Waste 

(away) bit 

by bit 
21 "Touched 

by an 

Anger 

star 

24 Every last 
crumb 

25 Altar 
affirmative 

26 Rotation 
durabon 

25 Exalingly 
lasNoo- 
abte 

32 Campus 
home 

34 Chart 

36 Albacore 

37 Command 
39 Sal of 

equipment 



41 Do 
suturing 

42 Happy 
compan- 
ion? 

44 Mortar- 
board 



46 Urban 

transpon 
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51 Atmo- 
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52 Bit of 
techno- 
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56 Summer- 
time pest 

57 Neigh- 
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58 Disen- 
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59 Eyehdwoe 

60 Vanessa's 
sister 

61 4-Across 
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part 

Solution tl 



DOWN 

1 Flight 

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3 Long 
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develop 

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lion 



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U T Z U SIR S A C J I I' R S A B . 
yesterday'* ( rvplix|uip: TO BH GOOD AT 
WORKING WITH lOomi-D VWIHIN. II HL1 PS 
TO BR A SPRCX'KFT SCIENTIST. 

Today's Cryntuquip Clue: R equals S 



DIVERSIONS 

A waste of time — but you might learn something 



How much do you know about K-State's World AIDS Week events? 



This is World AIDS Week 
Huw much do you know about 
K-State's events? 

1 . What was the name of 
Monday's event in the Little 
Theatre in which a gay man 
told of his sexual and politi- 
cal coining- of -age? 

j life and tragedy" 

b "My life" 

t. "The Night Larry Kramer Kissed Me" 

2. Which campus organi- 
zations are sponsoring 

K State's events for World 
AIDS Week? 

a. Acting on AIDS, Queer/Straight Alliance 
and Artisis for AIDS Amrtneu 

b. Sexual Health Awareness Peer Educators 
and Lafene Health Center 

c. All of the above 

5, When are AIDS awareness 
T-shirts available near the 
Union Food Court? 

1. 11 a.m. to 1p.m. 

b. noon to 2 pm 

t. 10:30 a.m. to 12 -M p.m. 

4. What is the display 
called that will be in Bosto 

Written by Krlilen Rodwkk | COUtGIAN 



JOHNS©* 
ItSI- 



Student Plaza 
Friday? 

a. "Living for a cure' 
b -AIDS Awareness" 
c "lives are at Stake" 

5. Where was the 
Red String Dis- 
play on Wednes- 
day? 

a. In Bosco Student Plaza 

b. In the Quad between Wa- 
ters Hall and Hale Library 

c. In Forum Hall 

6. What does 
AIDS stand for? 

a. Acquired Immune 
Deficiency Syndrome 

b. Ancestral Impassable 
Deficit Syndrome 
(Alien Impermeable 
Dearth Syndrome 

7. What are the 
dates for World 
AIDS week? 

t Nov 26 to Dec. 2 

b Nov, 27 to Dec. 2 
c.Nov.27toDec.l 



If you answered 0-2 correctly, you might 
know the basics of K ■ State's World AIDS 
Week. Maybe you should brush up on your 
knowledge by visiting the display Friday 



IVZ-I"*! 




ISAAC 
AWMOV 
IU0 "Htl 



rMlCHAU- 
It SI" 200} 



If you answered 3 5 cor rect ly , you know 
some about K-State's events and some 
about AIDS in general. You should attend 
the Artists for AIDS Awareness Closing Gala 
and Sileni Donation Art Exhibit 6-9 p.m in 
the Main Ballroom in the K Stale St udenl 
Union. 



If you answered 6 or 7 correctly 
tongratulatiom You're either involved with 
World AIDS Week, or you know your stuff. 
Celebrate by going on AIDS Walk 2006 at 
4:45 p.m. Friday beginning in Bosco Student 
Plaza 



'q 7 'f '9 '<! S '5 > 'f'O l "> I smhsuy 



The planner 

Campus bulletin board 



The planner is the Collegian's campus bulletin board service. 
Items in the calendar can be published up to three times. 
Items might not appear because of space constraints but are 
guaranteed to appear on the day of the activity. To place an 
item in the Campus Calendar, stop by Kedzie 1 16 and fill out 
a form ot e-mail the news editoi at wllegtan@ipubMu.edu 
by 1 1 a.m. two days before It is to run. 

■ Sign up this week for Intramural 3 point shootout by 5 
p.m. today. Individuals or 4 person teams can enter The cost 
is SI per petson plus tat. Competition-will take place Saturday 
and Sunday at assigned times For more information, visit www 
recservrces.Jtsu.edu/imififo or call |78S| 532-6980 

■ AIDS Walk 2006 will begin at 4:45 p.m. Friday in Bosco 
Student Plaza. Ihe walk will end at Vamey's Book Store in 
Aggie vi He. 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral defense 
of the doctoral dtssertatlon of Peng Lu at 2 p.m. Friday in 



Durland 1029. 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral defense 

of the doctoral dissertation ol Mehdt Kabbage at 9 a.m. Mon 
day in Throckmorton 40i1 

a The Graduate School announces the final oral defense 
of the doctoral dissertation of KolluruVijayalakshmi at 1 p.m. 
Monday in Throckmorton 403 1. 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral defense 
of the doctoral dissertation of Jianbin Yu at 2 p.m. Tuesday in 
Throckmorton 20DJ 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral defense 
of the doctoral dissertation of lams Crow at 2: 30 p m in Calvin 
217. 

■ The KSU Save DarfurTeam is collecting new and 
used youth and children's clothing, personal care items like 
toothpaste and soap, and school supplies for Darlur refugees in 
Sudan, Africa. Donations will be accepted in a collection bo* in 
the Union Courtyard until Dec 15 



The blotter | Arrests in Riley County online at www.kstatecoliegian.com. 



Corrections and 

clarifications 

ejections and clarifications run in this 
space If you see something that should be 
corrected, call news editor Leann Suta at 
( 785 ) 532-6SS6 or e-mail aMeqtawyub 
bu.edu. 

Kansas State Collegian 

I USPS 291 020) The Kansas State Collegian, 
a student newspaper at Kansas State Uni- 
versity, is published by Student Publications 
Inc. Kedzie 103, Manhattan, KS 66506 The 
Collegian is published weekdays dunng 
the school year and on Wednesdays dunng 
the summer. Periodical postage is paid at 
Manhattan, KS 66502 POSTMASTER: Send 
address changes to Kansas State Collegian, 
circulation desk. Kedzie 103. Manhattan, KS 
66506-7167. 
i I Kansas State Collegian, 2006 





MonTues4|imlim 
i MM Sun Hid km 



UBBY ' S 

X) $U*°JeH-0 Shots 

$^00 Shots, Wells*, 
M Bottles ^ 




RC McGraws 1 



I 776.9588 



Wildcat headquarters 

before & after the game 

Open at 3pm 









AdVGTtiS© cm&m 

1 18 KEDZIE 785-532-6560 



Appearing 9 -Close 

' Come check out our new I3tf projection screen with surround sound 
— — « Food & Drink Specials m 



fecial! 
ong! 

2317 futile Creek Boulevard 
(In ihe Slue Hills Shopping Center) 




ansas Jtate Choirs and Kansas State Qepartmern'of^usk 

Presents 



estival 




''of 

J^lidai^ 



ment of Musicj- I The K-State greek community would lik« to I 

^~&jf \ . congratulate: | 

m 1 



Featuring: 

The Kansas State Choir & Chorale 

Rod Walker, Director 

William Wingfield, Piano 

Janie Anthony, Student Accompanist 

The KSU Brass Ensemble 

Gary Mortenson & Paul Hunt, Directors 

Mary Ellen Sutton, Organ 




December 1 , 2006 
7:30 pm 

Admission is Free 



MUSIC 



First United Methodist Church 
(6"' & Poyntz) 

For more information please 
contact Jay at (785) 532-3815 



1 



iv Joint Wo 

-Faculty of the month 

Nominated by Delta Delta Delta A 

Allison Voris jF' 

-Greek of the month r^ 

Kappa Delta 

'iulvea Gladil t 

-Alum of the month 

Nominated by Delta Delta Delta 

Thank you 

| for your hard world | 




Thursday, Nov. 30, 2006 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 3 



World simulation mirrors real-world inequality, wars 



By Jonas Hogg 

KANMSSTATt COLLEGIAN 

Mike Wesch, associate 
professor of anthropology, 
had his class playing a world 
simulation Wednesday. 

At the beginning of the se- 
mester, the class divided into 
groups, which then created 
cultures and imported them 
into the year 1450 The groups 
then acted out their parts and 
finished in the year 2100 

"What we're trying to do is 
trying to simulate world his- 
tory and the changes cultures 
undergo in world history," 
said Kevin Champion, senior 
in American language and 
culture. 

Champion, a teaching as- 
sistant for Wesch's class, said 
groups were systematically 
developed based on subsis- 
tence patterns Within these 
patterns emerged colonizer 
cultures that displayed aggres- 
sive or warlike tendencies. 

Additionally, the culture 
groups created trade networks 
with surrounding groups to 
exchange resources 

Wesch introduced the 
exercise in fall 2004, but 
Champion said the fall 2006 
simulation has been the most 
successful. 

"The way it felt was dif- 
ferent, and it felt like it went 
really smoothly, really well," 
Champion said. 

Wesch created the exer- 
cise as part of what he calls 
an "anti- leeching" philosophy 
on his weblog. 




Lyndsey Born K01I [C.l»h 
Sarah Zuiss, junior in alamantary aducation, waits next to the country Fersola so her country Eisenfaust can take it over during the world simulation project Wednesday 

morning at the Union Ballroom. 



If you line students up in 
rows and have them face the 
front of the room ... what they 
learn is how to listen lo the 
authority and how to repeat 
what the authority says," he 
said. 

The game contains real- 
world elements of inequality, 



power distribution, disease 
and war. 

"We have students re- 
searching like crazy - every- 
thing about the world Some- 
thing comes up in the world 
simulation, and they want to 
know how it relates to the 
real world," Wesch said. 



Each group has a power 
circle, and the power circle 
makes decisions about gov- 
ernment and taxation, with 
the riches of the land repre- 
sented by a box of Fruit Loops 
cereal. 

Stronger countries and 
colonizers gain points by pro 



ducing Fruit Loop necklaces, 
a rule (hat sometimes starts 
breakfast cereal wars 

Wesch said he hopes to 
take the exercise a step fur- 
ther during the May interces- 
sion by offering a class called 
World Systems He said he 
hopes more students will cre- 



ate larger and more dynamic 
cultures. 

Although the game is 
Wesch's brainchild, lie opens 
il for improvement by the stu- 
dents wlu> participate. 

"The real learning lakes 
place when the students are 
trying to revise il," he suid. 



Student's Antarctica trip to complete travels to all 7 continents 



By Mik. Ktlly 

KANSAS STATt COLLEGIAN 

While many students will 
spend the holiday break at 
home, one student will cel- 
ebrate down south - in Ant- 
arctica. 

Nick Sutcliffe, senior in 
marketing, will leave Dec. 
16 for a trek through South 
America, eventually arriving 
in Ushuaia, the southernmost 
city in the world. 

"This is a trip we have 
been planning for since last 
year at about this time," Sut 
cliffe said. "I'm very excited." 

1 lie Sutcliffe family, which 
includes Nick's parents foe 
and Rita Sutcliffe, has a pas- 
sion for traveling. In their 
travels, the Sutcliffes have 
been to six continents. 

"Ever since I was 18 



months old, I have been trav- 
eling internationally," Nick 
said. "I have developed life 
long memories, and the trips 
have brought my family clos- 
er together" 

The 21 -day trip begins 
when the Sutcliffes will fly 
to Buenos Aires, Argentina 
From there, they will fly to 
Ushuaia and board a cruise 
ship headed for the Drake 
Passage, where Ihe Atlantic 
and Pacific oceans meet. 

Highlights of the visit will 
include leaving the cruise 
boat on small, rubber zodiac 
rafts (o view the continent's 
vast wildlife and amazing 
scenery, Nick said 

"Since Antarctica isn't 
exactly a tourist destination, 
many of the people on the 
trip will be researchers or 
professionals who can give us 



personal insight," he said. 

Although they are traveling 
to the bottom of the world, 
the Sutcliffes said they are 
not worried about the cold, 

"December and January 
are the summer months in 
Antarctica, so the average 
high is about 28 degrees." |ue 
said "We plan to wear a basic 
ski outfit with layers under- 
neath" 

Antarctica is not a typi- 
cal tourist destination, but an 
increasing number of people 
visit the frozen continent 
each year 

"It's becoming more popu- 
lar than in past years." said 
Paul Christi of Expedition 
Trips, a travel service that 
provides cruises to Antarcti- 
ca. "In total, there are maybe 
20 vessels that tour the Arc- 
tic, so it's still very secluded " 



Because of his opportunity 
to (ravel the world at a young 
age, Nick said he wants a ca- 
reer that includes travel. 

"I would like to work lur 
the Department of State, pos- 
sibly in the held of foreign 
affairs," he said "I definitely 
want to continue to travel." 

Nick said his love of travel 
came from his father, who 
began his travels while in the 
Navy. 

"When 1 was in the Navy, 
I spent some time overseas, 
and (hat's where I really 
caugh( ihe bug." said ]oe, who 
is retired 

The Sutcliffes choose not 
to vacation in the same place 



twice. Some favorite family 
vacations have been cruises 
on the Amazon River in lira 
zil and on the Rhine in Ger 
many, and a month spent 
with a rented car in Austra- 
lia. However, lather and sun 
differ on their favorite excur- 
sion 

"I think the Greek Islands 
were amazing," Nick said. 
"There's just something amaz- 
ing ahiiiii the ocean, especial- 
ly in the Mediterranean 

"My favorite was our two 
safaris in Africa," |oe said. 
"The Zimbabwe trip slands 
out the most. However, we 
may have to change our minds 
after this Antarctica trip" 



The Sutcliffes do not plan 
to end their travels any time 
soon. Although they said 
they are still looking forward 
to Antarctica, Ihe family has 
begun planning multiple lu 
ture endeavors. 

"I would really like logo to 
India MfflMiay, but our nexl 
trip will be to Hie Galapagos 
Islands," [oe said 

"Once my wife and I are 
both ready, we plan In spend 
two months driving through 
Europr, giving time to really 
experience Ihe lueals That's 
one of the thing! ih.il we like 
best, getting to know I he lo- 
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OPINION 



Page 4 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Thursday, Nov, 30, 2006 



Cold front continues 



Allies betray more quickly than enemies; U.S. must beware of Russia's shady intentions 




KING 



Contrary to popular opinion, the 
Cold War did not end with the fall of 
the Berlin Wall. 

The strugjjle be- 
tween the United 
States, and the 
former Soviet 
Union is only on 
hold, emerging 
once again when 
the United Slates 
displays weakness in 
the world commu- 
nity 
Russia is attempting, with what 
little power it has left, to undermine 
the United States at every turn 

History is our best judge of Rus- 
sian military tactics According to 
Adam Zamuyski in his book "1812: 
Napoleon's Fatal March on Moscow" 
and Dunk an Anderson's "The Eastern 
Front: From Barbarossa to Berlin, the 
Campaigns of World War II" Russia 
used many similar tactics to defeat its 
enemies in two different conflicts. 

In both wars, the Russians retreat- 
ed with the appearance of weakness 
caused by opposing fortes 

Once winter arrived, the Russians 
quickly mobilized to cut off supply 
routes, leaving enemy troops cold and 
starving Russian troops would slowly 
pick at an enemy from behind until 
the opposition retreated 

The Russian defeat of French 
forces in 1812 reveals the lengths to 
which the Russians were willing to 
go to defeat an enemy As Napoleon 
approached Moscow, Russian forces 
began to bum the city to the ground 
When Napoleon reached Moscow, 
a majority of the city was reduced to 
rubble, leaving his troops with little 
to no shelter or other resources to 




survive the winter months 

History is our greatest tool in pro- 
viding insight as to how a country will 
act in the future After the collapse 
of the Soviet Union, Russia's foreign 
policy and economic activities follow 
many of the same military tactics used 
in the War of 1812. 

After the fall of the Soviet Union, 
Russia retreated to its natural borders, 
thus releasing its hold on the satellite 
communist countries This mirrors the 
1812 retreat from Moscow. 



Quick to extend its influence into 
newly formed democracies, the United 
States has worked with emerging gov- 
ernments in the Eastern Bloc region. 

During times of conflict, the United 
States military was called in to keep 
the peace in countries like Bosnia, 
Serbia and other territories of the 
former Yugoslavian region. 

The United Stales' increasing 
influence in the Eastern Bloc and 
the Middle East can be seen as an 
encroachment on territory once under 



Russia's sphere of influence. 

Recently, Russia has started fires 
itself in any entity that has increased 
tensions with the United States 

These scorching fires have been set 
in the U.N. Security Council. North 
Korea, Iran and many other Middle 
Eastern countries. The Jerusalem Post 
reported last week that Russia is pro- 
viding Iranians with the sophisticated 
Tor-M 1 air defense system, which can 
target up to 48 air targets (airplanes 
and helicopters) at one time. 



Infernos set across the 

globe by the Russians are designed to 

keep the United Slates in quicksand, 

sinking from superpower status with 

increasing speed as we fight the trap. 

Robert Greene's "48 Laws of Pow- 
er" states. "Be wary of friends - they 
will betray you more quickly, for they 
are easily aroused to envy ... you have 
more to fear from friends than from 
enemies." 

Wake up, America, our so-called 
allies are plotting our demise. The 
Cold War is not over; winter has just 
begun. 



Brett King is a junk* in political wenc*. Pleas* 
send commrnn to opinion a ipab.kut.edu. 



Discussing possibility of reinstating draft wastes Congress' time 




Have you ever heard the story of 
how a father punishes his son after 
the 9on is caught smoking a ciga- 
rette'' 

In order for the son to 
truly realize how disgusting 
smoking is, the father feels it 
is necessary to force his son 
to smoke an entire pack of 
cigarettes in one sitting This 
of course will turn the boy off 
from smoking forever 

This logic is insane, right'' 
Well, ladies and gentle- 
men, say hello to your newly elected 
Democratic Congress, Insane is 
just what these Democrats are 
Take Charles Rangel, a Con- 
gressman from New York, 
for example He is trying 
to punish Republicans 
the same way the dad in 
our story tries to punish 
his disobedient son. Rangel 
recently annum iced that when 
the Democrats officially take 



'* * 



CHUCK 

ARMSTRONG 



that will ultimately reinstate a mili- 
tary draft. He feels this proposal will 
generate discussion about the current 
war in Iraq, and hopefully 
cause Republicans to see the 
error of their ways. 

In fact. Democrats have said 
there is no real intent to try 
to pass this proposal. Nancy 
Pelosi, the House minor* 
ii\ kader and soon-to-be 
speaker of the House, admit- 
ted this. 
"Don't worry," Pelosi said 
"The bill has no chance of passing." 

Itm why. Nancy, in the wide, 
wide world, would you want to waste 
valuable time on this discussion'' 

Roth Pelosi and Rangel feel 
Republicans have no idea of (he 
sacrifices made by soldiers and their 
families. The draft, in these politi- 
cians' opinions, would open the eyes 
of conservatives and make them 
realize how unjust the war in Iraq 
actually is. If the children of members 



control, he will propose legislation of Congress were subject to a draft, 



perhaps the members would decide 
the war isn't such a good idea, ac- 
cording to the reasoning of Rangel 
and his fellow Democrats 

"It's not about a draft. It's about 
shared sacrifice for our country," 
Pelosi said. 

What seems so insane about this 
whole thing is that those now making 
sacrifices for our country overseas 
enlisted by their own free will They 
were not forced to join the armed 
forces. You know what you are get- 
ling into when you enlist with (he 
Army or any other military force ^ 1 hi 
can blame President Bush for the war 
all you want, but you cannot blame 
Bush for men and women enlisting 
in the military Congress does not 
need an eye-opener about the hor- 
rors of war, and it does not need to 
be scolded for something it cannot 
control - the people who enlist in 
the armed forces Besides, the only 
reason we would need a draft would 
be if our armed forces are lacking in 
numbers, and that is not (he case 



Even to bring up this idea of a 
draft in Congress is a waste of time 
and money 

According to uww.usg,ovinfo. 
about. corn, the current salary for 
members of the House and Senate 
is $165,200 per year (Ol' Pelosi gets 
about 20 grand extra). Is this a wise 
use of taxpayers' money"* Is this what 
Congress should spend valuable time 
discussing ' Perhaps instead of bring- 
ing up a bill that even its supporters 
know will fail, our Congress could 
UK thai lime to propose something to 
better our country 

Oh, Democrats, always on the de- 
fensive and trying to accuse Repub- 
licans of silly things. Let's not waste 
our time discussing something we 
don 1 want lo pass There's plenty of 
other, somewhat beneficial ways we 
can waste our time for the next two 
years. 



Chuiti Armstrong is a junior in English eduution . 
Mease send (omments to opinion ° ifnlb.kw.tdu 



Collegian 

imlly Lawranta I TDII0* IN (Kill 

Harry Fttthar | WtttlW, IDIM 

Laafin$uliafl|NfffSIDITON 

Abby Brown back | (Of* (XIII 

MaganMotar) ,i, jl . IIHtM 

Krfitan Roderick | < UrlPUS EDITOR 

Anthony Mandril* | ',PG«t'. I QttW 

Anft.ll. Lawlail I I Ml IBGl (DltOI 

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ZacharyT. Eckati | r«l",INI»H0N (DII0N 

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Logan C. Adamt | i'ijfm< [OIIOB 

Kally Witliami | II UMl.lt 

Courtney Steypan | tv I *l) MAN AMU 



WRITE TO US 

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They can be submitted by e-mail to Itttennnpub. 
kuifdu, or in person to Kedzie 1 16. Please include 
your full name, year in school and major. Letters 
should be limited to i SO words. All submitted 
letters may be edited for length and clarity. 



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An editorial selected and debated by the editorial board and written after a majority 
opinion is formed. This is the Collegian's official opinion. 

Editors share favorite winter activities 



As the temperature dips 
down to glove and scarf 
weather for more than 24 
hours, we share our favorite 
cold weather activities. 

Leann Sulzen - 1 really 
hate winter weather, so 1 pre- 
fer to stay inside and bake for 
the holidays. 

Annette Lawless - Snug- 
gling up to someone warm, 
preferably a tall, dark, hand- 
some gentleman. 

Zachary T. Eckels - Start- 
ing fires - the legal kind. 

Kristen Roderick - My 
favorite winter activities hap- 
pened when my family and 
I would visit Colorado. We 



would either go skiing, ice 
skating or just sit by a warm 
fire. It's cold, but spending 
time with my family is worth 
it. 

Kerry Fischer - 1 love to 
curl up with a blanket, a cup 
of tea and a great book. What 
better way to escape the cold 
than by immersing yourself in 
a great story? 

Anthony Mendoza - Brav- 
ing the 70-degree weather by 
wearing a pair of shorts and 
a sweatshirt while playing a 
round of golf on Ihe Southern 
California golf courses. 

Emily l^iwrcnce - Going 
to the tree lot lo buy a real 



Christmas tree. 

Abby Brownback - Think 
good movie, fire in the fire- 
place, popcorn, steamed milk 
and friends: a perfect recipe 
for making the most of bitterly 
cold winter evenings, 

Megan Moser - I'm a big 
fan of decorating for Christ 
mas, indoors and out, I also 
like baking cookies when it's 
snowing. 

Steven Doll - There is 
nothing like starting a good 
ol' snowball fight with friends 
and then coming inside to 
relax with some hot chocolate 

Owen Kennedy - Writing 
my name in the snow. 



CAMPUS FOURUM 

395-4444 -or- 

fourum@ipub.ksu.edu 

The Campus Fourum is the Collegian's anonymous 
call in system The fouium is edited to eliminate 
vulgar, ractsl, obscene and libelous comments. The 
comments aie rwt the opmton ot the Collegian nor 
are they endorsed by the editorial staff. 

Where's a plate where racist nth kids and kids 
trom Kansas City can come together to betitlle 
women behind their backs? Oh, yeah. Fiji. 

Every time parking Maris give a ticket, God kills a 
kitten I hope you guys feel good about yourselves. 

Mm, that fed good. Thank you, Frank s mom. 

Have you played whh the Mfli yet? As In 

Nintendo Wii? 

I don't have good plasinoids — that's why I 
need tomatoes 

How does lonas Hogg have the right to say 
anything aboul 'the word"' Well I won't say it 
- - the N word 



Need more Fourum i? Co to www.k!tatttolky«m. 
ram for tti« hill version. 



i 



Thursday, Nov. 30, 2006 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Pages 



Ice rink in City Park provides after-school activity 



By Erie Davit 

KANSAS S1MK0LIE6IAN 

On Nov 15 of every year, 
an ice rink opens in City 
Park. 

Next to the band shell, 
there is a 50- by 80-foot rink 
where people of all ages can 
go to enjoy themselves. 

Admission and skate rent- 
al are $1 50 each. 

Adam Dolezal, director 
and supervisor of the ice rink, 
said the number of people al 
ihe rink depends on the day 

"We open during the week- 
days al 5:30 p.m., and we 
usually have a pretty strong 
after-school crowd," he said. 
"On the weekends, though, 
we average about 50 to 100 
people. 

"On Wednesday nights, we 
have ihree-on-three hockey 
games as well, but the people 
who play have to bring all 
their own equipment." 

The rink is open 3:30-8 
p.m. weekdays 

On weekends, the rink 
opens at 1 p.m. both days and 
closes al 7 p.m. Saturdays 
and 8 p.m. Sundays 

The after-school crowd 
can provide anywhere from 
three to 20 skaters. 

lo-.li Kindis a middle- 
school student in Manhat- 
tan, said he comes to the rink 
fairly often 



"1 really like to skale," 
Kindis said as he laced up his 
skates. 

His friend, Deron Ryan, 
an eighth grader, was skating 
fur the first time 

"I am a little scared to do 
this because I have never 
done it before." he said. 

But Kyan said he has en- 
joyed the skating he has done 
so far. 

The rink, which opened in 
1982, has operaed annually 
ever since. 

The rink opens every year 
on Nov. 15 and closes March 
4 

The rink is open every 
day and is a favorite spot for 
many students and families. 

The rink can be reserved 
Inr special events for $25 per 
hour for any number of peo- 
ple 

However, each person still 
pays the cost of the skale 
rental. 

"We had a couple of fra- 
ternity guys come in here the 
other day to rent our rink out. 
They were organizing some 
sort of date party," Dolezal 
said. 

Those who are interested 
in renting the rink should 
call the city office to make 
arrangements 

Lessons are available to 
those who need them. Adult 
lessons are S25 for six one- 




Philip Thuml, 12, skates around the ice rink in City Park Wednesday evening. The ice rink opened Nov. 1 5. 



hour sessions, and children's 
lessons are $20. Information 
for both can be obtained 
by calling the city office al 



(785) 587-2757. 

In addition to the fun, in- 
juries sometimes occur al the 
rink 



"The mosl serious injury 
we have had was a grandfa- 
ther came in. tried to do some 
Irieks, and fell and broke his 



St«v*n Doll ('.Hi (l;an 



hip," Dolezal said 

"But most of the injuries 
can be fixed with a Band- 
Aid" 



STAMP | Collector will continue hobby, pursue additional awards j NUTCRACKER | Ballet troupe 



Continued from Page 1 

error stamp that helped me 
win the gold," he said 

There are more than 800 
members in the American 
Association of Philatelic Ex- 
hibitors, which is a national 
organization for people who 
compete. Lindemulh has been 
part of Ihe group for 30 years 
and is a National Organization 
Charter member. He also has 
been a part of the American 
Philatelic Society, which he 
said is lb t- biggest stamp collec- 
tor organization in the United 
Stales, for the past 50 years. 



Lindemulh has befriended 
many people through this hob- 
by, including Manhattan resi- 
dent Lejuan Shrimplin 

The two were in the same 
local philatelic society and trav- 
eled lo Chicago in the 1980s 
for an international show. 

"He was one of the very 
knowledgeable people in the 
stamp group thai we had here." 
Shrimplin said. 

She said she collects stamps 
because of their history. 

"Why did they issue this 
stamp and how was it print- 
ed?" she said. 

People who want lo start a 



collection should Find B source. 
Lindemulh said When he was 
beginning his collection, his 
source was the controller's of 
fice Office staff gave him the 
envelopes they received so he 
could go through the stamps. 
In ihis mail he found a 20-cent 
Stamp provided a key addition 
to his competition collection. 

Lindemulh said collecting 
reminds him of his work 

"One of the things a,-, an 
adult thai I like uboul collect- 
ing is thai there is a lot of print- 
ing," he said "It is similar lo 
my work, and I like to do the 
research 



Because the collection I 
have is from die '80s, there 
isn't a lot of literature on it s< I 
I'm helping to write the litera- 
ture thai will be read 1 00 years 
Irom now" 

Lindemulh will now com- 
pete for the Reserve Grand 
or Grand National award. He 
said he hopes to compete in 
Ihe Champion of Champions 

I think that for anybody 
who collects something, it's 
the thrill of the hunt." he s.iul 
"learning about your hohhy 
.mil meeting other people who 
share the same interests and 
stories" 



ADVICE | Slow advertising growth ,TiVo hinder corporation's business 



Continued from Page 1 

in strategic planning for its 
readership. 

"We're beginning to focus 
on the growing Hispanic mar- 
ketplace and the next genera- 
tion of readers, which are sons 
and daughters," he said. "We 
focus primarily on won km 
whose main focus is caring for 
(heir families and developing 
themselves' 

Lacy said the corporation's 
strong presence on the Internet 
generates advertising revenues.. 

However, despite its suc- 
cess. Meredith Corporation 
has seen its difficulties, 

"A large challenge for us 
has been slower magazine ad- 



vertising growth," Lacy said. 
"There has been an industry- 
wide circulation weakness. 
Twenty years ago. ihe average 
woman made three trips to the 
grocer} store ever} week Now 
she makes about 8 This affects 
us al the newsstands," 

He said the corporation also 
faces pressures from paper, 
posting and printing expenses 

■Dealing wild the Post Of- 
fice in a monopoly." Lacy said. 
"We're expecting that ii will 
cost SI million more in postal 
costs in 2007 due to postage 
cost increases" 

Lacy said TiVo presents an 
other challenge for the corpo- 
ration, because it allows people 
to skip commercials. 



"Many people don't even 
bother to watch the commer- 
cials we produce anymore," he 
said 

Lacy ended his k-clm 
Il-smiiis learned in his en i 

I always tell students to 
just relay lake a Step hack, 
and gel an entry-level posi- 
tion," he said "Gel a position 
with health insurance, because 
you'll be kicked off your par- 
ents' 

"Who would have thought 
after graduation Irom l< Stale 
I would end up here, runtime 

a media company? A dqp 
K-siate will make you ntccm 
fill." 

Lacy uSd most K- Stale stu- 
dents come from families wilh 



high ethical values 

' N ev e r compromise your 
values." he said. "You always 
hear ahoul tragedies where 
people gave up on their white, 
which has hurt innoceni peo- 
ple No mailer where you are, 
you can never earn CllOUfJl 
money foi it to be worth shar 
ing a jail cell wilh your boss oi 
co-workers" 

Many students I on mi I lit 
lecture worthwhile. 

"I came for extra credii for 
a class hut 1 actually found it 
lo be really interesting,' Chel- 
sea Slroh, senior in hnsim M 
management, said I enfOfWJ 
hearing about ihe problems 
with TiVo and how il will take 
over advertising 



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modernizes classic holiday piece 



Continued from Page 1 

used to seeing an older. Vic- 
torian setting in The Nut- 
cracker.' bul this performance 
will bring alive the An Deco 
dreamscapes of the '30s." 

In this performance, Artis- 
tic Director Rodney GustafHMI 
tries lo infuse new wil and 
style into "The Nutcracker." 

"This show will be very 
glamorous and glitzy," Jackson 
said "For example, instead of 
a rat king, this show has ral 
king gangsters," 

State Street Ballet, based 
out of Santa Barbara, Calif, 
is a traveling company dedi 
caled in bringing new work 
in dance while preserving the 
classics. 

The company, which began 
in 1994, consists of lb profci 
sional. international dancers 
from such place* as Kussia and 
Germany Regarded highly hv 
ihe Los Angeles Times lor its 
high energy and exceptional 
choreography, the company's 
Midwestern lour of "The Hoi 
lywood Nutcracker" will con- 
tinue until Dee, 5. 

Although he is looking for- 
ward to ihe performance, one 
K Siaic student remains skep- 
tical about the modern inter- 
pretation 

"It's a good holiday play, 
and it encompasses a lot of 
audiences,' Andy Le Valley, 
junior in English, said "I'm 



looking al il wilh an open 
mind. II could be cool if it 
turns oul. bul t can see a ren- 
dition going downhill." 

However, other students 
said the true nalure oi ■The 
Nutcracker" will he shown, 
regardless of ihe changes 

"Every ' Nutcracker* has 
unique and different poriray- 
als of (he music through Ihe 
choreography," Anna Quisin 
berry, junior in mass commu- 
nications, said 'I wai in The 
Nutcracker' for lb years, so 1 
love how I can relate to (lie 
dancers and the story thai is 
being told." 

Tickets for Friday's perfor- 
mance can be purchased by 
visiting the McCain Box Of- 
fice 11 a.m. lo 5 p.m or hy # 
calling the office al 1 |7M) 
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World AIDS Day 

December 1st 

Events for the week. 

November 27 -30: 

AIDS information table sponsored by 
SHAPE and Lafene Health Center 
"What's Your Sign?" t-shirts for $10 
K-State Union, 1 1 :00 am - 1:00 pm 
Nov 27 - Courtyard 
Nov 28, 29 & 30 - Food Court 

December 1: 

- AIDS Walk - Bosco Plaza at 4:45 pm, 

Ends at Varney's No fee. Hot chocolate and cookies 
(Thanks to Varney's, Bluestem Bistro & Planet Sub.) 

- Quilt piece dedicated for the AIDS Memorial Quilt. 

December 2: 

- Art AID - Art auction in Union Ballroom, 6 - 9 pm 

Call Health Promotion. 785 532 6595, for more info or check 
website: www k-state edu/lafene/SHAPE/AIDSday 06 htm 




provided 



the 




\ 



f 



I 



Page 6 

Teams must 
earn berth 
in playoffs 

The Bowl Championship Series is 
flawed. 

The end of the college football 

■ season is approach- 
ing quickly, as are 
debates on the per- 
fect playoff system to 
replace the BCS 
Every season, a 
computer ranks the 
top two teams in the 
CEORIQUE country based on 
HEMMING strategic formulas, 

— and this is how the 

national title game is decided 

I have wondered for years why a 
playoff system has not been estab- 
lished, ll would be much more fun to 
watch than waiting every Sunday to 
see who is ranked where when the 
BCS rankings are released. 

Fans would relish in the fact that 
the best teams in the country would 
have lo prove why they are the best 
by beating the other dominant teams 
in the country Plus, a playoff system 
would provide a lot of excitement for 
all die hard college fans. 

If I could create a playoff system, 
it would include eight teams - the six 
BCS conference champions and two 
al-large bids. It won't happen this year, 
but my playoff bracket would look like 
this if it were to happen 

The rankings are based on the 1-8 
seeds, not on the learns' current BCS 
rankings, and their records are current 
as of Thursday Not all of the confer- 
ence champions have been decided 
yet, and I have predicted which teams 
will win their respective conferences 

FIRST ROUND 

■ No. 1 Ohio State (12-0. Big 10 
Conference champions) vs. No. S 
Boise State (12-0, at-large) 

Boise Stale receives one of the at- 
large bids because it has an undefeated 
record and deserves a shot at the No. 
I team in the country The Broncos 
can't hang with Troy Smith and Com- 
pany, and the Buckeyes roll 38-21. 

■ No. 4 Florida (U-I, Southeast- 
em Conference champions) vs. No. 5 
Oklahoma (10-2, Rig 12 Conference 
champions) 

Oklahoma pulls the upset against a 
quality Florida team. A healthy Adrian 
Peterson leads the Sooners to a close 
24-21 victory over the Gators. 

■ No. 3 Michigan (II-l, at-large) 
vs. No. 6 Ijouisville (10-1, Big East 
Conference champions) 

Louisville would take down a 
Michigan team coming in with a 
letdown after the 4 1 -38 loss to Ohio 
State that cost the Wolverines a shot at 
the national tide. 

■ No 2 Southern California (10-1, 
Pacific 10 Conference champions) 
vs. No. 7 Wake forest (10-2, Atlantic 
Coastal Conference champions) 

Wake Forest gets in due to a win 
in the ACC Championship game 
against Georgia Tech, but the Demon 
Deacons don't have enough offense to 
hang widi USC. Trojans win 35-17. 

SEMIFINALS 

mNo. 1 Ohio State vs. No. 5 Okla- 
homa 

Against just another overmatched 
opponent. Ohio State rolls 28-7. 

■ No. 2 Southern California vs. No. 
6 t i>ti i\!>i lie 

Big surprise upset here, as Louis- 
ville wins in a 45-42 thriller 

NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP 

■ No 1 Ohio State us No 6 Louis- 
ville 

Crown Ohio State the national 
champs, because the Buckeyes will 
beat any opponent standing in be- 
tween them and the title 

College football fans would enjoy 
the season's close much more if it were 
to end like this. 

The two teams playing for the 
national title would earn a berth in 
the tide game because they proved 
they were the best on the field and not 
because of some computer ranking 



Mlp HmmH iMMftra prWJawMlw 



SPORTS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Athletic addition? 




Blog petitions to establish mens soccer as varsity sport 



By Daynt Logan 

KANSAS STATE CDUEGIAN 

A push is being made to bring 
men's soccer to the Big 12 Confer- 
ence. 

The push is spearheaded by a 
blog created to spread the word 
about men's soccer and to give peo- 
ple a chance to sign a petition ask- 
ing the athletic directors of the Big 
12 to sponsor varsity programs 

According to the blog, which 
can be found at bigl2menssoccer 
blogspot.com, the Big 12 is doing a 
disservice to potential student ath- 
letes who want to play soccer close 
to home. 

The Web site lists more than 60 
players from states within the Big 
12 who have been forced to play at 
other schools. 

Many players on the K-State 
Men's Club Soccer team have given 
up their dreams of playing college 
soccer to attend school closer to 
home, said Malt Campbell, senior 
in mechanical engineering and club 
president. 

So why isn't men's soccer a var- 
sity sport in the Big 12? 

"One reason may be Title IX," 



Campbell said 

Title IX mandates that schools 
must provide opportunities for ath- 
letic participation for both men and 
women proportional to the under- 
graduate population, said Laura 
Tietjen, associate director of athlet- 
ics for K-State. 

While it would be possible for a 
school to comply with the legisla- 
tion without adding a new women's 
sport, it is difficult (or most universi- 
ties, Tietjen said. 

"Most institutions would feel 
they have lo add a women's sport 
with a men's sport," Tietjen said. 

The blog suggests K-Slate could 
comply with the legislation by add- 
ing women's soccer, too. 

However, many other schools al- 
ready struggle to comply with Title 
IX and would find adding another 
men's sport a daunting lask, Tietjen 
said. 

K-State has not added a men's 
sport since the 1970s. 

"We want to make certain we 
provide the best opportunities for 
the student athletes we currently 
have," Tietjen said. 

Soccer's relative unfamiliar- 
ily might be another reason for not 



bringing it to the conference. 

"Soccer's still a new phenome- 
non in our country," Campbell said. 
"There's not as much support (for 
soccer) as other sports, but if we 
had a sanctioned NCAA program, 
we would see more" 

The decision, however, is not up 
to the NCAA or even the Big 12. 

"The Big 12 Conference does not 
determine what sports are brought 
in," said Dm Hancock, associate 
commissioner of championships for 
the Big 12. 

Rather, the universities decide 
individually what sports to offer. 
The Big 12 only gets involved once 
at least six teams participate in a 
sport, which then makes the sport 
eligible for the awarding of a Big 12 
championship,, Hancock said. 

Whatever the reason, men's soc- 
cer faces an uphill battle toward be- 
coming a varsity sport in the Big 12. 
But if it is introduced at some point, 
Campbell said he is confident it will 
be a hit. 

"If one school gets it," Campbell 
said, "all would catch on." 

Tim Weiser, K-State's director of 
athletics, was unavailable for com- 
ment. 



Wildcats de-clawed by Bears 



By Nick Dunn 
KANSAS STATE (01 1 tCIAN 

K-State coach Bob Huggins sat 
with his head in his hands and 
seemingly didn't want lo look up 
as his team approached the bench 
for a timeout 

This probably wasn't what he 
had hoped for when he agreed to 
come to K-State. 

At the time, the Wildcats were 
trailing California 48-32 with 
11:53 remaining in the game 
Eventually Huggins looked up 
and went to talk with his Wild 




cats, but judging by the result 
of the contest, his words didn't 
help. 

K-State (4-2) was dominated 
78-48 by the Golden Bears (6-1) 
Wednesday in Haas Pavilion in 
Berkeley, Calif 

Freshman center Jawa Bennett 
used his 7- foot -3 frame to tie a K- 
State record with six blocks, and 
Cartier Martin scored 16 points, 
but it wasn't nearly enough for 
the Wildcats 

California used a balanced of- 
fensive attack to shoot 27-of-60 
from the field 

Three players scored in double 
figures, led by forward Ryan An- 
derson with 15 points on 6-of-10 
shooting. 

The competition was close for 
the first part of the game, but the 
Bears used a 15-2 run over the fi- 
nal 7 1/2 minutes in the first half 
to go into the break with a 37-23 
lead California's fast- paced of- 
fense created a lot of easy inside 
shots 

Anderson was a perfect 4-of-4 
from the field in the first period to 
lead all scorers with nine points 

K State opened the second 
half with a brief run in an attempt 
to make things interesting. After 
Bennett tied the record with a 



block on the Bears' DeVon Har- 
din, senior guard Lance Harris 
raced down the court to score and 
was fouled 

Harris' free throw made it 37- 
28, but that was as close as the 
Wildcats would get The Bears 
responded with an 11-2 run to 
break the game wide open. 

Harris and Martin were the 
only players to score more than 
four points for the Wildcats, with 
16 and 14, respectively. Junior 
forward David Hoskins was held 
scoreless. 

Freshman Luis Colon was 
ejected with 6:32 remaining in the 
game after he punched Califor- 
nia's Taylor Harrison in the back 
of the head. 

K-State moved to 2-14 in non- 
conference road games dating 
back to the 2000-01 season. The 
Wildcats dropped their first game 
ever to California and now hold 
a 5-1 series advantage since the 
first meeting in 1951, 

After going 2-8 on the road last 
season, K-State is now 1-2 away 
from Manhattan in its first season 
under Huggins. 

The current road trip continues 
Saturday when the team travels to 
Fort Collins, Colo , to face Colo- 
rado Stale 



Thursday, Nov. 30, 2006 

1-MINUTE 
DRILL 

Staff Reports 




VOL | Spieqelberg named CVU 
National Player of the Week 

K State setter Sttcey Sptegefcerg was 
named the (otagute Volleyball Update National 
Player of the Week in an announcement on 
Tuesday afternoon. It is the first national weekly 
honor for a Wlhkat since Sept 27, 1999, when 
Dawntady earned the AVCA National Player of 
the Week. 

for the week, Spiegelbefo, tallied 95 assists 
(1357 apq). 18 digs (2.57 dog), lOWHs (1.4 J 
kpg), nine service aces (1.29 sapg) and seven 
blocks (1.00 bpg). K-Slate hit .309 (or the week 
with 1 13 Mis, legistered 27 total team blocks 
and tallied 24 service aces. 

In Wednesday's 1-1 win m Lubbock, 
Spiegel berg dished out a match-high 58 
assets, tallied 10 digs, recorded a match- and 
career -high five service aces, taHied five kilts 
on a .556 rutting percentage with zero attack 
errors and added in lour blocks It was the 11th 
double double of me season (or the junior from 
Overland Park, Kan , and (he 20* erf her career. 

In Saturday's 3-0 win over Kansas in 
Aheam Field House, SpiegcHberq dished out 37 
assists, registered eight digs, lumped into the 
attack herself with five kills on a 500 hitting 
percentage, dropped in (bur service aces and 
aided the defense with three blocks. 

During the week, she became just the third 
player in the 32-year history of K-State volley- 
ball to record a quadruple-triple for a season, 
surpassing triple digits in assists (1,415), digs 
(249), bkxks (107) and kills (107) 



TRK | Wildcats sign 5 athletes 
to National Letters of Intent 

K-State track and field has signed five 
athletes, three female and two male, lo 
National Letters of Intent in the early signing 
period. The new additwre are Aigafobuste, 
Michael Healey, Boaz Lalarvg, Lauren Lucas and 
Sydney Messick 

Grabuste rs a combined events athlete 
wrth International experience, finishing ninth 
in the heptathlon at me 2006 World Junior 
Championships in Beijing. The product of 
Rezekne. Latvia, has personal bests of 5,443 
points in the heptathon, 3,935 points in the 
pentathlon, a distance of 19-09 SO in the long 
jump, and a time of 14 06 in the 100-meter 

MM 

Healey joins the Wildcats from Katy, Texas, 
and Cinco Ranch High School. He is the ihml 
Cougar to sign with K-State in the Ian three 
years, joining Scott Sellers and Oenise Baker, 
Healey has a personal-best clearance in the high 
jump of 7-00.00. 

Lalang is an accomplished distance runner 
from f imbofoa, Kenya, who finished third at 
the 2006 Kenyan Junior Championships in the 
1,500-meter run with a clocking of 3 42.20. He 
also b ranked 18th on the World Junioi rankings 
in the event 

Lucas is a native of Round Rock, Texas, who 
competes in the pole vault. She has registered a 
personal-best clearance of 1 2-01.00. 

Messkk, a product of Topeka's Seaman 
High School, was the 2006 Kansas 5A State 
Cross Country champion. She notched a time of 
14:59 on the 4K track at Ron Rock Farm 

ft Slate will open the 2007 indoor track 
and field season Dec 8-9 with the Carol 
Robinson Winter Pentathlon and KSU All 
Comers meet in Aneam Field House 



Associated Press 

BBM | Lachey introduced as 
part-owner of Tacoma Ranters 

1AC0MA, Wash— former 
"Newly wed" Midi Lachey announced a 
new union Wednesday — and no, it has 
nothing to do with 
Jessica Simpson 

Lachey was 
introduced as a pan 
owner of the Tacoma 
Rainiets, the Triple A 
affiliate of the Seattle 
Mariners. Before 
Wednesday, Lachey 
had no connection 
with the waterfront L«h«y 

city 30 miles south of Seattle, other than 
occasional performances at the nearby 
Tacoma Dome 

Now, he's part of the Schlegel Spons 
Group based out of Dallas, and a one-third 
owner of the Rainiets 

Lachey 's involvement in the owner- 
ship group wasn't originally announced 
when word leaked of the Ramiers sale 
in July That was by design, says Kirby 
Schlegel, hoping the public relations pop 
of announcing lachey's involvement on 
Wednesday would boost interest in the 
Rainier! 




mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 



mmmmmmm 



CLASSIFIEDS 



To place an advertisement call 



Mil ■ I I I II 

l« a :: ■JJ_ ■■ 

LET'S RENT 




ONE-BEDROOM NO 

smokers 102) Fremont 
1385 utlllllem included. 
January lease Monday - 
Friday 785-776-4805 




fouh-beoboom. tm 

bath Fenced yard 

enrage Pels oh 
785317-7713 



CLASSIFIED ADS 

LET THEM WORK FOR YOU 

Kansas State collegian 

103 Kedzie • 785-532-6555 




Bulletin Board 



15X80 THREE-BED 

ROOM. Iwo bath Viiry 
race Please cat), 

785-484 2883, leave mes- 
sage Must sell 1 




LEARN TO FLY' K Stale 
Flying Club has live air 
planes and lowest rales 
Ca« 785-776-1744, www- 
ksu edu/Ksfc 




Lost and found ada can 
be placed free lot three 
days. 

FOUND I POD oft cam 
pus Call to describe 
913 526-9175 




Housing Real Estate 




Manhattan CITY Ordi- 
nance 4814 oi lures ev- 
ery person equal opportu- 
nity In nous i ngwithout dl s- 
h net i on on account of 
race, sei, (ami Hal itatut. 
military status, disability. 

""I.yil.ii .Itj.j. cult*. M 

tional origin or ancestry. 
Violations should be re- 
ported to the Director of 
Human Resources at City 
Hall, (7851587-2440 




MANHATTAN CITY Ordi- 
nance 4814 assures ev- 
( •' y per i o n equa I oppo rto - 
ni ty in housing without dli- 
lincllon on account ol 
race sei, familial status, 
military status, disability, 
religion, age, color, na- 
tional of kg in or ancestry. 
Violations should be re- 
ported to the Director ol 
Human Resources at City 
Hall, (785)587-2440 

ONE OR TWO BE D- 
ROOMS available now or 
January 1 Only a lew loft, 
$295 and up. Hurry' Cap- 

i ■ Management 

785-3410686 

ONF [1EDROOM Close 
In campus. 1360 Avail- 
able December I si 
785-587 0399 

TWOBEDROOM ONE 
and one-half balti jpari- 
ment in quiet neighbor 
hood Available Jan 1 
1420 Beecnwourt Ter- 
race 1710/ month 785 
341-9898 rosswll- 

opoglepages com 

TWOBEDROOM. ONE 
balh. short leim possible 
Spacious CiCo Park 

m Affj 0M MM 

air Water/ trash pMd. 
Deck, on si reel parking 
No pels Available Jan- 
uary S525 
765-5 3 7-8420. 
78S-34 1-5346 

TWO BEDROOM' ONE 
balh Townhouse 1850 00 
new construction Also 
two- bedroom/ two bam 
apartment near the man. 
call Wildcat Property at 
785-537-2332 



FEMALE ROOMMATE 
needed lor tour-bedroom 
house (3507 month plus 
oieclncily. gas, SBC 
Ouiel nice house, maior 
appliances included 

785-587-9207. 
785- 230 3008 

FFMAIE ROOMMATE 

n. ..:. , immedialely 

Clean newly remodeled 
three -bedroom, two balh 
house, garage available 
washer/ dryer Call 
785-820-7612 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
warned lor I hree- bedroom 
house $300. utilities paid 
Call 785-537-4947 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted who loves pets 
and is neat, quiet, and re- 
sponsible Rent $310' 
month including ulilllies 
Private bath Fwsl month 
free with January start 
Call 785-537-8807 tor de 
I ails 

FEMALE ROOMMATE'S) 
non- smoking, lo break 
train show horses etc 
lor renl Prefer veterinar- 
ian, animal science ma- 
|ors PO Box 1211, Man 
haltan KS 66505 

FFMALE STUDENT lo 
share new home with re- 
tired KSU faculty in return 
tor household chores 
785-539-6872 

RESPONSIBLE ROOM- 
MATE wanted Ouiel 
neighborhood two miles 
from campus Washer/ 
dryer No pels S275' 
month plus one forth ulili- 
lies Kelly 785-565-9)36 

ROOMMATE: NEEDED 

£325 per month, plus unti- 
tles. Across street Irom 
campus. off- street park- 
ing Available January 
2007 August 2007 
763-439-8926 

ROOMMATE WANTED 
tor a Iwo- bedroom house 
An appliances supplied 
Call 785-332-6152 ask lot 
Erica 

ROOMMATE WANTED 
lo* Spring Semester Nice 
house, close lo campus 
Pets 
620-382-7241 




TWOBEDROOM ONE 
balh S27S each, phis utili- 
ties One block Irom cam 
pus Need two spring sub- 
IIOIWII Call 

620-674-5900 ask lor 
Bryan Armendanj 

female Roommate 

wanted. January July 
Big live -bedroom duple* 




ONE-BEDROOM, walk 10 
class No drinking. Smok- 
ty Of patt 795-539 1554 

THREE. FOUR. FIVE. SIX 
PLUS BEDROOMS Look 
i' it) lor thai perfect home 
lo renl'' Great sulecnori 
and prices Capstone 
Management 

785-341 0686 

THREE- SFVENPFTi 
ROOM houses neat cam- 
pus tor neicl year June/ 
Augusl leases all have 
cenlral air furl k lichens, 
and washer/ diyer Call 
now lor best selection 

785-341-1897 

two RE P ROOM 
HOUSE Available Jan- 
uary 1 2007 Close to 

ii' i , N. i • i ' 

785-539 1975 Of 

' -1465 



ofl-streel parking Beauli- 
ful place, wonderful room- 
mates Call Courtney 
3 1 6-2 10-5975 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 
needed for two-bedroom, 
two bath apartment 
Brand new Washer/ 
dryer Walking dislance to 
campus 785-S45 5106 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 
ajfjjrjajd immediately 

Close lo campus, off- 
slreei parking 1400 a 
month utilities included 
913-9610673 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 
needed spring 2007 
semester $330' month 
Available January May 
NkW, newer, three bed 
room house built 1997 
785 221-2282 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 
needed Renl $255 plus 
ulHMtos. 08 -si reel parting, 
washer' dryer, no pels, no 
smoking. lour bedroom 
house Katie 

785-230-7266 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 
wanted lo share lour -bed- 
room/ two bath apartment 
First month tree, 1315' 
monlh Available now 
through July 2007 
907-232-480t 



MAI E SUBLEASE 

wanted for January 2007 
to August Close to cam- 
pus/ Aggieville $290 plus 

utilities Call 

913 775-2083 

MALE SUBLEASER 
needed in January $300 
per month, plus one-third 
ulilities Three-bedroom, 
two balh Call 
7S5 342-?932 

MALE SUBLEASER 
needed Spring 2007, 
close lo campus $300 
per month plus one -half 
ulUitres Please call Bran- 
don Bayless 
765-230-0512 

MALE SUBLEASER 

wanted Close lo campus 
washer and dryer four- 
bedroom, rent $370 
Needed by January. 
7S5-282-OB99 

ONE -BEDROOM NICE 
apartment, three minutes 
from campus No pets 
$450 per month Call 
913-834-0874 available 
December lo August 

oTSFbTBroom SUQ 

LEASE Rent reduced 

Pels allowed Available 

December 20 
316-617-5662 

ONE-BEDROOM WITH a 
full bath available in a two- 
bedroom apartment Fur- 
nished, cable No pets 
Washer f dryer Only $375/ 
month. Immediately i 

ft', ii' i-ji I 

QUIET ONE-BEDROOM 
across Irom campus $500 
a monlh Water, gas and 
trash paid Available in 
January 785-3 17-2 186 

sTjbTeaSefP'TIIHSeT)' 

lot a six-bedroom house 
Close lo campus $260 a 
monlh plus one-smlh ol 
utilities January through 
May 913-709-2248 
SUBLEASER NEEDED 
for Spring 2007 semester 
$315 per month Four-bed- 
room apartment January 
rent paid 785-418 1778 

SUBLEASER WANTED 
as ■oon as possible Nice 
house close to campus 
$350' month (willing lo 
deal) • one-liflh utilities 
Call Standi at 

785-4480239 Of email 
bbutiard<j*ksu edu 

SUBLEASER WANTED 
lor Catholic women's 
house Two blocks Irom 
campus $310/ monlh in- 
cludes ulikties food. rem. 
Live in dorms' May work 

:, ii' . ,11 r ...... ,1 ■ 

SUBLEASER WANTED 
One -bedroom one bath m 
two-bedroom two balh 
apartment $380 pet 
month, furnished Avail- 
January 1 

785-479-1235 or II 
*33559ksu.tdJu. 

Sl.lHLEA.SER WANTED lo 
share two- bedroom 

house Clean, quiel neigh- 
borhood Washer' dryer, 
off street parking $400' 
month, utilities included 
913-656 1411 

SUBLEASER WANTED 
Clow to campus washer/ 
dryer included $285' 
monlh one-lourth utilities 
Pels ok Call 

785-275-1913 

SUBLEASERS NEEDED 
for January Two-bed 
room apartment close lo 
Aggieville and campus 
$400 plus utilities Call 
816 668 9223 Of 

913 709-6615 

SUBLEASERS NEEDED 
lor two-bedrooms in a 
four -bedroom house 

$325 a month 

620-338-3675 



Fmployment Careers 



Help Wanted 



THE COLLEGIAN cannot 
verify the financial poten- 
tial of advertisement In 
the Employment/Career 
claudication. Readers 
are advised (o approach 
any such business oppor- 
tunity wiih rea- 
sonable cau- 
tion. The Collegian urges 
our readers to contact the 
Better Business Bureau. 
501 SE Jefferson. 
Topeka, KS 88607-1190. 
(785)232- 0454. 



Clay County 
Medical Center 

Full-time position for 

nurse on the 7P-7A 

shift working three 

nights pet week. 

Shift differential and 

specialty differentials 

paid tor capability of 

working ICU, [R, or 06 

specialty areas. Paid 

continuing education. 

Low nurse to patient 

ratio with the help of 

an aide. Registered 

Nurse preferred. 

for more information 

about the Clay County 

Medical Center check 

us out at 

www.ccmcks.otg , 

Print an application or 

pick one up at the Clay 

County Medical Center: 

P.O. Box SI 2 

617 Liberty 

Clay Center 67432 

Post otter drug screen and 
physical required EOE 



SUBLEASERS NEEDED 
spnng 2007 lor Ihiee-bed- 
room one and one hall 
balh apertmeni one 
minute walk lo campus. 
$780 pet month or $260 
per person plus electricity 
Conlact dgrayu>ksu edu 
or 913-481-1334 

THREE ROOMS available 
for sublease in Ihree bed 
room, one balh tor Spring 
semester One block Irom 
Aggieville 917 Morn 
$330' month 

785 317 1263 

TWO FEMALE Suh 
leasers needed lor sin- 
bedroom house All bills 
Included <n rent $329 per 
month Call Lnidsey 
620-242 6451 



4 OLIVE'S WW Bar now 

hiring lunch cooks. Flexi- 
ble hours, competitive 
pay Apply m person 3033 
Anderson Avenue 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSIS- 
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sional learn as we intro- 
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US This challenging posi 
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Fulltime only opporturti 
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robs'wcivicotus com 

APPLICATION SUPPORT 
Analyst position available 
al Steel S Pipe Supply 
Position is responsible tor 
business process design, 
testing, training, and sup 
port Qualifications m- 
clude B S in business, 
computer science, or re- 
lated field Must have gen- 
eral knowledge of busi 
ness processes Inter- 
ested candidates should 
submit resume to Person- 
nel Department . App Sup- 
port Analyst. PO Box 
1688 Manhattan. Kansas 
66505 Equal Opporturnly 
Employer 

APPLICATIONS PRO 
GRAMMER position avail 
able at Steel & Pipe Sup 
ply Pnmary function is lo 
develop reports, applica- 
tions, and inlemel tunc 
iionakly and support 
server and PC hardware' 
software OuaMcatbns in 
elude Computer Science 
or telaled degree or five 
years equivalent ex pen 
ence Dels/led knowledge 
ol JAVA. C. or C*t pro- 
gramming iaguao.es and 
added plus Candidates 
should submit resume lo 
Personnel Department. 
Applications Programmer 
PO Bon 1686 Manhat- 
tan Kansas 66505 Equal 
opportunity employer 

BARTENDING 1 $300 a 
day potential No expen 
ence necessary Training 
piovKkil Call 

1 BOO- 965 6520 exl 144 



J) 

Hep Wonted 



CATTS GYMNASTICS & 
Dance in Wamego is seek- 
ing a dance instructor for 
taji tap & clogging 
classes and gymnastics 
coaches for recreational 
and Mam levels Please 
call 765-456-8468 tor addi- 
tional information, ask for 
Angie Curtis 

COMMUNICATIONS ANA- 
LYST position available al 
Steel S Pipe Supply Co 
Qualilied candidate wtll be 
able to manage IP and 
Legacy Phone Systems 
Candidal* win be respon- 
sible for managemenl of 
alt Communication con- 
tracts, maintenance con- 
tracts, and service con- 
tracts. Attention to detail 
and ability for thorough 
documentation is desired 
General IP networking ex- 
perience and willingness 
to learn new technology is 
required, Interested candi- 
dates should submit re- 
sume to Personnel Depart- 
ment. Communications 
Analyst PO Box 1688 
Manhattan. KS 66505 
Equal Opportunity Em- 
ployer 

CCVlK rJEEBED at Wash/ 
Community Care Home 
Competitive wage, flexible 
scheduling. u,ni,,./.i 
Nancy. Highway 99 and 
Westmoreland 
785-457-2801 

CREATIVE DIRECTOR 
Civic Plus is the nations 
IimiIimu BJOMldJM .:- ( i .iy 
County, and School web- 
sites This is a full-time, 
Manhattan based posi 
lion You will be in charge 
ol directing the creative 
process, including brain- 
storming with slatt. meet- 
ing wnh cuslomeis and 
providing the creative vi- 
sion necessary to give our 
customers outstanding 
and award winning web- 
sites Salary commensu- 
rate with experience Ben- 
atiis include heallh. den- 
tal paid holidays paid va- 
cation and 40 IK match- 
ing Email resume in Mi- 
crosoft Word or text for- 
mat lo iobsWcivcplus ■ 
com. include cover lotto i 
explaining your capabili- 
ties. 

EAR^^25O0t monlhly 
and more lo type simple 
ads online wwwdataen- 
irytypers com 
EARN $800 - ■ . . 
month lo drive brand new 
cars with ads placed on 
them www AdOnveTeam - 

. Mill 

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 
Manhattan Area Habitat 
for Humanity serves both 
the Riley County and Pot- 
tawatomie County areas 
in Kansas The Executive 
Director manages the affili- 
ate's dairy operations and 
resource development in- 
creasing lundraislng el- 
torts in order to sustain 
the organization as a vi- 
able community resource 
Supervision ol one part- 
Hme staff person also re- 
quired Responsibilities in- 
clude the implsmenlanon 
of policies procedures 
and actions as approved 
by the Board of Directors 
(and roccommend same} 
perseverance of public ac- 
countability, and providing 
assistance to committees 
(Church Relations Family 
Selection. Nurture. Devel- 
opment. Restore) Qualifi- 
cations Include a passion 
for Habitat for Humanity s 
mission, proven expen- 
ence in a non-profit organi- 
zation f administration 
grant writing, creating, and 
maintaining community re- 
lationships, fundraisingl: 
excellent interpersonal 
wntten and verbal skits: 
and the ability to handle 
multiple tasks, meet dead- 
lines speak pubkety, and 
participate as a team 
player A familiarity wrlh 
home construction is a 
plus Exceptional account- 
ing skills and finance un- 
derstanding are required 
This is a Ihreo-lourths 
lime position: compensa 
lion dependent upon quali- 
fications and experience 
Applications available by 
contacting JoAnn R Sut- 
ton. President by calling 
785-341-4225. email sut- 
tonwmhaks org, or by vis- 
iting the web al www man- 
hatianareahabilal org Ap- 
plications must mctude a 
minimum of three refer- 
ences Resumes and writ- 
ten correspondence 
should be mailed to 
JoAnn R Sutton, Presi- 
dent. 1800 Defthotm 
Drive Manhattan. Kansas 
86503 

fTEsT mana^mfM 

has a part lime leasing 
agent position available 
lor a busy apartment com- 
munity Qualified app* 
cants must have reliable 
transportation, a witkng 
ness lo work a vaned 
schedule It is required lo 
bo able to work fun lime 
from July 23rd through Au- 
gust 6th lor apartment 
turnover Please apply at 
our Chase Manhattan 
Apanmenl location, 1409 
Chase Place, (comer ol 
College and Claftin J No 
phone calls please Equal 
Opportunity Employer 




V 

Help wanted 



GRAPHIC DESIGNER 
CivicPlus is the nations 
leading provider ol city, 
county and school web- 
sites. Both full time and 
work-at-home (contract! 
positions are available 
Futt-IKrie benelits mctude 
health, denial paid holi 
days, paid vacation and 
401 (k) matching Email 
resume and design sam- 
ples to tobs^civicplus com 

HARRYS DAYTIME 

DISHWASHER NEEDED 

Shifts 10am 3pm on 
Mon-Wed-Fn anov or 
Tues-Thurs Some night 
and/ or weekend availabii 
ity Apply in parson al 418 
Poyntz Ave Good Pay. 

HE IP NEE"LnrD^oncrete 
mixer" dnvers full or part- 
time must have CDL lis 
cense call or stop by Val- 
ley Concrete Operations. 
22620 Highway 24 m 
NtM KantM 

785-458-6499 Free em- 
ploymenl drug screening 
Great for students looking 
foi pad- time work. 

KANSAS WHEAtTwST 
ing a part-time Records In- 
tern Requires knowledge 
of Microsoft Access Ex 
cellenl resume builder ' 
Send resume lo dpeter- 
sonftkswbeat com or 
Kansas Wheal. 217 South 
wind Place. Manhattan. 
KS 86503. by December 
ft. 2006 Equal Opportu- 
nity Employer 

MYSTERY SHOPPERS 
Earn up to $150 Expen- 

i -..r ...quired Under- 

cover shoppers needed lo 
Ridge retail and dining es- 
tablishments Call 
800-722-479) 



NETWORK TECHNICIAN 
Due to our recent expan- 
sion Networks Plus has a 
new opening tor a full- 
time Computer Network 
Technician in Manhattan 
Positive attitude, profes- 
sionalism, strong work 
ethic and one or more 
years of computer support 
experience or equivalent 
training is required E-mail 
resume to tobs r ?vnelwork- 
splus com in Microsoft 
Word or Text format 
Equal Opportunity Em- 
ployer 

PART-TIME Firm'.,,,- n, 
livery Positions Flexible 
work schedule, great pay 
Stop by A Full House. 601 
S 5ih Stioet. 

785-537-9088 

PART-TIME PERSON Al 
care attendant needed lor 
a 19 year old female 
Wishing, to abend Kansas 
Stale Ihis January Duties 
would include assisting 
dressing m ihe morning 
and evenings If inter- 
ested call 620-375 2200 

PROGRAMMER CIVIC- 
PLUS is Ihe nations lead- 
ing provider ol city, county 
and school websites Full 

- time position m Manhat- 
tan, Microsoft ASP or 
SOI experience required 
$14 50' hour plus health 
dental paid holidays, paid 
vacation ana 401(h) 
matching Email resume 
in Microsoft Word or toxl 
tormat to jobst'Vcivicplus - 
com 

HAW.) ALLS FORMAL 

Wear is looking lor a part- 
lime sales person with out- 
standing customer service 
skills Flexible hours greal 
starting wage and commis 
son program It you 
would like lo torn our team 
slop by and fill out an ap- 
plication at 100 Mantial 
Ian Town Center Mall 
785-770-9011 

SAIFH ASSOCIATE PrO- 
vide customer service in 
the Art' Technology de- 
partment Price and stock 
merchandise, ability to lift 
40 lbs , climb ladders and 
operate culling equip 
ment Position will also 
provide sales and service 
of ceil phone plans and 
computers' software Pref- 
erence will be given to 
candidates with back- 
ground or experience in 
art techniques/ supplies, 
architecture or engiiieei' 
ing Hours Saturday 2p m- 
8p m and Sunday 11am- 

- 5pm Pick up applica- 
tion at Vamey's Book 
Slote 

STUDENT OFFICE Assis 
tant needed m a fast- 

1>,H ill ..II. -II I'll)!' Ir.ltl.i 

business office Musi 
have good working knowl- 
edge of Word and Excel 
Musi be a sell -motivated 
quick learner with a good 
a Mention to details and 
proolreadmg Previous ol- 
fice experience highly pre 
lerred Apply in Kedzie 
103 and include spnng 
2007 schedule 

SYSTEMS ANALYST ,... 

sition available at Sleei & 
Pipe Supply Co Qualified 
candidate will be able lo 
accurately troubieshool 
hardware and software is- 
sues and provide detailed 
technical assistance to 
the end user for all PC 
and peripheral systems 
Cisco networking Mi 
crosofl Server, and 
VMWaie experience is 
preferable Two - Five 
years experience and or 
education in Server or Net 
work Management I* re- 
quired interested candi 
dales should submit re 
suitiu to Personnel Depart 
ment. Systems Analyst, P - 
O Boa 1688 Manhattan. 
Kansas 86505 Equal op- 
podumly Employe) 



V 

HetpWa>lt£0 



TELEPHONY TECHNI- 
CIAN The Phone Connec- 
tion is a fast growing 
voice networking (VOIP) 
company in need of Tele- 
phony Technicians in 

Sal Manhattan. 

Topeka and Kansas City 
Positive attitude, profes- 
sionalism, strong work 
ethic and one or more 
years of telephone or com- 
puter network support ex- 
perience or equivalent 
iMiniiMj is required Bene- 
fits include Heallh dental 
Paid HokdayB, Paid vaca 
ton Paid Tiammg and 401 
(k) matching E-mail re- 
sume to |obs iiJitpcks com 
in Microsoft Word or Text 
formal 

WEB DESIGNER Award 
winning advertising 

agency. Imagemakers, 
seeks tuH-lime web devel- 
oper' web designer Some 
training provided Apply at 
www wamegowork com 




Open Market 




FOR SALE. Sail water 
nanowrearh aquarium 
$200 or best otter Cal 
785-395-5074 

NEW 52-n>c:h RCA HOTV 
still in box $900 or best oi- 
ler 308-325-0668 leave 
message 




990 CHEVY Blazer 
LOTS ol recent work runs 
great i $2000 or Best Oder 
7B5- 226 1620 

FOR SAL^Tord^aurus 
2004 excellent condition 
Asking price $7,500 or 
besloHer 785-313-6366 
FlETIFilrgri FACULTY sell- 



mg low 
2000 Mirage excellent 
condition 38.800 miles 
Manual air-conditionei 
Nana $4200 

765-5327176 office 

785-776-9505 Home 

7m a rsoc im ksu edu 




Travel "Trips 



#1 SPRING Break Web 
site I Low Prices Guaran- 
teed Group discounts lor 
6i Book 20 people, get 3 
free trips' wwwSpring- 
Breakdiscounfs com or 
., ... ■(,; 

HON f MISS nut' Spring 
Break 2007 is approach- 
inr} and STS is offenng 
specials to this years 
hottest destinalionsi Call 
lor savings 

I -800-648-4849 or visit 
www stsltavel com. 



Got old 
stuff? 



in the 

Kansas State 

CoHElilAN 

103 Kedzie 

532-6555 



EM 




suldolku 



Fill in the grid mi tli.tt every row, 

every column, and every 3 x 3 box 

contains the digits 1 through 9 

with no repeals 



9 
1 5 2 



7 6 
3 



5 
1 2 



8 



6 1 9 
2 



Solution and tips 
at www.smloku.com 



$ 2 0FF 

any regular or large sub 



Deadlines 



Ga«if ied a* must be 
placed by noon the day 
before you want your ad 
to run. Classified diip lay 

ads must be placed by 
4 p.m two working days 

prior to the date you 

want your ad to run. 

CAU78S-532-6555 




Classified Rates 



1DAY 
20 words or less 

(1050 

each word over 20 

20( per word 

2 DAYS 

20 words or leu 
tl2Jf 

each word over 20 
2S< pet word 

3 DAYS 

20 words or less 

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each word over 20 

JOf per word 

4 DAYS 

20 words ot leu 
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each word over 20 
35c pei word 

5 DAYS 

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120.00 

each word over 20 

40< per word 

(consecutive day rate) 



To Place An Ad 



GoioKedzie 103 (across 

from the K State 

Student Union.) Office 

hours are Monday 

through friday from 

Sam to Spm 



How To Pay 



All classifieds must be 
paid in advance unless 
you have an account 

with Student 

Publications Inc. Cash. 

check, MastefCatd or 

Visa are accepted 

There is a $25 service 

charge on all returned 

checks We reserve the 

righuoedtt, reject or 

properly classify any ad 



Free found Ads 



As a service to you, we 

run found ads for three 

days free of charge. 



Corrections 



If you find an error in 

your ad. please call us 

We accept responsibility 

only for the first wrong 

insertion 



Cancellations 



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before your ad has 

expired, we will refund 

you for the remaining 

days. You must call us 

before noon Ihe day 

before the ad is to be 

published. 



Headlines 



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we'll put a headline 

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. 






ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT | SEX | FOOD | YOUR LIFE 

THE EDGE 




Stereot yp ically femininle color 
evbfcteS intd5ffinbk)LQ€ sfrengtb r n b 



fvH.ijmin» 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

. . 

Pink it the new black. 
The color pink his reinvented 
itself year after year, being used as 
more than a color to identify frilly 
and girly things , but also for political 
Stands, fashion, movies and musk 

Pink used to be viewed as a femi- 
nine color. 

Nasrina Evenstar, instructor in 
women's studies, said that pink has 
inherited a new connotation. 

"Pink used to be signify girlinew 
and weakness," Evenstar said. 

Evenstar said she used to refuse 
to wear pink, because it was toe 
girly, and she was rebelling against 
the stereotype. 

"Now I love pink I can still be 
strong and wear pink." Evenstar 
said. 

When taking a political stand 
and in campaigns, many women's 
groups have used the color pink 
and its connection to women as a 
strength not a weakness. 

The political action group 
CODEPINK is a women -initiated 
grassroots peace and social justice 
movement that seeks positive social 
change through proac- 
tive, creative protest 
and nonviolent direct 
action. Its goal is to 
redirect financial 
resources to health- 
care, education and 
life-affirming activi 
ties. 

Anedra 
Shockley, or- 
ganizer for 
CODEPINK, 
said pink was 
used because of 
its representa- 
tion of diplomacy, 
nurturing and calmness. 

Hie group is fighting for policy 
makers to possess these characteris- 
tics in their decisions on the war in 
Iraq, Shockley said, 

One of the most recognizable 
connections to pink in the media 
and retail stores is the pink ribbon 
that is the official symbol of breast 
cancer awareness. 

Evenstar said when she wears 
pink now, she thinks about strength 
and breast cancer survivors. 

There also are women's groups 
that use the color pink in defiance 
of the traditional meaning of the 
color, 

The Pink Panthers was a group 
in the early days of the gay libera- 
tion movement during the 1970s. 

"Think before you pink" is a proj- 
ect of Breast Cancer Action. 

Rebecca Parmer, communica- 
tions officer for Breast Cancer Ac- 
tion, said the organization is net for 
breast cancer awareness. 

"We don't use the term 'breast 
cancer awareness' Everyone is 
aware of breast cancer. There has 
been so much awareness already," 
she said 





) Mil' 

I fit 
I I | 

•I, 

, 

< II' * l IT \i 

I (I'll 

• Ill, 

»ll»t! • -H'lli I 

[ bf«f* 

I 
" i ■ f 

Parmer said action is needed now. 

She alto said she thinks people 
buy pink products believing they are 
contributing to the cause. However, 
many consumers who purchase 
these Items do not know how 
much money goes where. 

Farmer said the color pink 
Is traditionally feminine, and 
they use that connotation to their 
advantage. 

We don't srear 
or use pink rib- 
bons," Fanner 
said. 

The ac* 
cessory the or- 
ganization uaa 
instead of a pink 
ribbon ia a button 
with a white background 
and the words "cancer tucks" in red 
tetters. 

On a lighter side, the color 
pink Is and has been splashed 
all over pop culture. -i .■ 

From Pink Floyd to the -ZJr» 
single-named pop ringer Pink f 
to Jennifer Lopez's famous 
pink diamond engagement 
ring from Ben Affleck, pink J 
Is a significant part L. 

of American culture 
- "Pretty in Ptnk," 
"The Pink Panther,** 
The Ptnk Ladies, 
Pinky from the Ice 
Cube movie, "Next 
Friday," and Aretha 
Franklin, both riding 
in pink Cadillacs, and 
"Under the Pink" with Tori 
Amos. 

Rapper Cam'ron brought pink on 
to the hip-hop scene, and Victoria 
Secret's PINK line of lounge wear is 
flying off the racks. 

During the mid-1950s, anything 
pink was in: pink refrigerators, 
pink lipstick, pink poodle skirts and 
dress shirts, pink typewriters, ptnk 







automobiles and fink toilet paper. 
Rumor had it that people used pink 
light bulbs to flatter their complex- 
ion. 

Fifty years later, pink is still in. 
"Although pink cycles in and out 
of fashion, it never goes away," said 
Petri Barnes,; instructor of apparel 
textile*. 

When it comes to fashion, pink 
can even be more of a statement for 

men 

Barnes said the color pink is 
popular for men to wear in India 
but it not looked upon as highly in 
the United States. 

"Men in the United States wear 
pink for fashion, but it is not very 
often," Barnes said, 
-"v Many male correctional fa- 
\ cilities nationwide in the 
i V United Stalet have taken 
advantage of the calming 
effect of the color pink 
by painting the wells 
light pink, according an 
^_ ABC news report. 
When giving flow- 
ers, the chosen 
shade of pink can 
affect the mean- 
ing of the flow- 
ers given to loved 
ones. 

According to 

Bella Online, a Web site for 
women, pink roses signify elegance, 
gracefulness, refinement, gentility, 
style and poetic romance but are 
combined with fun and light-heart- 
edness. 

The combination of red and pink 
roses stands for strong romance and 
passion, dark pink roses are sym- 
bolic of thankfulness, and pale pink 
roses arc a symbol of joy and grace 



TtwPlnkMbbM Story 

taero*»igtoir*J<^MAMM(Jurw/July 
imtr»pWtrtbbmjymb(AKtr»l)«Bt 







! 



'■ 



I 



TVmer0r^i]*rWwijrris»mbot«niritrfs 
tourtoy came about in to huot leaps. 

The tra oouthI n 1979. when Penney 
lamgen, wfe of* hostage who had been 
taken in Iran, tied yetowrtbors around the 
(Net m her front vaid, dajnilng her desee to 
see her husband come home. 

Bewoye*nlatw,whBiAltr5*rtM5ts 
looked at the ^How ribbons that had been 
Rsunrdrt for soldiers fighting the Gulf War 

* ■ ' - J iUli i li Tirlj ■■,! In „..i. lil 

and turned me moon ongnt reo, oooea re 
spruced* up awl sent it onto the rational 
stage during (he Tony awards to represent 
*»se affected by AIDS. 

Ttestaywassetfortheevo'wirjnofthe 
Ixw oncer itorm The Komen Foundation 
has used the color pink since tetocerjtion 

.eaJTMaa) 

to 1950, the CJBfJtphw program wis 
■aww he d by twsman named FJtzabrth 
*tfi*W*vra^aC,,IUxTOTKattonil 
Race for fte Cure* Tnesurwrs wore 
buttons prtnwi si bud and whMe. Ozaberh 
moved to Houston, and Uen Harnett toot 
up where she left oft in late 1990 Bamett 
dewioped the survtot program to whfch 
pink continued to be the color the tOomert 
Foundation used to promote awareness and 
its programs, tt was during this time that 
8ameTt launched foe r^vtson for the 
survtvor nxognroon. 

In 1991, pM ribbons we* MM to 
sj BHjtjjtjsj and participants of the Somen 
New *A Qry Race tor the Cure* In 1992. 

AlexanrJraftJnney.ectacinchwfofSer' 
migaj|rK,w«r*dtopwtr<rrugaanrt 
second annual Breast Cancer Awareness 
Worth issue over the top 

She (leased a ribbon and enlisted cosmetics 
giants to attribute mem to New *rtoty 
stows. And thus, the birth of the pMt ribbon 1 




Thursday, Nov. 30, 2006 



HOROSCOPES 



Sagittarius 

(lta.22-Det21)r'Mjexhl*the 
abity to focus and nukedrnVuh 
professtonal matters disappear as 
rjuKxh/ as they appeared, You haw. great dbdpkf* 
and can set good examples In all areas of your We. 





Capricorn 



(Dec. 22 -Jan. 1 9) You wilt put 
your mind to wort to take care 
of any details you need to focus 
on today Problems and obstacles that prevtousry 
haw been confounding should find easy explana - 
tiom, your mmd worts well. 




Aquarius 



{Jan. 20 -Feb. 1*1 Vou have an 
appreciation for resocsistbilfhes, 
and you carry out your fair share 
jfrhevvcrtmrrwonVe.YouleeleiTKKioniltystabkt 
and that others around you are happy with their 
work and enjoy the challenges presented. 




Pisces 



(Feb. 19 -March 20) Some 
old habits can be realized and 
discarded today. Issues you can 
define tlearty.at this time will characterize your 
wort for this next year Take a step back and make 
peace with the past. 




Aries 

(March 21 - April 19) You are most 
persuasive with others, and a 
communication attempt with a 
drffkntt person is successful today. Your patience 
with the ekJerty is commendable, and you might 
decide to volunteer. 

Taurus 

(April 20 -May 20) Your work day 
is over before you are ready for it to 
end Vtstts with family ot friends are 
in order today: Digging Into the past for hints about 
the present and future uncoven many answers to 
questions mat have been on your mind 

Gemini 

fiM [May 21 -June 21) You might be 
on a holiday soon, and it is where 
your mind tends to move. Every 

true you trunk of items you might need for this 

hdtc^.wmememdownonakst 





^V' 



Cancer 



(June 22 -July 22) You could 
find yourself struggling to 
overthrow everything that Is 
dreamy ot imaginative today, perhaps even 
undermining your real dreams and Ideals 

Leo 

duty 23 Aug 22) Fortunately, 
work Is steady. Someone dose to 
you might be going through some 
important life changes now You will play a most 
Impcstartpantohowrworshemalursdeasionsas 
you will be available to listen 





Virgo 



[Aug. 23 Sept 22) toggling 
your professional and personal 
resporelMrrJes has been a at of 

a struggle today, you should see the energies move 

steadiy in a professional direction 




Libra 



(Sept 23 Oct 23) A special event 
today wW bring you a feeling of 
importance. You could be placed to 
charge of an Important miner in the worlrptace. This 
might be tnnporary, but the outcome wi depend 
on your attitude and your decisionmaking skUk. 

ft\ I Scorpio 

YY\€ (0a 24 -Hw. 21) Gathering and 
% . exchancang ntormation becomes 

*■ an Important part of your working 
We now .. an educational experience. 

Source: www dailytwtwapeuam 



BUTTERED | Running, Stupid 



■mwiMt' 

happened to you? 




WflM *»• *t a party, tmd some 

cop* showed up. So I took off rurs- 

mri0 and ran right into a tree. 




You 4o realize that you're 21 now 

and no longer have to hide when 

polios show up, right? 



I 




/^M< A N S A S STATE 

- Collegian 



wwwkstalecol9cgian.com 



Friday. December 1,2006 



INSIDE 

Mens and women's 
basketball both 
hit the court this 
weekend 

Sea Sport* Pag* 5 




Vol.lll.Na7l 



Footing the bill 



Health insurance plans 
offer students options 
in paying medical bills 





By Lwnn Sutzan 
KANSAS STATE COUKIAN 

About 17 percent of college stu- 
dents were uninsured in 2004, and 
these students account for about 10 
percent of the country's uninsured 
population, according to a December 
2004 article in University Business, 
a monthly magazine for college and 
university administrators. 

Many students are insured, cov- 
ered by their parents' policies that 



automatically drop them after gradu- 
ation or upon their 23rd birthday 

Kedric Elmore, senior in geology, 
said he was covered by his mother's 
insurance until he turned 24 He was 
covered last year when he worked 
as a school bus driver 
for Manhattan Ogden 
USD 383. However, 
Elmore no longer is a 
bus driver and is unin- 
sured because he cant 
afford it. 

Sometimes he 
does think about not 
being insured, espe- 
cially when he's sick, 
Elmore said. 

"There have been 
times when my moth- 
er says, 'Maybe you 



should go to a doctor,' but I say, '1 
cant,' because I'm not insured," he 
said. 

Although many students might 
be offered jobs with health benefits 
upon graduation, it would be wise to 
look into the options now 

listed below are three insurance 
plans, so you can find the plan that 
is right for you. 

STUDENT INJURY AND 
SICKNESS INSURANCE PLAN 

This plan, which is underwrit- 
ten by The MEGA Life and Health 
Insurance Company, is offered spe- 



cifically to students enrolled in any of 
the Kansas Board of Regents' univer- 
sities, including K-State. 

Classified as a preferred provider 
organization plan (PPO), this student 
plan allows those covered to see any 
doctor without a referral. However, 
it might call for a lower rate of reim- 
bursement if the doctor is outside the 
preferred network. 

This plan costs $876 per year and 
offers a deductible of $500. With this 
deductible, a person must pay $500 
in medical bills before the insurance 
company will begin to help with pay- 
ment. 

This plan has almost no co-pay- 
ment requirements, although there is 
a $5 co-payment on lab work. 

Although there are not many pro- 
cedures that require co-payments, the 
co-insurance for this plan can be as 
much as 25 percent for doctors who 
are considered part of this insurance 
provider's network of health care 
providers. Policyholders will pay co- 
insurance unless they have reached 
their out-of-pocket maximum. For 
this plan, the co-insurance begins 

See INSURANCE Page! 



Health insurance terminology defined 



■ Co-insurance: money an individual is required to pay 
tor services after a deductible has been paid. If s often 
specified as a percentage (for example, employee pays 
20 percent and insurance pays 80 percent}. 

■ Co-payment: predetermined flat rate individual pays 
for health care services, like doctor's visits, in addition to 
what Insurance coven. 

■ Deduct i We: the amount an individual must pay for 
health care expenses before insurance covers the cost 

■ LrfetfiM maximum: maximum amount a hearth 
plan will pay in benefits to an insured individual during 
the individual's lifetime. 



■ Out of pocket maximum: predetermined limited 
amount of money that individual must pay out of his or 
her own savings before an insurance company will pay 
100 percent of health care expenses. 

■ Preferred Provider Organization: doctors from 
a preselected group determined by the insurance 
company. Generally, insured members receive discounted 
rates by using selected doctors. 

■ Underwriter the company that assumes responsi- 
bility for the risk, issues insurance polities and receives 
premtums- 

Sourtt: (vww.neoftninsurarKe.0f5 



Pageant marks fraternity's centennial 



By Sheila Ellis 

KANSAS STATf COLLKIAN 

The men of the Kappa Tau chap- 
ter of Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity will 
have their eighth-annual Miss Black 
and Gold pageant at 7 p.m. Saturday 
in Forum Hall. 

This year's pageant theme, "Cen- 
tennial Woman," marks the 100-year 
anniversary of the national, histori- 
cally black fraternity 

This year is a very special year for 
us, it will be a huge celebration," said 
Brandon Clark, Alpha adviser of the 
Kappa Tau chapter. "We want every- 
one, no matter what race or gender to 
come out of their comfort zone and 
join in this occasion with us." 

Miss Black and Gold is an event 



that offers diversity programming for 
the campus and for the 12 women vy- 
ing to win the title of Miss Black and 
Gold 2006, Clark said. 

The pageant began in 1976 at the 
fraternity's national convention in 
New York to honor and showcase 
the accomplishments, beauty and tal- 
ent of African- American women. 

The pageant came to K-State in 
1999. This was something the frater- 
nity always wanted to do, but wasn't 
certain would receive a positive re- 
sponse from the university, since K- 
State had not had pageants before, 
Clark said 

Clark said the fraternity wanted 
the event to define black beauty 

"Black women do not always fit 
into the Western standards of beau- 



ty," Clark said "We wanted to shed 
light (on African-American women), 
showing they are beautiful," 

The first pageant filled Forum Hall 
with more than 500 students, faculty, 
community, friends and family mem 
bers of contestants. 

Paris Rossiter, member of Alpha 
Phi Alpha and co-coordinator of the 
first Miss Black and Gold pageant at 
K-State, said the group received a lot 
of support from faculty and students. 

Rossiter said when the fraternity 
announced 15 men planned to or- 
ganize a beauty pageant for women, 
word quickly spread throughout 
campus. 

"People were in anticipation to 
see how the pageant would turn out," 
Rossiter said 



The K-State community was skep- 
tical at first, but after seeing the fin- 
ished product, students and faculty 
recognized the time and effort put 
into the pageant, Rossiter said. 

Careem Gladney, co-coordinator 
of this year's pageant, said the crite- 
ria on which contestants are judged 
are advertisement sales, ticket sales, 
grade point average, business wear, 
talent, swimwear, formal wear, ques- 
tion- and -answer and attendance 
throughout the pageant. 

The judges of the pageant are 
members of each of the fraternity's 
Kansas chapters and Kimetris Baltrip, 
assistant professor of journalism. 

The pageant winner receives a 

See PAGEANT PaoeS 



Senators grant 3 groups funds for trip to conference 



By Magan Moiar 
KANSAS RBI COLLEGIAN 

Student senators approved 10 al- 
locations to student groups during 
their last meeting of the semester 
Thursday 

Four of the allocations went to 
campus Christian groups. Three of 
these groups, Inter Varsity Christian 
Fellowship, Ichthus Christian Fel- 
lowship and Workers of Wisdom 
requested funding to go to the same 



conference, Urbana Student Mis- 
sions Convention, Dec. 27-31 in St. 
Louis. 

There, 25,000 people are expected 
to "gather to worship God and hear 
how he is using people to accom- 
plish his purposes throughout the 
world." according to the conference 
Web site, urbana.org. 

Inter Varsity, which plans to send 
22 delegates, received $1,000; Ich- 
thus, which plans to send 34 dele- 
gates, received $1,000; and Workers 



of Wisdom, which plans to send 12 
delegates, received $550 

The discrepancy exists because 
some organizations already hit fund- 
ing limits for travel, according to the 
committee's rules, allocations com- 
mittee member Man Coleman said. 

Senators also allocated $2,649.35 
to Campus Crusade for Christ to 
bring recovering sex addict Michael 
Leahy to K-State to speak and show 
the film "Pom Nation" to "show the 
effect of pornography on our cul- 



ture,'' according to the bill. 

Senators also approved funding to 
ACTION for the Campaign for Non- 
violence and Sigma Alpha lota. Stu- 
dent Governing Association pushed 
other allocations on the agenda to 
finalize them before winter break, 
including those to the Alliance for 
Peace and Justice. Theta Alpha Pi 
and Up Til Dawn. 

For more information on alloca- 
tions, go to wu>u>.k-stateedu/osas/ 
sga. 




Car crash 

kills 
student 



By Jonathan Garten 

( ANSA5 STATE C0LIE«AN 

A 20-year-old female K-State student 
died Thursday morn- 
ing in a car accident 
when she lost control 
of her vehicle south 
of Westmoreland, 
Kan., according to 
a report by W1BW, 
Topeka's CBS affili- 
ate 

The student, Mary 
Thomsen, was driving 
on Kansas Highway 99 when the tost 
control of her Ford Contour and smashed 
into a tree. 

Thomsen's parents, Chris and Diane 
Thomsen of Hartford, Kan., were unavail- 
able for comment. The Kansas Highway 
Patrol also could not be reached for com- 
ment as of press time. 

According to an e-mail from Heather 
Reed, assistant dean of student life, • fu- 
neral for Thomsen, who was a junior in 
education and history, will be at 1.30 p.m. 
Monday at the United Methodist Church 
in Burlington, Kan. The Jones Funeral 
Home is in charge of the service. 



RCPD opens 

assessment 

to community 

By Lacey 0. Mat key 

KANSAS STATKOUKIAN 

A team of assessors from the Com- 
mission on Accreditation for Law En- 
forcement Agencies, Inc will examine 
all aspects of the Riley County Police 
Department's services, procedures and 
overall operations this weekend. 

Community members and RCPD em- 
ployees are invited to offer comments at 
an on-site assessment at 7 p.m. Monday 
in Room 161 of the Manhattan Head- 
quarters Ftre Station, 2000 Denison Ave. 

Suellyn Hooper, RCPD planning and 
accreditation manager, said the assess- 
ment is a standard procedure but one that 
indicates the importance of providing the 
community an opportunity to comment. 

"We get some people who want to air 
a grievance, maybe if they've had a speed- 
ing ticket, and we do get people who 
come out from the community," Hooper 
said. 

Hooper said every comment is taken 
seriously 

"It's good for the assessors to see both 
sides," she said 

Assessors will include Robert Johnson, 
team leader and retired from the Illinois 
Police Department; Elaine Snow, Rome 
City Police Department; and Michael 
West, Gwinnett County Police Depart- 
ment. 

Last year, 12 speakers came before the 
committee Hooper said the average is 
between eight and 15 people 

Once assessors complete a review of 
the agency, they will report to the full 
commission. The commission decides if 
the agency will be granted accredited sta- 
tus, which lasts three years. 



} 



Today's forecast 

Sunny 
High: 41 Low: 21 



ONLINE 



Holiday Home Tour 

Six decorated Manhattan houses will be featured 
in Saturday's Holiday Home Tout, which is a fund- 
raiser for McCain Auditorium. See story online 
at wwm.kstatt<otltgian.com. 



CAMPUS NEWS HIGHLIGHTS 



Director to retire 

Richard Martin, long-time orga- 
nizer of the McCain Performance 
Series, will retire Dec. 11 . He 
has been at K-State for 20 years. 
He will be recognized at 4 p.m 
Monday in the K-State Alumni 
Center. A reception will follow. The 
performance series is now in Its 
16th season. 



Kemper gallery 

Photos by photojoumalist Pete 
Souza are on display until Dec. 21 
in the Kemper Art Gallery in the 
K- State Student Union. Souza, a 
former White House photographer, 
will speak at the fall commence- 
ment ceremony and receive his 
master's degree in mass com- 
munications The gallery is open 
from 8 a.m. to S p.m. on weekdays. 



World AIDS Week 

An AIDS Walk will begin at 445 
p.m. today in Bosco Student Plaza 
and end in front of Varneys Book 
Store in Aggieville. There will be 
a remembrance candle lighting 
and a dedication of a quirt piece. 
Hot chocolate and cookies will be 
available. 



Lebanese against simply disarming Hezbollah 

TheUNSecurm;Ci)uttihis<alWwrhe*sarm 

of HezborUi. However, lew Lebanese saiyHeztwIW^hgNenstaAiliecssarmed. 

■ WHsfa| 

' disarmed 



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Page 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Friday, Dec. 1, 2006 



tlrfkn Jlookl and £cmmc4 



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Homer 
Simpson 



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BEST BETS 

Your social calendar for the weekend 



1 



Friday 



UPC After Hours 

7 p.m. to midnight K Slate Student Union 

Although registration h dosed, tome watch other students participate in a poker tourna- 
ment. Pitt up tips or just cheer on your favorite player. Plus, the first 200 people get free 
nachos. 



Feature Film: "AmeHe* 

8 p.m. tittle Theatre* 
Admission: SI 

Amrtie, a shy waitress, mattes a decision 
to help those around her find happiness. 
Along the way, she finds love and happi- 
ness herself The film is in French 

'Movie also shows 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. 
Saturday and 8 p m Sunday. Admission is 
SI for both nights 

"The Hollywood Nutcracker" 

7: JO p m McCain Auditorium 
Admission: $24 for the public, $22 for 
seniors, K- State faculty and military, S 12 for 
K State students and children. 



The classic story of "The Nutcracker," but set in 1930s Hollywood. Come enjoy this holiday 
treat as a way to celebrate the qukkly approaching end of the fall semester. 

K State women's basketball vs. Mississippi Valley State 

6 p.m. Bramlage Coliseum 

Come watch the Wildcats take on the Devilettesat the 12th -annual Commerce Bank 
Wildcat Classic. K- State plays host to the event which also includes Akom State playing 
against Idaho at 4 p.m. 




The planner 

Campus bulletin board 



2 Saturday 



The Columbian Christmas 
Spectacular 

6 p.m. The Columbian Theatre 

Admission: $20 (show only) or $37.25 (dinner 

and show) 

The annual event in Wamego, Kan., offers un- 
forgettable performances of popular Christmas 
songs. Come for dinner and the show or just 
the show. 




3 Sunday 



Relax 

Curl up with a good book or hang out 
with a group of friends and enjoy the 
last few days of the semester before 
finals week lake a stroll around I he 
mall or visit some of the shops along 
Poynu Avenue. 




The planner Is the Collegian's campus bulletin board 
service Items in the calendar can be published up to 
three times. Items might not appear because of space 
constraints but are guaranteed to appear on the day of 
the activity. To place an item in the Campus Calendar, 
stop by Kedzie 116 and fill out a form or e-mailthe 
news editor at iolleQtan@iptib.ksu.fdu by 1 1 a.m. two 
days before it is to fun. 

■ AIDS Walk 2006 will begin at 4:45 p.m. today in 
Bosco Student Plaza. The walk Will end at Vamey's 
Book Store in Aggieville. 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral 

defense of the doctoral dissertation of Peng Lu at 2 
p.m. today in Durland 1 029. 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral 
defense of the doctoral dissertation of Mehdi Kab- 



bage at 9 a.m. Monday in Throckmorton 4031. 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral 
defense of the doctoral dissertation of Kolluru Vljayal - 
akshmiat 1 p.m. Monday in Throckmorton 4031. 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral 
defense of the doctoral dissertation of Jianbin Yu at 2 
p.m. Tuesday in Throckmorton 2002. 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral 
defense of the doctoral dissertation of Janis Crow at 
2:30 p.m. in Calvin 217. 

■ The KSU Save Darfur Team Is collecting new 
and used youth and children's clothing, personal care 
items like toothpaste and soap, and school supplies for 
Darfur refugees in Sudan, Africa. Donations will be ac- 
cepted in a collection box in the Union Courtyard until 
Dec. IS. 



The blotter | Arrests in Riley County online at www.kstatecollegianxom 



Corrections and 
clarifications 

Corrections and clarifications run in thts space. 
If you see something mat should be corrected, 
call news editor Learnt Sulzenat (785) 532- 
6SS6 or e-mail (okgumMpub Hsu edu 

Kansas State Collegian 

(USPS 291 020) The Kansas State Collegian, a 
student newspaper at Kansas State University, 
is published by Student Publications Inc., 
Kedzie 10), Manhattan, KS 65506. The Col- 
legian is published weekdays during the school 
yearandonWfdrtesdays during the summer 
Modal postage is paid at Manhattan, KS 
66502. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to 
Kansas State Collegian, circulation desk, Kedzie 
103, Manhattan, KS66S06-7167. 
© Kansas State Collegian, 2006 



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Friday, Dec. 1, 2006 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page I 



Cold weather will stay; students find ways to keep warm 



By Kitelynn Ha tier 
MNStt STATE COLLEGIAN 

With a wind chill steady at 
about 8 degrees, a warm bed 
or a break for something hot to 
drink is on the minds of many 

"It's really hard to get out of 
bed in the morning when it's 
like this," Kyla Pratt, freshman 
in biology, said. "It's like, warm 
bed or freezing outside and 
class, hmm." 

The winter storm passing 
through several Midwestern 
states originated in the Pacific 
Northwest and will continue 
to move east over the week 
end, climatologist Mary Knapp 
said. 

While cities from Wichita to 
Kansas City, Kan , saw snowfall 
at up to 2 inches an hour, Man- 
hattan avoided the brunt of the 
storm, because very dry air over 
the area causes condensation 
to melt long before it reaches 
the ground, Knapp said. 

While Manhattan did not 
receive snow or winter storm 
advisories, the temperature is 
expected to remain in the 20s 
for the rest of the weekend 

"We could have stood an- 
other weekend of mild weather, 
but it's just not in the cards for 
us," Knapp said "We'll be lucky 
if we make it above freezing 
(today). We should see some 
sunshine, but it won't do much 
to provide any warmth." 

The good news, Knapp said, 
is that the wind should die down 
some in the next few days, rais- 
ing the wind chill. Knapp said 
she expected the storm to have 
passed over Kansas by early 
this morning but warned trav- 
elers to check reports often 

"This is the time of year 
where these storms can devel- 
op and change in nature very 
quickly," she said "Travelers 
should realize that conditions 
can change even while you're 



driving In this kind of weather, 
even an hour is a long time" 

Some students were caught 
off guard by the sudden drop in 
temperature. 

"I thought I had a good 
week before I needed to go 
buy gloves and things" Lleran 
Johnson, freshman in account- 
ing, said. "But 1 needed them 
ASAP. I had to run to Wal-Mart 
last night and buy gloves." 

Belinda Post, freshman in 
dance, said she didn't have any 
long-sleeved shirts in Manhat- 
tan when the cold weather 
started She had to make a trip 
home to bring some back. 

Moore Hall residents would 
have been thankful for the 
warm clothes. A fire alarm 
forced residents lo stand out- 
side for about 20 minutes 
Thursday morning when the 
temperature was in the teens, 

"It was very, very windy," 
Johnson said "A lot of people 
just had to grab something to 
wear. One guy didn't even have 
a shirt on, just a towel wrapped 
around his chest." 

Many people turned to cof- 
fee shops for respite from the 
cold. Kevin Porter, the front- 
of-house manager for Bluestem 
Bistro said the shop had about 
20 percent more visitors Thurs- 




Stevan Oofl | COi I FGIAn 
Humtwrto Gonzalez, junior In history, takes an order from Brent Watson, associate for K-State's Campus Crusade for Christ Thursday evening 
at Bluestem Bistro. Kevin Porter, the store's front -of- ho use manager, said the store had more visitors Thursday than on a normal day. 



day than on a normal day 

"It's been really, really busy," 
he said "So many people are 
coming in and getting some- 



thing warm to drink and just 
taking a minute to relax out of 
the cold" 

Mallory Ayers, sophomore 



in business administration and 
Union Station employee, said 
Thursday's sales were about 
double those of a normal day, 



"We had tines backed out 
the door for about a hour when 
it was really crazy," she said 
"It's been steady all day, really." 



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Directory 



MANHATTAN JEWISH 
CONGREGATION 

Wonilp: rri 7 II pm 
ISM ttfrili At* Manhattan 

Evtnonr welcome! 

wwwr.iniiiiiaitiMjrMifafacong.org 

lo association with HILLEL 

the Jvwhh it u dent organ i rat Ion 

www.lt vlale.edu/huVI 



Unitarian- ^jj 
UntversalistCy 
Fellowship 
of Manhattan 



-Hi I Zeandak Rn*i {Where reatoq and 

intuition guide nut penojul journeys 

ftof r a m Sunday at 10 45 lid. Heliguiu* 

cducalHW t laiKi fot luulh 

Child Care Provided 

A Wekonuo| CMUpeiatxm 

Rev Michael Sclvm 

inlormilKMi call (785) 537- 2.VW 



& 



Christian Science 
Society 



Sunday 10:30 a.m. 

Danforth Chapel 

KSU Campus 



Wed, 7:30 in Reading Room 

Reading Room open Tuei.-Thuis. 11-1 

105 N. 4th St. 




Grace 
Baptist 
Church 

-"Jill llitlens 2 Wits I i«l Still t lulil 

♦ Sunday Worship ♦ 
8:00,9:30,11:00 a.m. 

i, olltguir UiMr I .(hit ( liii H 00 1 m 
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785-776-0424 
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UJGo.m. fteHto Broadcast 95,3 FM 



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Neil Engle 
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776S790 

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Grow and Go Forth! 



Welcome 
to 

FIRST 
LUTHERAN CHURCH 

Saturday Service 

5:30 p.m 

Sunday Worship 

8 30 and 11 i.m 

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Bible Study # lutbet Houjt 

Good vv Evil 
*lrh the ChfonrdrH of Nj r nu 

THundiy tpm 
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2ICAMPUS 



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tlCA 



St Isidore's 

Catholic Student 

Center 

MASS SCHEDULE 

Tuttday Thurtday 10:00 p.m 

Friday tj:10p m, 

Siturday I p.m. 

Sunday 9:30 a.m., 1 1 i,m, 

Sun. 4:10 p.m., 6 p.m. 

Father Keith WaMt, CKapUln 

711D«nll0n 539-7496 



*nrJlip S«vi« '* All hlltu Cluprl. KSU 

Suratj School: <MU-llHSa.m. 

i iimtw Sfmir: 111:1 ^12:<HI Noon 



[tad Murni^>*» « llw*«lh Oapcl.KN'l! 
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ad plncud In (lie CJoliesinn^ 

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Celebration 

Semjice 



First Presbyterian Chunk 

801 Leavenworth 
Manhattan. Ks 66502 

785-537-0518 

Pastor: R.C. McConnell 

Associate Pastor Anne Schetber 



"Sing to the Lord 

a new song, 
his praise front 
the etuis of 
the earth..." 
Cotiempomry Hbrship Service 
Sundays at 11:45 am. 
Everyone ts Welcome 
Cofcge Fefcwwh»p Dinner 
to folow service 



www.firstpresmanhattanxom 



You are welcome at. 




Weefcly Service* 

Sunday 

Traditional Service B 00 am 

Sunday School 9 30 am 

Contemporary Servictj 10 45 am 

Prayar Meoting 8 00 pm 

Wednesday 

Bible Study 7 00 pm 

Youth Group {grades 7-12) 

Royal Rangsrc (Boys Cluba) 

MleMonettM (Quia Cluba) 

Chi Alpha Camput Mmtatriaa 7 00 pm 

(KSU Llttla Theater | 



Hf^ 



J*i_ 



4a 




A/vnery Aic^*<)W £* <*if J«*TrVfH 



Rev Todd Wcsiort Pnstot 

?3to Candicwood Dt Manhattan ks h6503 

i rM) S3? /B33 www.maniiatlanag onj 



OPINION 



Cage 4 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Friday, Dec. 1,2006 



TO THE POINT 

Health care 
must provide 
for uninsured 

On "The Daily Show with 
Jon Stewart," former Vermont 
Gov. Howard Dean said one of 
thehopesofthe T0IMIiian 

ncW Democ ratic edl torla I se lected 

.. and debated 

1 1 lajonties in the by the editorial 

! louse and Sen- b £ flrd ^d written 
after a majority 

■ ite is to provide opinion is formed. 

■ ... . This is the 

I K'alth insurance collegian's official 

to everyone under °P |n ' on 
age 25. 

But insuring millions of mi 
insured Americans is easier said 
han done. Today's Collegian cites 
^ report stating 17 percent of col- 
lege students are uninsured. 

It is no question U.S. health 
.are needs reform, and students 
are some of the people most af- 
" rted by this need. But what can 
be done? Look to Massachusetts 

• ! Canada. 

This year, Massachusetts 
; Mssed a plan that is one of the 
closest to universal health care in 
the country. The law combined 
jiibsidies for those who weren't 
properly insured with a require- 
ment that all citizens have insur- 
ance, according to a U.S. News- 
« ire article on Yahoo.com. 

Canada offers complete uni- 
versal health care, which allows 

I eligible individuals to receive 
I atment for almost any medical 
ffOtttm. However, taxpayers foot 
lie bill. 

The United States needs to 
vform health care immediately. 
Write your Congressional repre- 
sentatives about your concerns 
.ind the urgency of this dilemma. 



Collegian 



Imlly Liwrtnu | EDITOB IN (Kill 

K«ry Ftithtr | MmtlfcllK, IDHOH 

Lunn SuIimi I NFWS IOIT0H 

Abby Brownb«k | COM f HI! I 

Mtg«n Mow I Cllf d0» IDIIDN 

Krln*n Rodtrlck | uwnj:, i until- 

Anthony M*ndou | SMWIS \WQ» 

AnnttU Ljwttlt | 1MI IPOE EEIIIO* 

Owm Kmntdy | OPINION f OITOA 

2«h»ryT.lck«ll|l'(!tMNHI|flN f D-TOK 

sttiMnooHlworamiTOfi 

Noyi« Hiynti | DKUNI FOTOa 

Login C. Actjmt | IMIIK tOITQfl 

KtllyWIIIIamt |*DMANMEK 

CouHnoy Steyptn | ASS7 <[! MMUUIlt 



WRITE TO US 

urn tan be submitted by e-mail to ttnenmipub. 
m ftfu, or in person to Kedne 116. Please include 
■ii full name, year in school and major. Letters 
<uM be limited to 250 words. All submitted letters 
■ty be edited for length and clarity. 



CONTACT US 

Kansas State Collegian 
Kediie 103 Manhattan, KS 66S02 

display ads (7851 SJ2 -6560 

Classified ads. (7851 532 «5S 

Newsroom (7851532-6556 

ntwsittpub.ksu.tdu 
Delivery (785)532-6555 



CAMPUS FOURUM 

395-4444 -or- 

fourum@spub.ksu.edu 

uV f ampus Fourum is the Collegian's anonymous 
' y II in system The Fourum is edited to eliminate 
1 1 gar, racist, obscene and libelous comments. The 
crmmentsare not the opinion of the Collegian nor 
*< they endorsed by the editorial staff. 

ft 'oiwntnt that violates the Fourum s policy on 
BtJVM mistakenly allowed in the Fourum on Nov. 
I lie Collegian regrets this mistake and would Irite 
ipotegize to the members of Phi Gamma Delta. 

' <nks Cib, you wasted two hours of my study 
■ •last night. 

I < u know what really grinds my gears? Winter. 



I »d mere Fourum? fie to wwwJaUttattt- 

I I .m.tom for the hi II »e rc I on . 



Forbidden holiday? 

ACLU fights observation, celebration of Christmas with annual lawsuits 




RYAN 
SPENCER 



So we're reaching that time of 
year again. What time, you lay? 
The time of the year when we 
remember 
how certain 
organizations 
in this country 
seem to hate 
Christians. No, 
not al-Qaeda, 
not even the 
Democratic 
Party. The 
group of which 
I speak has far 

more power than these 1 speak of 
the American Civil Liberties Union 
You haven't heard of it? 

Let me introduce it to you. The 
Baptist Press News in December 
2002 reported on a New Jersey 
third- grade teacher who, under 
pressure from the ACLU, cancelled 
a class trip to see "A Christmas 
Carol" on Broadway It's unfor- 
tunate these children missed out 
on a wonderful opportunity. The 
Washington Times also ran a story 
in December 2002 about a lawsuit 
filed by the ACLU against a 
Georgia Public School 
district that 
designated Dec. 
25 as Christmas. 
However, the 
ACLU had no 
problem with 
the designations 
of Kwanzaa or 
Hanukkah, and overlooked 
the fact that Christmas is a 
federal holiday. 



In December 2003, the Times 
ran a story about the ACLU filing 
action against a Pittsburgh, Penn., 
parking lot for setting aside park- 
ing stalls for visitors to a Roman 
Catholic nativity 
scene 

I could go on and 
on. It's a given part of 
the calendar year that 
right around Nov. 30, 
the stories around the 
water cooler, or what- 
ever you kids gather 
around these days, 
start to circulate 
about people are 
anti-Christmas 
and why they do 
what they do. 

If you're 
saying to 
yourself. 
"I've never 
heard 
about 



these stories or untold facts of the 

secularist crowd," that means you're 
one of those people, so congratula- 
tions. 





Now that you know what the 
ACLU is in regard to Christmas, It's 
important to remember the ACLU 
can be fun during the Christmas 
season. Try sending Christmas 
cards. Yes. Christmas cards! Wanna 
have some fun this Christmas? 
Send some Christmas cheer to 
the ACLU! Since it is working so 
diligently to eliminate the Christ- 
mas part of the holiday season, we 
all should send the ACLU a nice, 
Christian card to brighten up its 
dark. sad. little world. 

Make sure it says "Merry Christ- 
mas" on it! Here's the address: 
ACLU 

125 Broad Street. 18th Floor 
New York, NY 10004 
If you're going to send one, don't 
be rude - that's not the reason 
for the season. We really want to 
communicate with the ACLU. It 
deserves us I think everyone who 
cares about the holiday should send 
a card to wish the ACLU a Merry 
Christmas and spread the cheer 
This is just the thing to bring some 
Christmas joy to those who might 
not have (he chance to experience 
H So spend S0.39 and tell the 
ACLU to leave Christmas alone. 
Also tell it there is no such thing 
as a "holiday tree." It's a Christ- 
mas tree. 

Oh, and Merry Christmas. 



Ryan Spencer is a senior in hotel and 
restaurant management. Please 
send comments to opinion a spuo. 
kui.tdv. 



Self-discovery, growth needed before marriage 




As a fifth-year student. I've 
learned quite a bit and seen a lot 
happen here in Manhattan For 
example, 1 
remember 
when the old 
Wal-Mart was 
where Hobby 
Lobby is to- 
day: I remem- 
ber when we 
didn't have 
a Target, and 
I can recall 
when Aggie 
Station, a 

lormer bar in Aggieville. burned 
down. But the thing that has 
changed most since I started my 
education at K-State is the relation- 
ship scene 

What has surprised me is lately 
is how everyone seems to talk to 
only one person and immediately 
consider himself or herself to be in 
a relationship. Maybe it is because 



MEGAN 

GREEN 



I am a fifth-year, and many stu- 
dents my age are getting married, 
but I feel like a lot of students years 
younger (han I am already are in 
serious relationships 

! have to ask: what happened to 
casual dating' 1 Whatever happened 
to just having fun and getting to 
know people? It almost seems 
now thai if you kiss someone or 
go on a dale with someone, you're 
immediately considered "in a 
relationship"; and if you're in a 
relationship, the thoughts and talk 
of getting married to thai person 
come pretty quickly There is no 
time even to think! 

In 2002, the Census Bureau 
reported that 50 percent of mar- 
riages end in divorce. Half! Dotal 
that mean we really should take 
our time and look at Ihc person we 
think is "the one"? I am pretty sure 
no one wants to go through the 
heartache of divorce, so can't we 
slow down? 



Where did casual dating go? I 
understand some people are fortu- 
nate enough to find the person of 
their dreams and marry him or her 
while still in college or i mined ialely 
after 

But we change after we graduate 
and get a job, It's like the transition 
from high school to college, there s 
a huge growth in your maturity 
This is the lime to figure out what 
we want in a person with whom 
we will spend our entire lives, not 
to mention the lime to develop 
our personalities and get to know 
ourselves 

"Early marriage is a key predic- 
tor of later divorce." the Atlanta 
Journal Constitution said in 2005 
According to the newspaper, the 
divorce rale drops to 24 percent for 
people who marry after age 25. 

College used to be about hav- 
ing fun (and I don't mean being 
promiscuous; I mean fun), DMt) 
ing people and possibly starting a 



relationship But when did a kiss 
become the beginning of a relation - 
ship? And when did a relationship 
become a marriage proposal? 

I am 22 years old, and there is 
no way 1 am ready for a serious 
relationship I've just gotten started 
with my life. 

My favorite thing to do on a ca- 
sual dale is to eat pizza with a guy 
and watch a movie If we get along 
romantically, great If we don't, 
then we'll be friends There'll be no 
awkward moment when one has 
to tell the other the frequent 1980s 
excuse, "It's not you; it's me." 

I in ready to have fun, meet 
people and learn about myself. 
Then when the right guy does 
come along, I'll be ready to fully 
make that commitment. 



Megan Green is a fifth year student In mass 
communications. Please send comments to 

opinion oipuo. fcsu.edu. 







*UT THERE BtA DRWT..." 




OAYNE 

LOGAN 



Friday, Dec. 1,2006 

KU unlikely 
to go bowling 



TVo weeks ago K-State football 
fans were left with a bitter taste in 
their mouths after the Wildcats suf 
fered defeat at the 
hands of in state 
rival Kansas Ven- 
geance might be 
|ust two days away. 

The official 
college football 
bowl selections list 
will be released 
Sunday, and there 

is a good chance 

Kansas will not be on it. 

Kansas' regular-season record 
(6-6) was good enough to make the 
team eligible for bowl consider- 
ation, but it left the Jayhawks in a 
tie with Oklahoma State for eighth 
place in the Big 12 Conference 
standings. 

The Big 12 has contracts 
with only eight bowl games, which 
means one of the two teams will 
not be guaranteed a bowl and will 
have to hope for an at- large bid 
selection. Early indications are 
that Kansas will be the odd team 
out, largely due to the fact that the 
Jayhawks have failed to bring large 
crowds to bowl games in the past. 

In 2003, Kansas failed to sell 
even a quarter of the 12,000 tickets 
it was allotted for the Tanger- 
ine Bowl. Even when the school 
offered the remaining tickets to 
students free of charge, several 
thousand were left over 

If Kansas is, in fact, forced to 
rely on an at -large bid, it likely will 
be left out altogether. 

A new NCAA rule establishes 
that all teams with a record better 
than 6 6, regardless of conference, 
must be given bowl games before 
any 6-6 teams can be considered. 
This leaves Kansas in a precarious 
position, given that there are 68 
bowl eligible teams and only 64 
spots available. 

Because of the new NCAA rule, 
it is anticipated Kansas will be 
staying home, along with other big 
conference teams like Alabama, 
Arizona and Washington State. 
Teams from smaller conferences 
like Troy, Middle Tennessee and 
Northern Illinois are expected to go 
bowling instead 

In fact, CBS.SpoTtsiine.com, MS- 
NBC com and VSATodaycom all 
have left Kansas off of their bowl 
projection lists. 

While many college football 
fans will be upset by the new bowl 
selection system, it is doubtful any 
complaints will be coming out of 
Manhattan on Sunday. 



Dayna Lagan is a senior in print journalism. 
Pleas* i*nd comment s to ipom*ipub.kiu. 



SPORTS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Defending pride 




Junior guard 
Klmbarty 
Dicta drives 
pasta 
Creighton 
defender 
during a 
game Nov. 13 
at Bra ml age 
Coliseum. 

Photo* by 
Ohrfttophar 
Hanawlnckal 
COLLEGIAN 



K- State looks to recapture Wildcat Classic title 
after seeing losses in last 2 years of tournament 



By Scott Girard 
KANSAS STATE CMfCIAN 



After losing the champion- 
ship game in the Commerce Bank 
Wildcat Classic the past two years, 
the K-Stale women's basketball 
team hopes to return to the top of 
the annual two-day tournament in 
Bramlage Coliseum. 

K-State lost to St. Joseph's last 
year by 10 points and to Liberty by 
21 the previous year, playing with- 
out all time leading scorer Kendra 
Wecker. who was injured in the 
previous game. 

"It is a pride thing, loo. It is our 
home court and in front of our 
fans. It is definitely something we 
want to get done," senior guard 
Claire Coggins said. 

The Wildcats enter the first 
game against Mississippi Valley 
State on Friday with a 4- 1 record 
The one loss came in the form of 
a three-point defeat by Wisconsin 
in the opening round of the UNLV 
Lady Rebel Shootout last Friday 
The team rebounded the next day 
to beat Elon 75-34. 

"We definitely know that we 
have to work harder, and things 
are not going to come easy to us," 
sophomore Marlies Gipson said 
"We just to have to value our pos 
sessions and work as a team." 

Ki mberly Dietz was named to 
the Ail-Tournament team at the 



UNLV Lady Rebel Shootout after 
shooting 60 percent from the floor 
during the two games. She aver- 
aged 16 points per 
game and made 5- 
of-10 three-point at- 
tempts. She said she 
hopes to continue 
her solid shooting in 
this tournament. 

"I just try to think how it felt 
when I was shooting those shots, 
how was my form and everything," 
Dietz said. "You just try to tell your- 
self what you were doing right." 

This is the 12th annual Cora 
merce Bank Wildcat Classic The 
Wildcats won the six tournaments 
prior to their losses in the last two 
championships The Wildcats de- 
feated Idaho in the 1999 Wildcat 
Classic, in the two teams' only pre- 
vious meeting. 



K-State vs. Mississippi 

Valley State 
When: 6pm today 
Where: Bramlage Coliseum 




Although all three teams in the 
tournament have at least one loss, 
the Wildcats understand they can- 
not underestimate the 
competition 

"I think we are 
starting to get a bet- 
ter feel for each other 
and starting to get our 
offense down." Dietz said. "We are 
coming together well, and 1 think 
we will prove that this weekend" 

The Wildcats have seen consis- 
tent scoring from several players 
this year Dietz, Coggins and Gip- 
son have scored in double digits 
nearly every game this year and av- 
erage at least 1 1 points per game. 

The Wildcats will face either Al- 
corn State or Idaho on Saturday. 
The two losing teams will play at 
4 p.m., while the winners will play 
for the championship at 6 p.m. 



Senior Claire 
Coggins 

works her 
way around 
a Creighton 
defender 
during a 
game Nov. 1 3 
at Bramlage 
Coliseum. 



Colorado State to prove a challenge for Wildcats 




; jotlynBrown ui;li.i"i 

Freshman forward tuis Colon pulls down a rebound during the 
exhibition game against Washburn Nov. 1 1 at Bramlage Coliseum 



By Nick Dunn 
KANSAS SMTf COUEGIAN 

When K-State center Jason Bennett steps on 
the court Saturday at Moby Arena, he'll be able 
to look eye-lo-eye with someone waiting for him 
on the other end. 

The Rams are led by a Goli- 
ath of their own in 7-fool, 230- 
pound center |ason Smith. The 
junior leads his team with 16.6 
points and 104 rebounds through the first six 
games of the season. 

On Wednesday, Smith led Colorado State 
(4-2) to an 81-73 victory at Denver, notching 24 
points and nine rebounds 

"I think |ason (Bennett) 's getting better,'' K- 
Stale coach Bob Huggins said "They're going to 
have to play against people like this the rest ol 
the way We might as well gel started now." 

Huggins was speaking before the Wildcats" 
(4-2) four -day, two -game road tnp that included 
games at California and Colorado State. 

The Golden Bears dominated inside with 
their two talented big men, Ryan Anderson and 
DeVon Hardin That along with several other 
factors, contributed to the lopsided 78-48 vic- 
tory for California on Wednesday night 

Although the outcome was less than desire- 
able, Bennett showed much improvement in the 
loss He tied a K-State record with six blocks. 

Luis Colon, on the other hand, look one large 
step backward He was ejected mte in the game 



K State at Colorado State 

When: 4:05 p.m. Saturday 

Whtrt: Moby Arena, Fort Collins, Colo, 

Radio: X State Sports Network; 



for punching California's Taylor Harrison in the 
back of the head 

Neither Bennett nor Colon has been able to 
provide much on the offensive end. averaging a 
combined 3.9 points per game. 

Huggins said he expects to see more scoring 
from the center position in the 
future. 

That'd sure be nice," Huggins 
said, "We're just going to have 
to keep working with them. 
As they become more comfortable and we start 
to pass the ball and make some shots, we'll get 
them the ball with not as much congestion" 

In K-State's 71-67 win over the Rams at 
Bramlage Coliseum last season, the Wildcats 
were able to hold Smith to just six points on 0- 
of-5 shooting from the field. 

COLON SUSPENDED 

K State men's basketball coach Bob Hug- 
gins announced Thursday that freshman center 
Colon would be suspended for Saturday's game 
agamsl Colorado State due to his actions in 
Wednesday night's game against California. 

Colon was ejected after striking Harrison 
with 6 39 remaining in the second half Game 
officials invoked the NCAA rule regarding fight- 
ing, result mg in Colon's automatic ejection and 
subsequent suspension from the team's next 
i! j me 

— Courtesy of I Stat* Sports Inttrmaban 



Page 5 

1-MINUTE 
DRILL 

Staff Reports 

FBC | K-State bowl tickets to go 
on sale beginning 9 a.m. Monday 

X- State w* begin accepting bowl ticket 
orders at 9 am Monday, after the announce- 
ment of Its bowl destination, Director of 
Athletics Tan Wetsei announced Thursday. 

Ticket prices and other information wi be 
available as soon as a bowl invitation has been 
accepted, Werser said. K-State is not expected 
to learn lb bowl destination until Sunday. The 
Wldub are being considered by the Alamo 
Bowl Insight Bowl, Brut Sun Bowl, PetroSun 
Independence Bowl and Texas Bowl. 

The easiest method to order tKkeis is 
online at iwwi-sfafnpom.com. by clicking 
on the bowl information tab aratsekxttng"Buy 
Bowtrrtet'DoTiors to the Abeam Scholarship 
fund and season ticket holders placing online 
orders should click on the "Don or" button for 
tickets. Fans also can order in person at the 
K-State Athletic Ticket Office In Bramlage 
Coliseum or by calling I (800) 221 -CATS. 



Associated Press 




BKC | Kansas coach Self gets 
5-year contract extension 

LAWRENCE — Kansas basketball coach 
Bill Self got a five-yeai contract extension 
Thursday thai bumps up his annual compen- 
sation to more than $1 i million 

Under the deal, which began retroac 
twly on April 1 and goes through March 
201 1, Self will be paid $220,000 in salary with 
additional payments for professional services, 
public relations and promotional duties 
— boosting his annual compensation to 
SI .175 million He could make an additional 
5350,000 per year if he meets certain incen- 
tives. He previously was pad $ 129,380 in 
annual salary. 

Under the agreement, which athletic 
director lew Perkins said look months to 
finalize, Self also is guaranteed S 350,000 from 
apparel and footwear agreements, $400,000 
lor professional services, and $250,000 In 
summer basketball camp revenue. 

Self, a four time finalist for the Naismtth 
Coach of the Year Award, has guided 
three different teams —Tulsa, Illinois 
and Kansas — to the quarterfinals of the 
NCAA Tournament. He's in his fourth year 
as Kansas' coach, guiding the Jayhawks to 
a 78-25 record, a share of the last two Big 
12 Conference regular -season titles and the 
championship of the 2006 Big 12 Tournament. 



BKC | Minnesota basketball coach 
Monson resigns after 2-5 start 

MINNEAPOLIS — Dan Monson resigned 
as the men's basketball coach at Minnesota on 
Thursday, one day after his team's fifth straight 
loss. 

The Gophers fell to 2-5 with a 90-68 loss 
at home to Clemson. Minnesota's skid is Its 
wont since a sin-game slide during the 1962-63 
season. 

Monson had come under increasing fire 
to turn around a once-proud program brought 
low by an academic fraud scandal under former 
coach Clem Haskms 

The Gophers emerged from NCAA 
sanctions in Monsons tenure, but by his eighth 
season, fans wanted more. 

Undet Monson, who had a 1 18- 106 ovwal 
record but was 44 68 tn the Big 10, The Bam' 
went from one of the most raucous, difficult 
places to play in the conference to a lethargic 
arena with thousands of empty seats 



BKN | Not so desperate, Longona 
engaged to Spurs guard Parker 

NEW YORK — Her marriage didn't work 
out on "Desperate Housewives," but things are 
looking rosy in real I iff for Eva Longoria: she's 
engaged to her beau, 
basketball star Tony 
Parker 

Tony flew ntolos 
Angeles last night after 
his game and surprised 
Eva at her home as 
shegotoffwork.Tiza 
Anderson told The 
Associated Press on 
Thursday via e-mail 

The proposal was romantic and perfect* 

The couple plans to wed in France in 
summer 2007 in wtwt they desmoe as a "big, 
happy ceremony with lots of family and friends " 

The 3 1 year-old longoria, who plays crafty 
GabntHe Soils on the hit ABC show, met Spurs 
point guard Parker, a 24 year old Frenchman, in 
the San Antonio Spurs locker room after a game 
two years ago 




Longoria 



4- 



ONCE IN A LIFETIME 



Page 6 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Friday, Dec. 1,2006 



Despite plans, circumstances alter proposals 



PLANS TO PROPOSE IN 
STYLE GO AWRY 

I had big plans for a nice pro- 
posal to my girlfriend while she 
was off at her internship in New 
York City. I decided this was 
the best opportunity for me to 
pop the question, since we both 
would be driving back to Man- 
hattan to start the fall semester. 

Let's fust say things didn't go 
as planned. 

The ring was purchased I 
had a game plan. After dinner 
on a Friday night, I was going 
to pull the ring out and propose 
to her, maybe at Central Park or 
one of the many beautiful areas 
available in the city. 

Well, she broke down crying, 
talking about how I was never 
going to many her. My way to 
get her to stop crying? Pull out 
the engagement ring while we 
were lying in bed. Keep in mind 
she is still crying at this point. 

It wasn't romantic, and it 
didn't help that the setting was a 
dingy residence complex at Co- 
lumbia University. 

But I don't think anyone else 
has story quite like this one. 

— By Anthony Mmdou 

INSECTS, BIG BEACHES 
DELAY PROPOSAL 

The plan was to pop the ques- 
tion in Pensacola, Ra., which is 
a short drive from New Orleans 
We both enjoy the outdoors and 
had about $20 between us, so 
we decided to pitch a tent in the 
state park and hit the beach the 
next day 

We awoke the next morning 
to a line of red ants streaming in 
through a hole in our tent. These 
were no ordinary ants - they 
were like the Mongol Horde 
of the ant world Their leader, 
clearly a brilliant strategist, tar- 
geted our suitcases, specifically 
the undergarments therein. 

After about an hour of shak- 
ing and swatting, we deemed our 
suitcases ant-free and headed to 
the beach. 

Perdido Key is a picturesque 
white-sand beach near Pensac- 
ola. We frolicked in the surf and 
marveled at our good fortune 

- we practically had the beach 
to ourselves 

In retrospect, that probably 
should have raised some sort of 
red flag. But we were young, in 
love, and blissfully unaware of 
the dangers of marine life 

That is, until I felt my face 





Sdimltz- Williams 

Carissa Schmitz, senior in advertising 
and Kelly Will id ms, junwr in secondary 
education announce their engagement. 

Carissa is the daughter of Gilbert and 
Deb Schmitz of Baileyville, Kan., and 
Kelly is the son of Kelly Williams Sr. of 
Agency, Mo. and Julie Williams of 
Seneca, Kan. 

They plan a July 14, 2007 wedding 
Seneca, Kan, 



explode in pain, as if I'd been 
pegged with a cactus. 

I had, in fact, been stung by a 
jellyfish. We had a bottle of mus- 
tard in our cooler, which seemed 
considerably better than urine. 
the other tried-and-lruc jellyfish 
antidote. My girlfriend slath- 
ered mustard on my face and 
neck, but it did nothing to ease 
the pain. The only effect was to 
make me smell like a New York 
City hotdog vendor who'd just 
been stung by a jellyfish. 

At this point, it was clear the 
forces of nature were eonspir 
ing to prevent me from propos- 
ing, However, what I lacked in 
charm I made up for in perse- 
verance. 

Wc arrived al Pensacola 
Beach, which we were assured 
was free of jellyfish. This. I de- 
cided, was the place. 

I gave her a notebook with 
a few assorted memories from 
our lime together Al the end, 1 
wrote "Meet me on the beach." 

While she read. I iound a se- 
cluded spot half a mile away. 1 
spread out a blanket, took the 
ring from my pocket and waited 
And waited And waited 

Being from the Midwest, 
there's something I didnt real- 
ize about beaches. They're big. 

If one is going to find a spe- 
cific place on said beach, one 
needs clear directions. Especial- 
ly if it's dark 

To make a long story short, 1 
spent about an hour wandering 
the beach, looking for her. 

When I finally found her, I 



decided I should propose before 
a giant whale emerged from the 
ocean and swallowed the ring. 

Fortunately, she said yes. 

Admittedly, it wasn't the 
smoothest proposal in the his- 
tory of engagements However, 
there was a silver lining. 

After that, there was no way 
she'd ever trust me to plan the 
wedding 

ByAuitinHw* 

HE REMEMBERED 
HER FAVORITE ONE 

After the big moment finally 
comes and you call everyone in 
your ecl! phone contact list, peo- 
ple inevitably will ask, "Howd 
he do it?" 

Don't worry. You will get 
better at telling it, and your story 
will get more concise. 

I met Justin Rice at the end 
of my freshman year through 
the rowdy party crowd that 
was sixth-floor Moore Hall. We 
started dating my sophomore 
year, and the rest is history. 

Well, not quite. 

I'm just excited it's finally 
here, because we went ring 
shopping in July. After look- 
ing al three or four places and 
selecting my favorite ring from 
each, we came to the last store. 

The ring had a princess cut 
center stone and a pav£ band 



both for the engagement ring 
and wedding band I fell in love 
with it and would not take it off. 
The saleswoman dubbed it the 
"Heidi ring," and we added the 
store's business card to the oth 
ers we'd already collected 

To be honest, 1 bugged that 
man for months, worried the 
ring would be gone once he'd 
gotten past his "money trou- 
bles." Little did I know, those 
"money troubles" were because 
he started making payments on 
my ring the very next day. 

Fast forward to Oct. 28. 
Justin picked me up from the 
K State vs. Iowa State football 
game and drove me home. I had 
the keys to our apartment in my 
hand because Justin had to look 
for his phone in the car, which 
took only a minute, but I was 
the one who unlocked the door. 

The first words I said as I 
stepped inside were, "There's a 
lot of flowers in here" 

Justin had searched out 10 
dozen roses from every florist 
in town and placed them in five 
vases around the living room 

When I turned around, 
still not thinking anything but, 
"Aww, how sweet," Justin wasn't 
there 

Nope, he was down on one 
knee, with the little while box, 
grinning at me. 



Illuitrition by Donni* Im ICOUICIM 



I just repeated myself and 
said, "There's a lot of flowers 
in here." and then I asked him, 
"Really?" 

All the while I was thinking, 
"Omigosh It's really here. This 
is really happening. I did not ex- 
pect it.*' 

Sure, it was our two-year an- 
niversary, but the thought never 
crossed my mind that he might 
propose. 

The poor guy, I'm sure, said 
everything he should have, 
but the only thing I heard was, 
"Blah, blah, blah (because I was 
too busy thinking 'omigosh'). I 
love you. Will you marry me?" 

I said aloud (regrettably 
enoughj, "You're really doing 
(his! I think I'm going to pee my 
pants! Omigosh," So he opened 
the box, and I said, "Yes." 

He pul the ring on my finger, 
and dam it if it wasn't thai same 
ring I'd picked. Amazingly beau- 
tiful. My favorite. 

Never saw it coming. 

The next day his mother, 
Cathy, drove down to Wamego, 
Kan., and we took pictures at 
the park. It was a lovely way to 




Lawrence - Mendoza 

Emily Lawrence, senior in education 
and Anthony Mendoza. senior in print 
journalism announce their engagement 

Emily is the daughter of Don and 
Sandy Lawrence of Riverton, Utah, and 
Anthony is the son of John and Priscilla 
Mendoza ol Santa Ana, Calif. 

They plan a July 7. 2007 wedding in 
Southern Calif. 



Want more Once in a 

Lifetime? 

Read about wedding planning. Web 

sites and serving alcohol at receptions 

at www.kWfcwttyMi.Bini. 

Recaption codrUib 

Personal yiews often dktate whether or 

not afchohol is served at weddings, 

ntdding planner 

Online sites help plan weddings rot *w. 



spend the afternoon. 

Of course, everyone's ask- 
ing about the date. J was hoping 
and wishing and praying for a 
fall wedding, like Sept 22. 

And that's what we're going 
with. 
-ByrtadiPwfcon 



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Events second. We can 
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Friday, Dec. 1,2006 



ONCE IN A LIFETIME 



Page 7 



Honeymoon mishaps 
will occur, so be ready 



By Nkol« Johnston 

KAWUSTMICOUKIMI 

While the wedding can be 
blissful, sometimes honey- 
moons don't go exactly as 
planned 

After the stress of my wed- 
ding, it was a great feeling to 
get on the plane to Orlando, 
Fla ., and know the week 
ahead would be stress-free 
and wonderful - once we 
actually got on the plane, that 
is, 

The first mistake I made 
was the biggest and almost 
cost us the entire trip. I'll 
never forget standing in the 
airport at 4 a.m. putting my 
credit card in the machine to 
print off our tickets and see 
ing a message that read, "You 
can only print your tickets off 
on the day of your flight" 

That wasn't exactly what 
1 was expecting. After try- 
ing three times, I asked the 
woman working there She 
said I had purchased tickets 
for the next day, and I imme- 
diately freaked out. After the 
woman told us we'd have to 
pay $400 to change the ticket 
date, 1 knew 1 had screwed 
up big. There was nothing we 
could do, though, because our 
cruise was scheduled to leave 
that day. We had to pay the 
money or waste a cruise in 
the Caribbean 

The clerk told us she'd be 
right back, and as soon as she 
left, I felt the salty tears roll 
down my cheeks. But we had 
the amazing luck of newly 
weds, because she returned 
to the desk and said, "Happy 
honeymoon. We are waiving 
the fee" 

I can't even explain how 

lucky we were there was even 

a flight at the time we needed. 

This leads me to Lesson 
| One for honeymooners - pay 
attention to every detail, 



including flight dates 

Lesson Two, keep track 
of your lifein-a-bag - your 
makeup bag. 

Somehow, in the scramble 
to leave the church and go 
to the reception, someone 
picked up my makeup bag by 
mistake. If you are any sort 
of girly girl, you will relate to 
me and agree that it's kind 
of impossible to go on your 
honeymoon without your 
makeup bag. I had to pick 
through my moms makeup 
to find some thai would make 
do for the trip. Obviously, I 
was not thrilled. However. I 
survived and enjoyed the first 
five nights of my cruise. 

But on the sixth night, I 
was really glad 1 had makeup, 
because I needed it to cover 
a bruise on the bridge of my 
nose. I remember it like yes- 
terday. 

"Oh, look, the wind is 40 
nipli." 1 said as we walked up 
to the top deck 

You would think ail the 
lawn chairs closing would be 
a good sign not to sit in them, 
but nothing triggered As I 
tried to take my seat, the back 
of my chair slammed into 
the bridge of my nose. Try 
to imagine what a metal bar 
flying at 40 mph feels like on 
your nose. Needless to say, it 
was painful and left a lasting 
impression. 

The main lesson of the trip 
was to pay attention. Soon-to- 
be honeymooners. accept that 
something semi-unfortunate is 
bound to happen, and pay at- 
tention to your surroundings. 

Hopefully you can dodge 
that killer lawn chair before il 
attacks 



Nkole Johnston it a junior in print jour 
Mliim, She had her hawk honeymoon 
in September . Weave send comments to 
collegian a ipukksu. rdu. 



Use fun cards to save wedding date 

The new year brings a lot of plans: resolutions, goals, conferences, appointments, trips... 

That is why this time of year is the most important time to make sure all of your guests-to-be know the date of your wedding. 
The importance of iave-the-date cards increases if the big day falls during peak wedding and vacation months like June and 
July. 

Here are some fun ways to help your guests remember to save the date. 

MplMMMlOUMM 



1. Picture perfect: Planning a formal wed- 
ding? This save the-date card Is the perfect 
place to let your fun side show. Forthis photo 
booth card, get four pieces of cardstock and 

write "saw "the/'date," and your date on 
each. Find an old photo booth and smile away, 
showing the cards In order, one per frame. 

2, Stick to K: Most people will mart their 
calendars, but this fun save -the -date card wi 
make them remember. Sticker sheets are avail- 
able at any office supply store. Find a wall cal- 
endar and scan the date of your wedding onto 
your computer. Make a note to save the date 
on the image and print on a note card. Ned, 
measure the sue of the date square and print a 
save the date sticker that will fit in its place. Cut 
out the sticker, induding its backing, and affix 
with double -sided tape to the calendar square. 

i. Breaking news: So you've already run 
your engagement announcement in the local 
newspaper, and there are copies of it lying 
around. Why not use them to help communi- 
cate the date of your wedding? Tear out the 
announcement and scan it. Circle the date in 
a paint program and print the announcement. 
The final step is to cut and adhere to a blank 
note card with matching envelopes. 

4. Fast ft: for affordable save the- date cus- 
toms, postcards are both easy and classy. Web 
sites like VistaprtnKom have inexpensive cus- 
tom postcards. The site has templates as well 
as the capability to upload custom designs. As 
a plus, you'll save on postage. 

5. Attracted like magnets: When your 
guests see a reminder of your big day every 
time they open their refrigerator, you can be 
assured they wont forget. There are several 
Web sites that print custom magnets and 
printable magnet sheets, but the easiest way 
to make a save trie-date card magnetic is to 
use magnets designed to turn business cards 
into magnets. Available at office supply stores, 
they are easy to use. Most word processors 
have downloadable business card templates 
that can be used to create your announcement 
in the proper dimensions. For a fun twist print 
an old refrigerator on a note card and stick the 
magnet to it. 







7/7/07 




6 



\ 






tf 




We are «o glad to hgve 

you in our lives and wart 

to zo be part of our big 

day, Fleaee mark your 

calendars for our June 7, 

2007, weddlrvg and keep 

that day open eo you can 

spend it with ue. 

Love, 
Emily & Anthony 



Our Guest 
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Anytown, K.S 12345 












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Pages 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Friday, Dec. 1,2006 



INSURANCE | Co-payments, deductibles differ 



Continued from Page 1 

after the $500 deductible is 
paid. 

The MEGA Life plan has 
an out-of-pocket maximum of 
51,500 per year After that is 
reached, the insurance compa- 
ny will pay the rest of the bill. 

The lifetime maximum is 
$100,000 per year, and must be 
purchased annually. Medical 
>ills will not be paid by the in- 
surance after the policyholder's 
bills reach $100,000 in a year. 

After a student graduates, 
i he insurance is dropped. 

However there are benefits 
to the MEGA Life plan, said 
'red Brock, author of "Health 
Care on Less Than You Think" 
and assistant professor of jour- 
nalism and mass communica- 
tions. 

"The best part about the uni 
versity plan is that it will accept 
you even if you have pre-exist- 
ing conditions," he said. 

Elmore said he considered 
buying the insurance plan after 
he was no longer insured. 

"I looked into it, but then 
[ thought that $800 couldve 
went lo something else rather 
than insurance," he said. 

STUDENT HEALTH 
INSURANCE 

The Time Insurance plan is 
available for students enrolled 
in a college or university and is 
separate from the plan offered 
solely to Kansas Board of Re- 
gents students. 

This student health insur- 
ance plan can be found on 
eHealthhisurance.com. a Web 
site that presents health insur- 



ance information for consum- 
ers. The cost is $829 per year. 

This insurance reimburses 
policyholders (or medical ser- 
vice regardless of who provides 
the service, although this re- 
imbursement might be limited 
The deductible is $1,000 per 
year 

Co-payments are not re- 
quired in this plan, but prescrip- 
tion drugs are not covered. 

The co-insurance is 20 per- 
cent of all medical bills after 
the $1,000 deductible The in- 
surance company will begin to 
pay 80 percent of medical ex- 
penses after the policyholder 
pays $1,000 in medical bills. 

When the plans $3,000 out- 
of-pocket maximum is reached, 
the insurance company pays 
100 percent of a bill. This limit 
includes the $1,000 deductible 

This plan has a lifetime 
maximum of $1 million. 

Brock said the plan is a 
good option because it covers 
students after graduation 

"This plan will cover stu 
dents until they are 30 years 
old, and by that time they can 
find insurance through their 
job, which most of them will 
do," he said. 

HEALTH SAVINGS 
ACCOUNT 

Humana offers a health in- 
surance plan that allows poli- 
cyholders to save while pay- 
ing for their health insurance. 
Health savings accounts are 
linked to a tax-free savings ac- 
count that can be used to pay 
medical bills before the deduct- 
ible is met and (he insurance 
kicks in. 



This plan costs about $1,148 
per year or $95.64 per month 
and also can be found on 
eHealthinsurance.com. The de- 
ductible is $2,600, which also is 
the maximum amount a policy- 
holder can invest in this HSA 

Investment options are up 
to the consumer, Brock said. 

Money from this account 
cannot pay the premium or the 
plan's cost However, this mon- 
ey can be withdrawn for non- 
medical expenses If a policy- 
holder chooses this option, he 
or she must pay taxes on that 
money and a 10- percent pen- 
alty on the amount withdrawn. 

There is a co-insurance of 20 
percent, and the out-of-pocket 
maximum is $2,000. 

This plan has a lifetime max- 
imum of $5 million per person 
for the policyholder's lifetime. 

Brock said an HSA plan is 
beneficial because it can help a 
policyholder save money. 

For example, if the deduct- 
ible is $2,000, a policyholder 
would invest $2,000 into his or 
her HSA account to help cover 
medical expenses. 

"The only reason you would 
use (hat is to pay for medical 
expenses thai arc part of the 
deductible." Brock said. "The 
only way that it would be bad 
is if you had more medical ex- 
penses than your deductible, 
but most people don't have 
that," Brock said. 

For young, healthy people, 
the HSA can be a smart choice. 
Brock said 

"If you don't buy student 
health insurance, it's not thai 
much more expensive, and you 
can keep it forever." he said. 



PAGEANT | Contestants prepare for 3 months 



Continued from Page 1 

cash prize and advances to a 
regional competition that in- 
cludes 10 other states. From 
there, she can advance to the 
national competition. Glad 
ney said. 

Although the pageant 
is competitive, Margaret 
Turner, choreographer and 
co-pageant coordinator, said 
she emphasizes sisterhood 
while training the women for 
the competition 

"After every practice, me 
and the girls talk about any 
issues they may have with 
school, and then we close by 
getting in a circle and having 
prayer," Turner said 

Turner, who was the Classy 
Cat coordinator in 1995, said 
she critiques the women's 
talent and gives suggestions, 
but she only coordinates the 
group choreography. 



One of Turner's most 
memorable moments from 
the pageant was a contestant, 
Megan Smith, who competed 
in the pageant four times, fi- 
nally winning it in her senior 
year. 

The next year, Turner said 
Smith was instrumental in 
organizing the pageant. A* 
an apparel and textile major, 
she designed and sewed the 
contestant's outfits for the 
opening act. 

"It is really interesting and 
a blessing to see a girl who's 
shy and can't even walk in 
heels, turn into a completely 
different person the night of 
the pageant," Turner said. 

Brittany Foster, sopho- 
more in apparel textile and 
contestant in this year's pag- 
eant, said the hardest part 
of preparing for the pageant 
was finding a balance be- 
tween practice, class, extra- 



curricular activities and time 
for herself. 

The contestants practice 
four hours a night, three 
nights a week, for three 
months, Foster said. 

"We don't just put the girls 
up on stage; we do it with 
class. They put lots of time 
and effort into this pageant, 
and it shows," Clark said 
"We have one night to make 
Forum Hall into something 
spectacular." 

Tickets are $10 and can 
be purchased for the event 
from a contestant or Alpha 
Phi Alpha member before 5 
p.m. today. They can be pur 
chased at the door for $15. 




A LOT CAN BE SAID 
ABOUT A UTTLE 
BIT OF SPACE. 



WORKS 




To give it a try, 

call or stop by 

Collegian advertising 

103 Kedzie 532-6560 




^776-5577® 

^ <-> 



NEW: AGGIEVILLE PICK-UP STATION 

(Calling for cab from Aggieville not necessary) 



Two ways to get a ride home! 

• Aggieville Pick-up Station 
at the 12th & Bluemont Willie's Car Wash 

• Call 539-0480 if not in the Aggieville area 



Every Weekend! 

Thursday, Friday, and Saturday 

11pm -3am 



A free service provided by the K State SGA 



Presents 



3&1 1 1 1» 



( it'll / fi-iintif 's i I uh 




December 1, 2006 
4:45 PM 




Varney s in 

Aggieville (end) 



Please join us. The walk is free! 



Thanks to Varney s 8 Planet Sub! 

Sponsored by SHAPE (Sexual Health Awareness Peer 

Educators), Lafene Health Center & the K-State Health, 

Communicable Disease and Safety Committee 



Famous Contortionist 

Thurs. Nov. 30th 
Fri. Dec. 1 st 
Sat. Dec. 2nd 



2006 Texas Most 

Erotic Feature 

2005 Miss Nude 

New Jersey 

2004 Stripper 

Magazine Cover Giff 



ared in: 
Cherry 



CLASSIFIEDS 



To place an advertisement call 



Friday, Dec. 1,2006 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 9 



I I l I || || 

I 1 !! >■ J.L" s: u 'J : 



■ i 1 1 ii • 
• ii i ■ i ■ ■ 




LET'S RENT 




ONE-BEDROOM NO 

smoker* 1021 Fremont 
IMS utilities Included. 
January Imh Monday- 
Friday 785-778-4005 



FOUR-BEDROOM. 
bath Fenced 
gareg* 

785-317-7713 



CLASSIFIED ADS 

let them work for you 

Kansas State collegian 

785-532-6655 




Bulletin Bom d 



NICE THREE -BED- 
ROOM, on* bath avail- 
able January Id. No pel* 
$880/ month. Yard, 
garage, close to campus 
Lot* ot slot age 
785-537-7354 

LEARN TO FLY1 K-Stale ONE-BEOROOM. walk to 
Flying Club has rtv* alt- class No drinking, Smok- 




. planes and lowest rales 
Cat 785-776-1744. www- 
; ksu edurVsJc 




Loci and found ads can 
be placed trae for three 
days 



FOUND l-POD 
pus. Call to 
913-526-9175. 



QtTcam- 
dMMlta 



ing. or pats. 785-539-1554. 

THREE, FOUR, FIVE, SIX 
PLUS BEDROOMS Look 
Ing tor that perfect liome 
to rent? Great selection 
and prices. Capstone 
Management 
785-341-0656 

THREE- SEVEN-BED- 
ROOM houses near cam- 
pus lor nexl year June/ 
August leases an have 
central air, full kitchens, 
and washer/ dryer. Call 
now for best selection. 
785-341-1897 

BEDROOM 
Available Jan- 

2007. Close to 
No pat*. Cat 



FEMALE SUBLEASER 
needed Immediately 

Close to campus, off- 
street parking $400 s 
month utilities included 
913-961-0673 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 
Rent $255 plus 
Off-street parking, 
washer/ dryer, no pats, no 
smoking, lour -bedroom 
house Katie 

785-230-7266 

FEMALE 



COMMUNICATIONS ANA- 
LYST position available at 
Steel a Pipe Supply Co 
Qualified candidate win be 
able to manage IP and 
Legacy Phone Systems , 
Candidate wilt be respon- 
sible tor management of 
all Communication con- 
tracts, maintenance con- 
tracts, and service con- 
tracts Attention to detail 
and ability lor thorough 
documentation is desired. 
General IP networking ex- 
perience and wMtngnaaa 
to leam new technology is 
required Interested candi- 
dates should submit re- 
sume to Personnel Depart- 
ment. Communications 
Analyst, PO Bon 1666 
Manhattan. KS 66505 
Equal Opportunity Em- 
ployer 



EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 
Manhattan Area Habitat 
lor Humanity serves both 
the RUey County and Pot- 
tawatomie County ansa* 
in Kansas. Th* Executive 



ate't dally operations and 
resource development. In- 
creasing tundraising ef- 
forts In order to sustain 
the organization as a vi- 
able community resource. 
Supervision of one part- 
lime staff person also re- 
quired Responsibilities in- 
clude the knptementatlon 
ot policies, procedures 



Community Care Home < ,m • m ■ R,Sto ™> Q""" 1 



SUBLEASERS NEEDED 
spring 2007 lor three-bed- 
room, one and one half 

bath apartment, one Competitive wage, flexible 
scheduling Contact 

Nancy. Highway 99 and 
Main Westmoreland 

785-457-2801 

DIRECTOR 



by th* Board of Director* 
(end reccommend same] 
perseverance ot public ac- 
countability, and providing 
assistance to committees 
(Church Relations. Family 



lor sublease m three-bed- 
room, one bath tor Spring 
semester One block from 
Aggievilla 917 Moro 
SUBLEASER $330/ month, 

wanted to share four-bed- 786-317-1263 

Two - 



mmule walk to campus 

$760 per month ot $260 

per person plus electricity. 

Contact: dgray®ksuedu 

or 913 481-1334. cTeaTTvE" 

FHREE ROOMS avatable CivicPius is the nations 
leading provider of City. 
County, and School web- 
sites. This Is a full-time. 
Manhattan based posi- 
tion You will be In charge 
of directing the creative 



PART-TIME Fumttur* De- 
livery Position*: FlenJbt* 
work schedule, great pay. 
Stop by A Fun House. 601 
3 5th Street. 

7I6-B3740M 

PART-TIME PERSONAL 
care attendant needed for 
a 19 year old lemate 
Wishing to attend Kansas 
State fMs January Duties 
would Include assisting 
dressing In the morning 
and evenings II Inter - 
ailed call 620-375-2200 

PROGRAMMER CIVIC- 
PLUS is th* nations lead- 
ing provider of city, county 
and school websites Full 
• time position in Manhat- 
tan, Mleroaoft ASP or 
SQL experience required. 
$14 50/ hour plus health, 
denial, paid holidays, paid 
vacation and 40i(k) 
matching. Email resume 
In Microsoft Word or text 
format to jobaiSotvleplus.- 



FOR SALE: Sal water 
nanowreath aquarium 
$200 or best offer Call 
785-395-5074 

NEW 52-Inch RCA HDTV. 
stui in box $900 or b**t of- 
fer 308-325-0668 leave 



Deadlines 



Classified ads must be 
placed by noon th* day 
before you went your ad 
to run Classified display 

ads must be placed by 
4 p.m. two working days 

prior to th* date you 

want your ad to run. 



GUI 785-532-6555 




I mi i spurt, ilii n> 




room/ two bath apartment 
First month free, $315/ 
month Available now 
through July 2007 
907-232-4601 ^^ Call 

Male sublease 620-242-6451 



process, including brain- 
storming with stall, meet- 
ing with customers and 
providing the creative 




FEMALE Sub- 
(easers needed lor six- 
bedroom house. AH bills 

includBd indent. $329 per J£,' necessaryto give our 
Lindsay cm^n^r, outstanding 
^_ and award winning web- 
wanted lor January 2007 TWO- BED ROOMS AVAIL silos Salary oommensu- 
to August Close to cam- ABL£ |n n(ce lou,.^. rate with experience Ben- 
pus/ AggievWe $290 plus foom apartment. Big elite include health, den- 



cations include a passion 
tor Habitat tor Humanity's 
mission : proven expert, 
ance In a non-profit organi- 
zation (administration. 
grant writing, creating and 
maintaining community re- 
lationships, tundraising), 
excellent interpersonal. 
written and verbal skills: 
and the ability to handle 
multiple tasks, meet dead- 
lines, speak publicly, and 
participate as a team 
player. A familiarity with 
home construction la a 
pkia Exceptional account- 
ing skills and finance un- 
derstanding are required. 
This w a Ihree-lourths SYSTEMS ANALYST po- 
ll me position: compensa- alUon available at Steel 4 



1990 CHEVY Blazer 
LOTS ot recent work, run* 
great l $2000 or Best Offer 
795-226-1620 

FOR SALE Ford Taurus 
2004. excellent condition 
Asking price $7,500 or 
beat after 785-313-6366 



STUDENT OFFICE Aasls- 
tant needed In a last- 
paced, often high traffic 
business office Must 
have good working knowl- 
edge of Word and Excel. 
Must be e **tl-mottvaled. 
quick learner with a good 
attention to details and 
proofreading, previous of- 
fice experience highly pre- 
lerred Apply in Kerizie 
103 and Include spring 
2007 schedule. 



RETIRING FACULTY sell- 
ing, low mileage Mitsubishi 
2000 Mirage excellent 
condition 38,600 miles 
Manual. an -conditioner, 
stereo. $4200 

785-532-7176 Office. 

785-776-9505 
7msrsoc@ksu adu 




uHtitius 
913-775-2083 

MAtT 



Call 




Employment Careers 



Manhattan CITY Ordi- 
nance 4814 assure* ev- 
ery parson equal opportu 
n tty In housl ng without dl s- 
tinctton on account of 
race, sax, familial statu*. 
military statu*, disability, 
llgton, age, color, na- 
tional origin or ancestry. 
Violations should be re- 
' ported to th* Director of 
Human Resource* at City 
Hall, (785)5*7-2440. 




' MANHATTAN CITY Ordi- 
nance 4814 assures ev- 
ery parson equal opportu- 

| n Ity In housing without dls- 

> Unction on account Of 
| race, sex, familial stilus. 

military status, disability, 

• religion, age, color, na- 
, llonal origin or anceetry. 

Violations should be re- 
| ported to the Director of 
. Human Resource* at City 

• Hall. (785)567-2440. 

> CHEAT TWO-BED- 
', ROOM, dose to campus, 
i newly remodeled. ofl- 
1 street parking. $650. avail 

', able December 1 . call 
7 85- 320-6300 

LARGE TW0-BED- 
ROOM great open 
kitchen, dose to campus, 
oft-streat parking, laundry 
lacility $720. available 
January, call 
785-320-6300 

ONE OR TWO-BED- 
ROOMS available now or 
January 1. Only a lew left. 
I $295 and up, Hurry! Cap- 
stone Management 
785-341-0666 



FEMALE ROOMMATE 
needed lor tour-bedroom 
house $350/ month pais 
electricity. gas, SBC 
Outel. nice house, major 
appliance* included 

765-587-9207, 
7 85-230-30O8 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
needed immediately 

Clean newly remodeled 
three-bedroom, two bath 
house, garage available, 
washer/ dryer. Can 
785-620-7612 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted lor three-bedroom 
house $300. utilities paid. 
fa 




tall 765-537-4947 



screen, bar, 
month, lun 
SUBLEASER January t 

needed in January $300 913-909-2276 

per month, plus one-third 

utilities Three bedroom, 

two bath Call 

785-342-2932. 

MALE SUBLEASER 
needed Spring 2007. 
close lo campus. $300 
per month plus one halt 
utilities. Please call Bran- 
don Bayless 
785-230-0512. 

male SUBLEASER 

wanted Close to campus, 
washer and dryer four- 
bedroom, rent $370. 
Needed by January. 
785-262-0899 

6NE-BEDR06*ri NICE 

apartment three minutes 
tram campus. No pets. 
$450 per month Call 
913-534-0874 available 
December to August 
ONE-BEDROOM SUB 
LEASE. Rent reduced. 
Pets allowed. Available 
December 20. 

316-617-5662. 



Can 



deck. $250/ tal. paid holidays, paid va- 
atmosphere cation and 40 IK match- 
ing Email resume m Mi- 
crosoft Word or text for- 
mat to (ObsiScivicpius - 
com. include cover letter 
explaining your capabili- 
ties. 

$2500+ 



FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted to share large ONE-BEDROOM WITH a 
apartment Two mites tuH bath available In a two- 
Irom campus. Available pedfo^ apartment. Fur- 
mid-December. No Smok- nijj^g; c^ie no pels. 
Ing/ pets. $305 plus one- w **her/ dryer. Cntv $375/ 
hall utilttes. Can ^^^ Immediately' 
402-525-794 7 785-31 7-6313. 
ROOMMATE JJuiET 



ON L BEDROOM 
to campus $360 
able December 
785-587-0399 



Close 

Avail. 
1st. 



FEMALE 
wanted who loves pets 
and is neat, quiet, and re- 
sponsible Rent $310/ 
month including utilities. 
Private bath First month 
tree with January start. 
Call 785-537-8807 lor de- 
tails. 

FfnATP" TOBMTnttTTSl 

non- smoking, to break, 
train, show horses, etc 
lor rent Prefer veterinar- 
ian, animal science ma- 
jors PO Box 1211, Man- 
hattan, KS 66505 

FEMALE STUDENT to 
share new home with re- 
tired KSU lacutty in return 
lor household chores 
785-539-6872 

RESPONSIBLE 
MATE wanted, 
neighborhood two 
from campus Washer/ 
dryer No pets. $275/ 



THE COLLEGIAN cannot 
verify the financial poten- 
tial of advertisement* In 
the Employment/Career 
classification. Reader* 
are advised lo approach 
any auch business oppor- 
tunity with rea- 
sonable cau- 
tion. The Collegian urges 
our reader* to contact th* 
Belter Business Bureeu, 
501 SE Jefferson. 
Topeka. KS 666071190. 

1 785)2 32- 0454 . 

4 61WF5 Win. Bar now 
hiring lunch coolti. Flexi- 
ble hours, competitive 
pay Apply in person 3033 
Anderson Avenue. 

AflMiMisiiuiiv'fcAyyib- 

TANT Jom our profes- 
sional team as we Intro- 
duce CivicPius E-Govem- 
meni innovations to Cites 



EARN $2500+ monthly 
and more to type simple 
ads online, wwwdataen- 
frytypers com 

eAHM Hrjfl - JIM a 
month to drive brand new 
cars with ads placed on 
them www AdDriveTeam - 
com. 



lion dependent upon quail 
ficalions and experience 
Applications available by 
contacting JoAnn R Sut- 
ton, President, by calling 
76S-341-4225. email Sut- 
ton Wrnhaks org. or by ws- 
ttmg the web at www.man- 
hattanareahabitat org Ap- 
plications must include a 
minimum ot three refer- 
ences Resumes and writ- 
ten correspondence 
should be mailed to 
Jo Ann R Sutton, Presi- 
dent. 1800 Donholm 
Drive, Manhattan 
66603 
FIRST 



Pipe Supply Co. Qualilied 
candidate will be able to 
accurately troubteshoot 
hardware and software is- 
sues and provide detailed 
technical assistance lo 
the end user tor all PC 
and peripheral systems 
Cisco networking. Mi- 
crosoft Server. and 
VMWare experience is 
preferable. Two ■ Five 
years experience and or 
education in Server or Net- 
work Management la re- 



quired. Interested candi- 

Kansas dates should submit re- 

aume to Personnel Depart- 

MANAGEMENT m e nt - Systems Analyst. P- 
has a part-time leasing O. Box 1688 Manhattan, 
agent position available Kansas 66505. Equal co- 
lor a busy apartment com- portunlty fasiployer 
munity Qualified appli- TELEPHONY TECHNI- 
carvts must have reliable ciAN The Phone Connec- 
transponation, a willing- tlon is a last growing 
nass to work a varied VQKe networking (VOIP) 
schedule. It is required to company m need of Tele- 
be able to work full time pnor1 y Technictarta in 



Travel Trips 



#1 SPRING Break Web- 
site 1 Low Prices Guaran- 
teed. Group discounts tor 
6* Book 20 people, get 3 
free tripal wwwSprtng- 
Breakdtscounts.com or 
800-538-5202 

DON! MISS out! Spring 
Break 2007 is approach- 
ing and STS is ottering 
specials lo this year's 
hottest destinations I Call 
for MeaVl 

1-S00-548-4649 or visit 
www. sts1ravel.com . 



Got old 
stuff? 



0HC-M6R00U 

across from campus $500 and Countries across the 
a month. Water, gas. and US. This challenging post- 
trash paid Available m i^n requires the ability lo 
January 785-317 -2186 handle multiple tasks and 
NEEDeT priorities white maintain- 
ing a positive and ener- 



SUBLEASER 

tor a six -bedroom house. 
Close to campus. $260 a 
month plus one- sixth ot 
utilities January through 
May 913-709-2246 

SUBLEASER NEEDED 
for Spring 2007 semester 
$315 per month Four-bed- 
room apartment January 
rent part 785-418-1778 

SU BLE AS t ((""HeTdTd*- 

January 1 . One-bedroom 
apartment Close to Ag- 
gievine and campus. Rent 
$450/ month Call 

913-909-2117 

wanTEB 



ROOM 

^ SUBLEASER 

as soon as possible Nice 
house close to campus 
$350/ month {witting to 

TWO BEDROOM BY City """J **£?£?.£* **> ♦ «*** utlltt * 5 

Park with off-street park " es * m 785 "* 



Ing and laundry $600, 
available January, call 
785-320-6300. 
TWO-BEDROOM ONfc 
and one-half bath apart- 
ment in quwt neighbor- 
hood Available Jan 1, 
1420 Beechwood Ter- 
race. $710/ month. 785- 
341-9898, rosswil - 

googlepages.oom 

TWO-BEDROOM 



ROOMMATE NEEDED 
$325 per month, plus utili- 
ties Across street from 
campus, oft- street park. 
Ing Available January 
2007- August 2007 
753-439-8926. 

ROOMMATE 



Call Brandi at 
785-448-0239 or email 
bbuzzard®ksu edu 

SUBLEASER WANTED 
tor Catholic women's 
house Two blocks from 
campus. $310/ monlh In- 
cludes: utilities, food, rent. 



getic attitude $12/ hour, 
Full-time only, opportu ni- 
nes lor advancement E- 
mail resume In Microsoft 
Word Of Text torrnat to: 
lobs <£' civicplu scorn 

APPLICATION SUPPORT 
Analyst position available 
at Steel & Pipe Supply 
Position is responsible for 
business process design, 
lasting, training, and sup- 
port. Oualil cations in- 
clude B.S m business, 
computer science, or re- 
lated liekl Must have gen- 
eral knowledge of busi- 
ness processes Inter- 
ested candidates should 
submit resume to Person- 
nel Department. App Sup- 
port Analyst. PO Box 
1688, Manhattan, Kansas 
66505. Equal Opportunity 
Employer 

?Rr5 



School and work 

driving you crazy? 

1 'heck the 

Collegian 

classifieds to find 

out where you can 

go to gel away 

from it all 

tor the weekend or 

tor a holiday break. 

You can get away 

quicker than you 

think. 



. 



from Juty 23rd through Au- 
gust 6th for apartment 
turnover. Please apply at 
our Chase Manhattan 
Apartment location, 1409 
Chase Place, (comer ol 
College and Clallirv) No 



Salina, Manhattan. 

Topeka and Kansas City. 
Positive attitude, profes- 
sionalism, strong work 
ethic and one or more 
years ol telephone or com- 
puter network support ex- 



phone calls please. Equal pedence or equivalent 
Opportunity Employer^ _ training is required. Bene- 
fits Include Health, Dental. 
Paid Holidays. Paid Vaca- 
tion, Paid Training and 401 - 
ik) matching. E-mail re- 
sum* to jobs@tpcks com 
in Microsofl Word or T«xt 
format. 



RID 



GRAPHIC DESIGNER 
CivicPius is the nations 
leading provider of city, 
county and school web- 
sites. Both full-time and 
work-at-homa (contract) 
positions are available 
FuMrn* benefits include ^^^^~ ^^™ ^^^^ 
health, dental. pa«l H* weB DESI0NEH - *"<"<> 
days, paid vacation and winning 
40t(k) matching. Email agency, 
resume and design sam 



pies lo jobs@clvlcplus.com 



HARRY'S 

DISHWASHER 
Shifts 10am • 
Mon-Wed-Frl 



DAYTIME 

NEEDED. 

3pm on 

and/ or 



1 mage makers, 
seeks full-time web devel- 
oper/ web designer. Some 
training provided. Apply at 
www wamegowork com. 



APPLICATIONS 
G RAMMER position avail- 
able at Steel ft Pipe Sup- 
ply Primary (unction is to 
yJ^JJy^™ Live in dorms'' May work develop reports, applica- 



one 

and one-halt bath, close 
to campus, off-atreet park- 
ing. $625, available Jan- 
uary, call 785-320-6300 

TWO- BEDROOM. ONE 
bath, short term possible 
Spacious CICo Park 
area Appliances, central 
air. Water/ trash paid 
Deck, oft-street parking 
No pets Available Jan- 
uary $525 
785-537-8420. 
785-341-5346. 
TWO-BEDROOM/ ONE 
bath town ho use $850 00 
new construction Also 
Iwo-bedroorrV two bath 
apartmenl near the mall. 
call Wildcal Property at 
785-537-2332 
UPSCALE ONEBED- 
ROOM, close to campus 
on-site laundry and fit- 
ness, gated parking 
$700, available January, 
call 785-320-6300 



lor a two-bedroom house 
All appliances supplied 
Call 785-332-6152 ask tot 
Erica 

ROOMMATE WANTED 
lor Spring Semester Nice 
house, close to campus 
Pets welcome 

820-362 7241. 

SUBLET APARTMENT to 
August University Cross- 
ing Non-dnnker, great 
roommate, as soon as 
possible 913-709-8434 




TWO-BEDROOM ONE 
bath $275 each, plus utili- 
ties One block from cam- 
pus. Need two spring sub- 
IMMN Call 

620-874-5900 ask tor 
Bryan Armendartz 



deal' Call 785-366-6342 

SUBLEASER WANTED 
One-bedroom one bath In 
two-bedroom two bath 
apartment $360 per 
month, furnished. Avail- 
able January 1. 
785-479-1235 or II- 
53355 tffksu edu 

SUBLEASER WANTED to 
m :im two-bedroom 
house. Clean, quiet neigh- 
borhood Washer/ dryer, 
off-street parking $400/ 
month, utilities Included 
913-656-1411. 

SUBLEASER WANTED. 
Close to campus washer/ 
dryer included $285/ 
month one-lourth utilities 
Pets ok Call 

785-275-1913 
SUBLEASER WANTED 
Located across from Ag- 
gieville and campus. Avail- 
able January 2007 to Au- 
gust. Renl negotiable 
1 ,111 Chris at 

785-527-3259 



tions. and internet func- 
tionality and support 
server and PC hardware/ 
software Qualifications In- 
clude Computer Science 
or related degree or five 
years equivalent experi- 
ence Detailed knowledge 
of JAVA. C, or C++ pro- 
gramming laguagea and 
added plus. Candidates 
should submit resume to 
Personnel Department, 
Applications Programmer, 
P.O. Box 1668. Manhat- 
tan, Kansas 66505 Equal 
opportunlly employer 

BARTENDING' $300 a 
day potential No experi- 
ence necessary Training 
provided Call 

1 -800-985-6520 ext 144 




Tues-Thurs Some night 
and/ or weekend availabil- 
ity. Apply in person at 418 
Poyntz Ave Good Pay. 

KANSAS WHEAT is seek- 
ing a part-time Records In- 
tern Requires knowledge 
ol Microsoft Access. Ex- 
cellent resume builder 1 
Send resume lo rJpster- 
son@kswheat.com Or 

Kansas Wheat, 217 South- 
wind Place. Manhattan, 
KS 66503. by December 
11. 2006 Equal Opportu- 
nity Employer 

MYSTERY SHOPPERS. 
Earn up to $150 Expan- 
ence not required. Under- 
cover shoppers needed to 
Judge retail and dining es- 
tablishments Call 
600-722-4791 

NETWORK TECHNICIAN 
Due to our recent expan- 
sion, Networks Plus has a 
new opening tor a full- 
time Computer Network 
Technician in Manhattan. 
Positive attitude, profes- 
sionalism, strong work 
ethic and one or mote 
year* ol computer support 
experience or equivalent 
training is required. E-mail 
resume to jobs ©network 
spkjs com in Microsoft 
Word or Text format 
Equal Opportunity Em- 
ployer 




Open Market 



FUTON FRAME- Do you 
have a good futon frame 
you need to get rid ol 7 
Give me a call I might 
just buy It 785-556-0652 



in the 

Kansas State 

i'olleuan 



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ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT | SEX | FOOD | YOUR LIFE 

THE EDGE 



Friday, Dec 1,2006 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 10 



Spice it up 



8 hot dates add flavor to any relationship 




fust about anyone could argue the im- 
portance of dating at any stage in your life. 
Whether you are tingle, in a relationship, 
engaged or married, the 
act of going out with a 
friend, boyfriend, girl- 
friend, fiance* or spouse al- 
low* for a healthy bonding 
experience. 

When a couple has 
been together for a long 
time, dates or outings 
might become humdrum, 
and it can turn into the 
following awful age-old 
battle: 

"What do you want to do tonight?" 

"I don't know. What do you want to do 
tonight?" 

"I dont know. I picked last time. It's your 
turn" 

Often when this argument occurs, the 
mood for the whole evening sours, feelings 
are hurt, and overall grouchiness prevails. 

Never fear. There are many ways to avoid 
this nasty brawl , and I encourage people 
to be as creative as possible to maintain a 
relationship. 

At a couple, sit down and try to come up 
with a list of random activities you might 
enjoy doing together. Try to get out of the 
normal swing of things. Step out of the col- 
lege atmosphere by avoiding conventional 
ideas like going to the bant, house parties 
or just hanging out with friends Consider 
activities that involve art, the great outdoors, 
food, film, travel, etc. Here are some things 
that would make for great dating alterna- 
tives you might not have considered. 

1 GET OUT OF TOWN 

Pack up the car and take a field trip 
Couples can drive to a nearby city like 
Lawrence or the Kansas City area for a day 
trip. When you're out of your Manhattan 
comfort zone, you're more likely to pay 
more attention to one another. Touring 
another location will be a refreshing change 
of scenery for both of you. 

) SWATHE FRESH AIR 

Plan a trip to the too, take a stroll in the 
park, follow a walking trail, or explore your 
local cemetery Sunset Zoological Park is an 
excellent location to visit The zoo is open 
noon to 5 p m. Admission is $4 for adults, 
$2 for children ages 3-12, and free for chil- 
dren under 2 years old. 

Manhattan's ice rink, located in City 
Park, also offers a winter weather dating op- 
tion for those seeking adventure. The rink is 
open 3:30-8 p.m. weekdays On weekends, 
the rink opens at 1 p.m . both days and clos- 
et at 7 p.m. Saturdays and B p.m. Sundays. 
Admission and skate rental are $1.50 each 

Since we students spend so much time 
indoors with class and homework fresh air 
and exercise will improve mental and physi- 
cal health. 



1. BE CREATIVE 

Even if neither of you are fine arts 
majors, you still can find a way to enjoy art 
Buy a few tubes of paint, tome brushes and 
canvas, and go wild. Or take an art data 
together. You can learn a new trade together 
and express yourselves artistically at the 
same time. 

Art classes are offered at a number of 
locations in town. The Manhattan Arts Cen- 
ter offers classes for those who want to get 
creative. The center alto features music and 
performing arts events throughout the year. 
For more information, visit wwwmanhat- 
tanarts.org. 

4. INDULGE IN FOOD 

Cook an elaborate meal together. Be 
experimental and try to create something 
that's not part of your normal menu. 

5. MAKE EACH OTHER OVER 

Style each other's hair or clothing. This 
doesn't have to extend as far as scissors or 
hair dye, but it certainly could You'll both 
get a lock out of the stylet your significant 
other devises, and who knows, maybe you'll 
have a new 'do and a new stylist. If you're 
a girl, let your guy apply your makeup, and 
if you're a guy, let your girl shave your face. 
Or browse some of Aggjevule's smaller bou- 
tiques for clothing styles you might not find 
at the mall. 

6. BREAK OUT OF THE NORM 

Instead of going out, stay in and rent a 
movie. If you're feeling adventurous, find 
a foreign film with subtitles. The Manhat- 
tan Public Library offers free movie and 
DVD rentals If nothing else, you and your 
significant other can bond over the fact that 
neither of you can understand what the 
people in the movie are saying. 

7. CREATE A SCAVENGER HUNT 

Either the guy or girl in the relationship 
can create a fun scavenger hunt for the 
other with riddles and questions that will 
make your loved one travel around town. 
The quest could end with a romantic picnic 
atop one of Manhattan's many scenic over- 
looks. 

8. DRESS UP 

Whoever said prom dresses were re- 
served exclusively for prom? Find a fancy 
outfit from high school and go out for a 
night on the town. 

When couples come up with good date 
ideas, they can begin a collection or "date 
jar" with a plethora of ideas for when they 
don't know what to do. Hopefully this sort 
of preparation can end the "Wh at- should - 
we-do-tonight?" debate before it starts. 



HPs*p r™^p» w ■ W^Pi^W Iw ^Hn ^InMiflli r^HN ^BWw UawVr 




In: 



VQVNV3 




Reviewer approves alternative, simple albums 



The Slip's "Eisenhower ' 

Grade: A- 



Hem "Funnel Cloud" 
Grade: A- 



The Evens "Get Evens" 

Grade: B+ 



The Blow "Paper Television" 
Grade: B+ 




The Slip's first album with Bar/None 
Records and the band's second over- 
all studio effort it an echoing, thun- 
derous, jam -band epic and possibly 
the best album of its kind since the 
2003 release "Z" by My Morning 
Jacket, with whom The Slip will be 
touring soon 



"Funnel Cloud" is a beautiful, gentile 
whirlwind of alternative country-pop 
lullabies, sounding much like a Ryan 
Adams record if he were to hand the 
microphone over to a female vocal- 
ist In this case, the female vocalist b 
Sally Ellyson, who possesses a breathy, 
breezy whisper that has the ability to 
erupt when necessary, like in "Not Cal- 
ifornia," the album's signature track. 



Blending together Ian MacKaye's dry, 
crunching, baritone guitar riffs and 
the complex rhythms of Amy Fari- 
na's percussion. The Event' second 
album, "Get Evens," creates a sturdy 
song craft that resemble* that of Yo 
La Tengo 



This female duo creates a collec- 
tion of simple, electronics, indie- 
pop tunes with marching-band 
beats. Khaela Maricich's deep, cut- 
ting lyrics beautifully contrast with 
her innocent sounding voice. 



MOVIE TIMES 

■ Tmsms *ar tsdaf threat* Sandfly. 

■ denotes tints Blaring Saturday and 
Sunday snfy, 

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This is i drama ttiat focuses on the period in 
Mary and Joseph's lift when they journeyed to 
Bethlehem for the birth of Jesus. 




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(1:45). *»,£«, MS 

Taj Mahal Badalandabad learns Coolidge College 
for the halls of Camtord University, where he looks 
to continue his education am) teach an uptight 
student how to make the most of hb academic 
career. 




"S: Turtstii,' K S5 min. 
(1:00,3:15), 5JQ, 7*5, 1(W0 

Young backpackers' vacation turns sour when 
a bus accident leaves them marooned In a 
remote Brazilian jungle that contains an 
ominous secret. 




ft:W,W0J,SJS,7J5.M0 

This is the story of a friendship that changes 
the course of rock history forever, of the fateful 
coition of minds between IB and KG that led to 
the creation of the precedent -shattering band 
Tenacious 0, and of the two heroes' quest to find 
the fabled Guitar Pick Of Destiny. 

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k /^K A N S A S STATE 

« Collegian 



INSIDE 

Check out some 

fashionable gifts 
for family 
and friends. 




wwwJuUtKoUegian.com 



Monday, December 4, 2006 



Beyond color 



A look at the lives of interracial couples reveals 
triumphs, downfalls on road to acceptance 




Lindsay Got! | COLLEGIAN 
EJ. Artvold, Mnlor In milling management, and Audra Gardanar, sanlor In apparel textile marketing, said they get double-takes from people 
because they are an interracial couple. 



By lacey D. Mackey 

KANSAS STATUOILEGMN 

It's been 40 yean since the US Supreme Court overturned laws 
against interracial marriage in the case of Loving v. Virginia 
But are we now colorblind to mixed -race couples? 
The United States has a history riddled with fighting racial segre- 
gation and laws enforcing social boundaries. Jim Crow laws, state and local 
regulations enforcing the segregation of race in the South and throughout 
the United States, were in place in the country from the late 1800s through 
1967. 

The U .S. population recently passed 300 million According to the 2000 
U.S. Census, there are about 54.5 million married couples in the country 
More than 4 million couples are mixed-race couples. 

Here are the stories of five couples, As individuals, they have different 
backgrounds, beliefs and cultures. As couples, they fight to break the mold 
and see love without seeing color. 

RAMONA AND EMANUEL . 

Ramona and Emanuel Arnold met at a discotheque in Germany in 1973 
and have been together ever since. 

Even after 30 years of marriage, the difference in their races is some- 
thing they overcome daily Ramona is German Emanuel is black. 

Emanuel was in the Army when he met Ramona. He said he never 
heard any objections from his friends about their relationship, although he 



suspected they had a different outlook on life than most 

Emanuel said his family accepted Ramona immediately, but even if race 
had been an issue, he decided long ago to accept people as they are 

"I made a decision as a teenager," he said, "I don't see color when I talk 
to people. A person is a person." 

Ramona's mother was a refugee from Poland, and her father originally 
was from Romania. Ramona said her parents already had experienced cul- 
tural differences when they were together. When she and Emanuel began 
their relationship, no issue arose from her parents except a genuine con- 
cern for their daughter's well-being. 

"My mother said, 'Are you sure you want to do this? You're going to 
have so many problems," Ramona said. 

People will look, Ramona and Emanuel said, but the couple said they 
have always sought to be around people who are accepting. 

"We kind of moved in circles where it was acceptable," Ramona said. "It 
was OK, and we were so much younger then, and we didn't care 

"We were going to do what we were going to do. 1 think it just drew us 
closer together" 

AUDRA AND EJ. 

Ramona and Emanuel live in Manhattan and have two sons. 
One of their suns, E.J. Arnold, senior in milling management, said he has 
seen his parents break new ground in their relationship. 

See dating Page 8 



Choirs, bell ringers perform holiday music numbers 



By Hannah Sanders 

KANSAS STAIKMLEdl AN 

All Faiths Chapel was filled with 
holiday music Sunday afternoon. 

The K-State Singers, Cadence, Men 
and Women's Glee clubs, Rhapsody 
Ringers and two organists performed a 
holiday song compilation. Gerald Pol- 
ich directed the vocal choirs, and Judy 
Scharmann directed the bell choir. 

K-State Women's Glee performed 
five songs, including Christmas favor- 
ites like "Silent Night." 

"I enjoy it, because it's a class that 
helps me relax," said Nakayla Kobbs. 
sophomore in animal science and 
member of the Women's Glee. 

The Women's Glee has class twice 
a week in addition to about an hour of 
individual practice to prepare for the 
concerts, Robbs said Her favorite song 



the club performed was "A Christmas 
Festival." 

The Men's Glee Club performed 
seven songs in a compilation of clas- 
sic holiday tunes and unusual choices 
like "Tomorrow Shall be My Dancing 
Day." 

Tyler Geisler, freshman in construc- 
tion science and management and 
member of the Men's Glee Club, said 
he enjoys being a part of the club. 

"It is a big stress reliever," Geisler 
said. 

He said his favorite song of the 
men's performance was "Noel!" 

"It has good rhythm between the 
parts, and it exemplifies the holiday 
spirit," Geisler said 

The K-State Singers, a more selec 
live choir of students who sing and 
dance, performed three songs with a 
small jazz band 




Catrina Rawton | COLLEGIAN 

The K-State Singers perform Sunday during a holiday performance that 
included Singers, Cadence, Rhapsody Ringers, the Men's and Women's Glee 
clubs and organists at All Faiths Chapel. K-State Singers performed three 
holiday songs dunng the afternoon performance. 



Vol 111. No. 72 



K-State to face 
No. 16 Rutgers 




K-State vs. Rutgers 

Time: 7 pjn Dec. 28 

Where: FWiant St. 

Houston 

Tflerhion: NFL Network 

K-State's (kket aHotment: 

10,500 

rtfrt prices: $«-$7S 



in Texas Bowl 



By Jonathan Garten 

KANSAS 51ATK0UKWK 

The K-State football team will be 
spending its holiday season in Texas this 
year. However, it won't be playing in the 
Alamo Bow) 

Instead, the Wildcats (7-5) will face 
No. 16 Rutgers (10-2) in the Texas 
Bowl on Dec. 
28, said Tim 
Weiser, di- 
rector of the 
Department 
of Intercolle- 
giate Athlet- 
ics. The game 
will be played 
at Reliant Sta- 
dium in Hous- 
ton. 

The Alamo 
Bowl selected 
fourth out of the Big 12 Conference's 
eight bowl games. It chose Texas to rep- 
resent the Big 12 and play Iowa. 

According to a Nov 24 article in The 
Kansas City Star, the Alamo Bowl had 
high interest in selecting either K-State 
or Texas Tech to fill it* Big 12 commit- 
ment. 

Weiser said the Insight and Indepen- 
dence Bowls also expressed interest in 

See BOWL Paoel 



Student dies 
Thursday night; 
cause unknown 



By Leann Sullen 
KANSAS SHTE COLLEGIAN 

A K-State graduate student in geogra- 
phy died Thursday 

Mary Dobbs, 44, died in her sleep 
Thursday night, said Richard Marston. 
head of the Department of Geography. 

Marston said Sunday evening the 
cause of Dobbs' death is unknown. 

The Department of Social Sciences at 
Emporia State University, where Dobbs 
worked as a teacher, first heard of Dobbs' 
death Friday afternoon from her ex-hus 
band, said Ellen Hansen, chair of the de- 
partment at Emporia State Hansen then 
told K-State. 

Lisa Harrington, professor of geog- 
raphy, was Dobbs' doctoral adviser She 
said she had a comfortable relationship 
with Dobbs 

"She was about the hardest worker 
1 ever met," Harrington said. "She jug 
gled taking care of her family as a single 
mother, working as a student at K-State 
and teaching at Emporia State" 

Dobbs was the mother of three chil- 
dren and an instructor of geography at 
Emporia State University. 

"She was a very sweet person. She 
was very enthusiastic about teaching at 
Emporia State," Hansen said 

Dobbs was the first doctoral student 
in the K-State geography department to 
receive a grant from the National Science 
Foundation to do research. Her research 
topic was The economic impact of the 
conservative reserve program on house- 
holds and counties in the Great Plains" 

As of Sunday evening, no information 
on a memorial service for Dobbs was 
available 



Today's forecast 

Sunny 
High: 46 Low: 20 



INSIDE 



Championship performance 

The K State women s basketball team used a bal 
anted offense and some stingy defense to capture 
the Commerce Bank Wildcat Classic championship 
Saturday night at Bramlage Coliseum. 
See story Page* 



CAMPUS NEWS HIGHLIGHTS 



Flu vaccine 

laferve Health Center received 
more flu vaccines. The vaccine can 
be given to those IS and older and 
rs now available to spouses and 
adult children of faculty, staff and 
students. The injection form of the 
vaccine is $14 For students and $19 
for guests It is $30 for students 
and $35 for guests for the nasal 
mist version. 



Faculty award 

Cristian Morosan, assistant 
professor in hotel, restaurant and 
institution management and 
dietetic, won the 2006 Dean 
Barbara $. Stowe Endowed Faculty 
Development fund Award from the 
College of Human Ecology. He will 
be honored at the fall 2006 com- 
mencement ceremony at 9 a.m. 
Dec. 9 in McCain Auditorium. 



Alumnus honor 

Dr Manuel Thomas will be honored 
by the College of Veterinary Medi- 
cine and the veterinary Medicine 
Alumni Association with the Alumni 
Recognition Award at the American 
Association of Equine Practitioners 
annual conference today In San 
Antonio, Texas. Thomas received 
his doctor of veterinary medicine 
degree from K-State in 1996. 



Opinion of Karl Rove by party 

KepuNwn^viewofllarttow6ba«a^ 

strategy to maintain control of the House and Senate InthayeartmidlermHecdon, 

LlAJal 

wpuWcins tnatptMMts Dtfwuiti 



- 



Page 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, Dec. A, 2006 



'Call 



776-5577 



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Puzzles | Eugene Sheffer 



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CAMPUS CHRONICLES 

Headlines from other universities 



FEMALE FOOTBALL PLAYER 
SIGNS COPIES OF BOOK 

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. - 
Turning her life story into a book 
has been a bittersweet experience 
for Katie Hnida. 

"It's kind of nice to have my 
story out there in my own words, 
because so much has been misre- 
ported, and people have all these 
opinions and different things," she 
said. "It's good to have it out there 
It's kind of funny to have your life 
story out there and all these things 
that are so personal, but at the 
same time, it is really good." 

Hnida, a former kicker for the 
University of New Mexico football 
team, signed copies of her book 



"Still Kicking: My Journey as the 
Fust Woman to Play Division I 
Football " at the Bookstore Thurs- 
day. 

The book chronicles her days 
playing at the University of Colo- 
rado and the abuse she said she 
suffered there and also recounts 
her time as a Lobo, where she 
said she was welcomed with open 
arms and treated like a teammate. 

OHIO STATE U, OFFERS 
FREE HIV TESTING 

COLUMBUS, Ohio - Each 
year 20.000 people under age 25 in 
the United States are infected with 
HIV, according to the Centers for 
Disease Control and Prevention. 



Even more startling is that one 
in 251 college students are HIV- 
positive, and 90 percent of them 
do not know it 

The Student Wellness Center 
is working to change that by offer- 
ing free HIV testing. Free anony- 
mous HIV testing and counseling 
is offered daily by appointment. 
Die tests do not involve needles 
or blood and are 99 percent ef- 
fective, according to the Wellness 
Center. They are administered by 
trained student volunteers, but 
can be done by professionals if 
requested. 

KENT STATE U. STUDENTS 
YELL TO RELIEVE STRESS 



KENT, Ohio - Five, four, 
three, two, one - "AHHH!" 

Students' brains might be 
overloaded, but their lungs are in 
good shape. 

At 8:05 p.m. Friday, students 
screamed their end-of-the-semes- 
ter frustrations out in the cam- 
pus' first Kent State University 
SCREAM Day 

About 40 students attended 
the mud- and rain-filled event 
in the lawn near the Centennial 
Court residence halls. 

It turned into Kent State mud 
day, rather than scream day, but 
it was a success," creator Ryan 
jenks said. 

Source: wwm.upfboy.tom 





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The planner 

Campus bulletin board 



12-4 



( RVPTOQl'lP 



JY7I1 JLOVC KLO MZVV Z 

(JNUON B K Z R R I C t> O Q D C 1 

K 1 O B M Z 1 BUEI? DC Q I K 

Vtg Z JYIIV Q H I) (J N I E ! 
Yesterdays Crvplouuip: MY IMJJ FOUND A 
NICKEL SO OLl) AND DIRTY THAT HI: 
t •( H I .DN'T MAKE HEADS OH TAILS OUT OF IT 
!■ *t.i> 'l rnpttxjmp Clue: K ttjuul* Y 



The planner is the Collegian s campus bulletin board service. 
Items in the calendat can be published up to three times. 
Items might not appear because of space constraints but are 
guaranteed to appear on the day of the activity. To place an 
item in the Campus Calendar, stop by Kedzie 116 and fill out a 
form or e mail (he news editor at (ottegiani^pub.kwedu by 
1 1 a.m. two days before it is to run. 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral 
defense of the doctoral dissertation of Mehdi Kabbage at 9 
a . m. today in Throckmorton 403 1 . 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral 
defense of the doctoral dissertation of Kolluru Vijayalatshmi 
at 1 p.rn today in Throckmorton 403 1 . 

■ Matt Brueseke from the Department of Geology and 
Geography at Eastern Illinois University will present 'Mid - 



Miocene Magmatic System Development in the Northwestern 
United States" at A p.m. today in Thompson 211. The event is 
part of the Geology Seminar Series sponsored by the Depart- 
ment of Geology. 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral 
defense of the doctoral dissertation of Jianbin Yu at 2 p.m. 
Tuesday in Throckmorton 2002. 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral de- 
fense of the doctoral dissertation of Janis Crow at 2:30 p.m. 
in Calvin 217. 

■ The ISU San Darfur Team Is collecting new and used 
youth and children's clothing, personal care items like 
toothpaste and soap, and school supplies for Darfur refugees 
in Sudan, Africa. Donations will be accepted in a collection 
box in the Union Courtyard until Dec. 15. 



The blotter | Arrests in Riley County online at www.kstateiokgian.com. 



Corrections and 
clarifications 

Correctiom and clarifications run in this space 
If you see something that should be corrected, 
call news editor leann Sulzen at 17851 532 
6SS6 or e-mail cokgia!mipub.kiu,edu, 

Kansas State Collegian 

(USPS 291 020) The Kansas State Collegian, a 
student newspaper at Ka nsas State University, 
is published by Student Publications Int, 
Kedae 103, Manhattan, K5 66506. The Col 
legian 5 published weekdays during the school 
year and on Wednesdays during the summer. 
Periodical postage is paid at Manhattan, K5 
66502 POSTMASTER Send address changes to 
Kansas State Collegian, circulation desk, Kedae 
10J, Manhattan, K566S06-7167. 
© Kansas State Collegian, 2006 



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Monday, Dec. 4, 2006 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 3 



Pageant experiences technical scoring difficulties 



By Sheila EMI* 

KANSAS SM11C0UKIAN 

Due to technical difficul- 
ties with the scoring system, 12 
contestants and their audience 
waited almost two hours Sat- 
urday evening to find out who 
will be Miss Black and Gold 
2006 

"In all of the years we have 
had this pageant, nothing like 
this has ever happened," said 
Brandon Clark, Alpha adviser 
for the Kappa T;ui chapter of 
Alpha Phi Alpha. 

Except the technical delay, 
the pageant ran smoothly for 
the nearly packed house in Fo- 
rum Hall. 

The pageant was created to 
uplift and encourage African - 
American women, said Abdul 
Yahaya, president of Alpha Phi 
Alpha. 

"We had a great turnout and 
record ticket sales. We were 
excited to see the outcome in 
attendance and in the perfor- 
mance of the girls,'' Yahaya 
said. 

The pageant included enter- 
tainment for the more than 500 
audience members. 

'There were all different 
kinds of people here. 1 feel 
it's good, because it gives us a 
chance to break the stereotypes 
people have against black peo- 
ple," said Makayla Lyons, soph- 
omore in political science and 



former Miss Black and Gold 
contestant. 

The contestants competed in 
five areas: career and personal 
introduction, talent, swimwear, 
evening wear and question -and- 
answer. 

Tiffany Bean, sophomore in 
environmental design, said the 
pageant was entertaining. 

"1 really liked the crowd par- 
ticipation, the praise dance and 
the Alphas' step routine," she 
said. 

Saturday was a special night 
for fraternity members not only 
because of the pageant, but also 
because it was the 100th anni- 
versary of the historically black 
fraternity 

There were many different 
talents displayed, including con 
temporary dance to musk from 
Beyoncg and lanel Jackson, Af- 
rican dance, praise dance, baton 
twirling, recitation of original 
and written poetry and a cap- 
pella singing, with music and 
with the crowd. 

Contestant Deborah Muh- 
weii got the crowd to partici- 
pate with a medley of songs 
dedicated to women, like Aretha 
Franklin's "Respect." 



For some, one of the most 
shocking events of the night was 
co n testant Brittany Foster's re- 
sponse to the question, "Is Amer- 
ica ready for a black president?" 

"Yes, anyone can do a better 
job than Bush," Foster said. 

Some said they thought her 
answer could have been re- 
phrased. 

"I feel that her answer was 
good. However, it could have 
been worded differently to not 
seem so harsh," Lyons said 

Throughout the pageant, fra- 
ternity member and event em- 
cee Paris Rossiter made sure the 
crowd respected the women as 
they performed. 

"These ladies have been 
working diligently for four 
months to get up onstage before 
you. Please show them your ut- 
most respect,'' Rossiter said. 

Many audience members 
were anxious to learn who won, 
but some could not stay to hear 
the announcement because the 
wait kept the audience in Fo- 
rum Hall until 12:45 a.m. 

Some of the contestants' 
family members said they could 
not stay because of long rides 
home. 

The waiting is very frustrat- 




IC0UEGIAK 

UKryttel McKnight, sophomore pre -professional education; Naomi Moka Moliki, tan lor in mats 
communications; Brittany Foster, freshman in apparel marketing and design; and Jasmin* Smith, 
freshman In open option; pose as the rest of the contestants of the Eighth Annual Miss Black and Gold 
Pageant enter the stage in Forum Hall on Saturday night. 



ing, but it is a true test of our 
character to see if we can keep 
our composure," Muhwezi said. 
After the long wait, Muhwezi 
was crowned Miss Black, win- 
ning a $100 book scholarship 



LaKrystal McKnight was 
crowned Miss Gold, winning a 
$200 book scholarship and the 
co-chairmanship of the auxiliary 
community service for Alpha 
Phi Alpha. 



The title of Miss Black and 
Gold 2006 was bestowed upon 
Amber Taylor, who received a 
$300 book scholarship and ad- 
mission into the regional Miss 
Black and Gold pageant. 



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Page 4 



TO THE POINT 



TO THE POINT is an 
editorial selected 
and debated 
by the editorial 
board and written 
after a majority 
opinion is formed. 
This Is the 
Collegian's official 
opinion. 



Heritage, 

colorblindness 

key for kids 

Interracial relationships are 
increasing, and with them, the 
number of bi racial and multira- 
cial children. 

In "Beyond 
color" on Page 
1, Juanita Mc- 
Gowan, direc- 
tor of K-State's 
American Ethnic 
Studies, is quoted 
as saying, "One of the greatest 
challenges I've seen is helping 
the child identify what they're 
going to be called." 

We have a responsibility to 
raise not only our children, 
but also all the children in our 
society to be colorblind, viewing 
people as people, and aware of 
their personal heritage. 

At the same time, racial 
identifications are statistically 
important every day. Prom test- 
ing to census reports, all chil- 
dren need to be prepared to 
mark their racial identities. The 
process of teaching children 
to classify themselves, though 
seemingly a contradiction to 
colorblindness, is both challeng- 
ing and necessary. 

Like teaching a child self- 
defense, the process could rob 
children of their innocence, but 
it is crucial knowledge in the 
construct of our society. 

Most importantly, children 
need to be taught to identify 
themselves by their personal 
cultures and heritages, not a 
statistical blank. 



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Collegian 



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WRITE TO US 

letters an be submitted by e-mail to letttndipub 
kw.tiu, or in person to Kedne 116. Please include 
your full name, year in school and major. Letters 
should be limited to 250 words. All submitted letters 
may be edrted lor length and rlamy 

CONTACT US 

Kansas State Collegian 
Kediie 103 Manhattan, KS M 502 

Display ads (7851532-6560 

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CAMPUS FOURUM 

395-4444 or- 

fourum@spub.ksu.edu 

The Campus Fourum h the Collegian's anonymous 
call-in sysiem. The Fourum is edited to eliminate 
vulgar, racist, obscene and libelous comments The 
comments are not the opinion of the Collegian nor 
are they endorsed by the editorial staff. 

Kane loves Jim, 

■Ml thought Katie loved Kyle. 

Hey Katie, Bernard K going down 

Wt love beer and fmiy navels. AH nght' Cm off rhe 
phone 



Nftdl mm Fourum f Go to wwwJatatKoOt 
fkm.tom for the full version. 



OPINION 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday Dec. 4, 2006 



Walk the talk 

Hot topics require actions by individuals, not endless discussion by media 




KELSCY 

CHILDRESS 



There were many topics covered 
in the Collegian this semester, and 
I can guarantee the list included 
the following; abortion, 
education, gay rights, the 
environment, tobacco, 
AIDS and poverty. These 
topics (and many others) 
will continue to be in 
U.S. newspapers because 
they are "hot topics" But 
because these issues are 
discussed so frequently, 
it begs the question - are — 
they now ignored simply because 
of the questions they bring up? 

Often each article or reporter 
raises the same questions that 
already have been beaten into the 
ground by everyone else, ft cer- 
tainly would be a travesty to realize 
no one cares about these issues 
anymore, because they are over- 
hyped and discussed every single 
day by the media. 

The irony of all this publicity is 
that it somehow dues more harm 
than good. Many people often 
skip articles on abortion or AIDS, 
because they think they already 
know all about it But while people 
seem to know everything about 
rape or tobacco, they do not act 
upon the information they 
have been given. 

However, what is the 
proper action to take? 
If the media stops hawk- 
ing these issues, they might 
be forgotten; if they are discussed 
continuously, it most likely will 
produce a similar outcome. 

Instead of beating the funda- 
mentals of these issues into the 
ground, the media and lobbyists 
who want to produce a campaign 
focused on what gets people's 
attention in today's society should 
work together to broadcast pos- 
sible pathways toward change 

Good examples of these ef- 
forts that have received atten- 
tion and produced results are the 
PRODUCT(red) campaign by U2 
rock group leader Bono that gives 
money to fight Al DS and other 
problems in third-world countries, 
and the TRUTH campaign against 
tobacco. Sometimes going to ex- 
tremes, like leading demonstrations 
in the middle of a crowded street 



or going shopping with Oprah 
Winfrey, is the only way to get the 
focus on the issues that need it 
most. 

So, before turning off 
the television when the news 
reports on the AIDS epidemic 
or the situation in Darfur, lake 
a few minutes to learn about 
the issue and see what you 
can do to make a difference. 
Even driving less 



or donating a piece of old clothing 
can allay many of the problems 
our country (and our world) faces 
today. 

Many people fail to realize that 
blocking out information or ignor- 
ing problems will not make them 
go away. Gay people will still want 
to get married, people will continue 
to pay $5 for a pack of cigarettes, 
women will still want the right 



to have an abortion, and global 
wanning will continue to make the 
temperature 70 degrees one day 
and 20 the next 



Ktfeey ChUdmt h a tank* In fret styHna . She 
is spending, next semester In seduslon to avoid 

I^Kt htd)nlk*J tlw <9AWRt)ff't» wflW, f&y l#M 

i lot better in person than in your Cofteolin 
pkturtr* Pleas* letepathlcalry send your torn 
mtnb to apMWofF^sptrAJrsa.eao'. 




IRuttrattom by Ehrit Achatpofcl | COLLEGIAN 



Dead week makes scholars out of semester slackers 



Formula for a semester: classes 
begin with high ambition and a 
decent work ethic. Weeks pass, 
the novelty wears off, 
and laziness begins 
to take control The 
months go by with 
sporadic bursts of mo- 
tivation that break up 
the general lukewarm 
sentiments about work 
Finally, the end nears. 
and suddenly everyone 
is a scholar. 

Dead week is officially here. 

Technically speaking, "dead 
week" is the nightmarish week 
before final exams. During this 
span of time, students study like 
it's going out of style 




BECKY 

STEINHERT 



- a joke, of course, because ev- 
eryone knows studying is always 
fashionable, much like blue jeans 
or leather jackets. This week 
is an opportunity to make 
up for a semester's worth of 
ignoring reading assignments 
and sleeping through lectures 

Students suddenly 
develop an affinity for Hale 
Library, a marked interest in 
extra credit projects, and a 
desire for a strong academic 
bond with their professors. 
All-nighters likely will ensue for 
the especially desperate and the 
especially studious. 

Students hope hard work 
during dead week will bring a 
spontaneous recovery 



to their grades. After carefully 
reviewing grades so far for the 
semester, students either will find 
themselves naively computing, 
"OK, to get a B overall, all I have 
to do is get 100 percent on the 
final," or asking themselves, "Is it 
too late to drop?" Some unnec- 
essarily dramatic people might 
experience at least one minor 
emotional breakdown as a result 
of the stress. 

Later, exams. Some will be 
rewarded for their reading; others 
punished for their procrastina- 
tion 

But soon the dreaded time 

will be over. Finals will be taken. 

Everyone will make a solemn. 

whole-hearted vow to start 



off right next semester. And for 
a nearly month-long break, the 
only studying to be done will be 
the back of cereal box as you eat 
breakfast when you finally roll 
out of bed at 1 p.m. 

There's time for work and time 
for play, and the last-ditch oppor- 
tunity for better grades that dead 
week supplies is a time for work 
for most of us. 

But the intense studying will 
come to an end, break will come, 
a new semester will start, and the 
whole dance will begin again. 



ledry Steintrt Is a freshman la psychology. 
•least stnd comments to opMon<*ipvb. 

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Monday, Dec. 4, 2006 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 5 



From the Public Editor: 

Journalists' 7 sins of muddy reporting 



Throughout my fledgling 
career there have been warn- 
ings of things I must never do 
if I want to succeed 
in this industry. These 
lessons ore familiar to 
young journalists and 
form the basic rules 
that keep this industry 
going. 

Each rule has its 
subtleties, but they can 
be sorted into what 1 
consider the "Seven 
Deadly Sins" of jour- 
nalism. 



FABRICATION 

This arguably is the ugliest, 
nastiest and dirtiest of them 
all. This sin refers to when a 
journalist knowingly makes 
something up and publishes 
it as true. It is bound to get a 
journalist fired. 

There was an allegation of 
this very sin last month when 
a reporter wildly misquoted a 
source. The reporter was new 
and didn't know all the rules 
as well as he should have, but 
I doubt he'll make the same 
mistake again. 

INACCURACY 

This category is a grab bag 
and includes factual wrurs, 
misquotation, incorrect con- 
text and anything else that can 
cause a paper to print some- 
thing untrue. 

This happens by accident 
and is expected due to the 
inherent fallibility of people. 
However, if it is the result of 




laziness or negligence, head- 
line-writers* heads could roll. 



PLAGIARISM 

It's a lot harder to 
avoid this in journal- 
ism than you might 
think. It takes years to 
gain an understand- 
ing of proper attribu- 
tion in this field, but 
blatant cutting and 
pasting is a no-brainer 



LOGAN C. 
ADAMS 



SENSATIONALISM 

Every time I hear this word, 
I remember when I overheard 
my junior high principal make 
a private joke about future 
changes to the building 1 
thought he was serious and 
repeated it as if it were fact. 

Journalism is a business, 
and news companies often are 
tempted to overplay certain 
stories because I hey want 
more attention (and profit) or 
because they don't understand 
reality. The public welfare is 
not served by grandstanding 
and false danger; it just makes 
people ignore real problems. 

PREDILECTION 

Also known as "bias" 
Open-mindedness is a ne 
cessity in this business Refus 
ing to see things from different 
perspectives or reaching a 
conclusion before considering 
the evidence can prevent the 
truth from being found. 

Having an opinion is one 
thing; never looking beyond 
it is another Reporters miss 



things when they make up 
their minds too early 

ARROGANCE 

I'm certainly not innocent 
on this count. Journalism 
requires a strong dose of confi- 
dence; how else does a person 
question the powerful? The 
problem is that this job has a 
way of sneaking past a humble 
person's safeguards and going 
straight to the head. 

The best treatment is 
well-aimed bits of criticism 
delivered to the ego regularly. 
Chronic cases might require 
well-aimed blunt-force trauma 
delivered to the head. 

PROSTITUTION 

When they take money or 
favors to promote a point of 
view or when they forsake 
their own opinions for those 
pushed upon them, journalists 
stop being independent minds 
and become property. 

Most professional journal- 
ists today, including those at 
the Collegian, work with prin- 
ciples that forbid them from 
accepting anything that would 
compromise their integrity and 
independence. 

However, I've never seen 
reporters refuse a free lunch 
buffet at a press conference. 



K-State chapter celebrates 
centennial of national fraternity 



io^ani. Adams ts the Cofttqian't puMk 
editor and | tmiof in print founutfent. 
Send (ommetitsto pubkadfawnpHbJaii. 
tdu w «tdi him in person 10».m. to noon 
Friday at die I State Student Union. 



By Mike. Kelly 
KMIMSIMECQLIEGIM 

The men of Alpha Phi Al- 
pha celebrate their national 
centennial today and recog- 
nize a century of brother- 
hood and service. 

The fraternity, which was 
started on Dec. 4. 1906, at 
Cornell University in Ithaca, 
N.Y., originally was founded 
as a study and support group 
for minority students who 
experienced racial preju- 
dice, both academically and 
socially. 

"The half-dozen African- 
American students at Cornell 
University during the school 
year of 1904 and (19)05 did 
not return to campus the 
following year," said Darryl 
R. Matthews Sr, General 
President of Alpha Phi Al- 
pha, on the fraternity's Web 
site. "The incoming students 
in 1905, in founding Alpha 
Phi Alpha, were determined 
to bind themselves together 
to ensure that each would 
survive in the racially hostile 
environment." 

At K-State, Alpha Phi Al- 
pha was installed as a chap- 
ter on April 15, 1976, and is 
the oldest African -American 
fraternity on campus. 

Alpha Phi Alpha is the 
first intercollegiate frater- 
nity established by African- 
Americans. Some of its fa- 
mous alumni include W.E.B 
DuBois, Jesse Owens, Duke 
Ellington, Edward Brooke, 



Thurgood Marshall, Andrew 
Young and Martin Luther 
King, Jr 

Alpha Phi Alpha has ini- 
tiated more than 175,000 
men and has been open to 
men of all races since 1945. 
There are more than 700 Al- 
pha Phi Alpha chapters in 
the Americas, Europe, Asia 
and the West Indies. 

"Being a part of some- 
thing with as great a legacy 
as Alpha Phi Alpha is truly 
an honor," said Pat Agwu, 
K-State graduate student in 
curriculum and instruction 
and member of Alpha Phi 
Alpha. 

The official Alpha Phi 
Alpha centennial celebra- 
tion took place in July with 
a convention in Washing- 
ton, DC, called "Reflects 
on Rich Past, Looks Toward 
Bright Future." 

Beginning with a speech 
on Capitol Hill, US Con- 
gressman and Alpha mem- 
ber David Scott presented 
the House of Representa- 
tives with new legislation 
that recognized and hon- 
ored Alpha Phi Alpha for 
its accomplishments and its 
historic milestone. 

"Mr Speaker, it is an 
honor and special privilege 
to address this great body 
on such an auspicious occa- 
sion," said Scott, D-GA. 

"As a proud member of 
this fraternity. 1 feel special 
esteem in joining the entire 
House to recognize the his- 



torical significance of the 
centennial anniversary of 
Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, 
Inc." 

The legislation, titled 
House Concurrent Resolu- 
tion 384, passed with unani- 
mous consent. 

The bill was co- spon- 
sored by the eight Congress- 
men who are alumni of the 
fraternity. 

At K-State, the fraternity 
members organized a vari- 
ety of events to celebrate the 
centennial. 

On Saturday night, the 
fraternity had its annual 
Miss Black and Gold pag- 
eant, a pageant featuring 12 
nominated contestants from 
K State. 

"Miss Black and Gold is 
always a great event for Al- 
pha Phi Alpha," Agwu said. 
"The contestants were all 
very talented women, and 
we were happy they chose 
to be part of the event." 

The members also had a 
reception for alumni in hon- 
or of the milestone. 

The members of Alpha 
Phi Alpha said the centen- 
nial event not only was ex 
■citing, but also it helped 
remind them of their pledge 
to an amazing organization 
and legacy of brotherhood. 

"We are very excited 
about our milestone," Agwu 
said. 

"Events like this seem to 
re-energize our efforts in Al- 
pha Phi Alpha." 



AHEAD 




January 2007 

December 27, 2006 - January 10, 2007 

Time is running out. Enroll today! To enroll and/or obtain an Intercession schedule with complete course descriptions and 
prerequisites, visit http //www dee Ksu.edu/ If you prefer, call (785) 532-5566 or 1-800-432-8222 or visit the Division of Continuing 
Education at 131 College Court Building, 1615 Anderson Ave., Manhattan, KS 

Tuition for on-campus coursework will be $164 per undergraduate resident credit hour and $227 per graduate resident credit hour, 
plus $1 pe r day special and health fees A student services fee and/or materials fees may be required for some courses A $1 " 
credit hour fee is assessed for Engineering and Architecture courses R. 



Course Title 



Course # 



Rett Credit 



Dates 



Times 



r^i * n s u sun 

Collegian 

1 18 Kedzie 

785-532-6560 



Agriculture 


i 












Practicum in Bakery Technology 


GRSC 701 


94100 


1 UG/G 


1/4-1/10 


MTWUF 8:00 AM-4 30 PjM 


Architecture, Planning, ft Design 








'i • J 


^^p^. jfl 


Topics in Architectural Design Methods 










***> -j^^^t 


The Expressive Line 


ARCH 710 


94107 


3UG/G 


12727-1/10 


MTWUF 12 30PM-4:15PM 


LEED for Professional Accreditation 


ARCH 715 


94t08 


3 UG/G 


12/27-1/10 


MTWUF 12,00 PM-5PM 


Beginning Airbrush 


IAPD406 


94136 


3UG 


12/27-1/10 


MTWUF 1-00 PIM 45 PM » 


Portfolio Design Studio 


IAPD406 


94137 


3UG 


12/27-1/10 


MTWUF 9 00 AM- 12 45 PMJ 


Portfolio Design Studio 


IAPD830 


94139 


3G 


12/27-1/10 


MTWUF 9:00 AM- 12 45 PM| 


Design Graphics and Visual Thlnlclng 


LAR310 


94109 


3UG 


12/27-1/10 


MTWUF 100PM5 00PM | 


Problems; Advanced Design Graphics/visual Thinking 


LAR741 


94110 


3 UG/G 


12727-1/10 


MTWUF 100PM-500PM 1 


Computer Applications in Planning and Design 


PLAN 630 


94150 


1.2 UG/G 


1/3-1/10 


MTWUF 9 00 AM-1 45 PM 9 


Arta ft Sciences 




{niufth. 


*~ 




i 


Understanding Islam 


AMETH580 


94105 


3 UG/G 


12/27-1/10 


MTWUF9 0GAM-1245 


Forensic Medicine and the Investigation of Death 


ANTH684 


94103 


3 UG/G 


12/27-1/9 


MTWUFSa 900 AM-5 00 PM 


The History of the American Intelligence Community 


HIST 200 


94117 


3UG 


12/27-1/10 


MTWUF frOOPM- 10: 15 PM 


Sport and Exercise Personality 


KIN 592 


94123 


3 UG/G 


12/27-1/10 


MTWUF 8 30 AM 12:30 PM 


Jazz in Kansas City and the Southwest 


MUSIC 424 


94124 


3UG 


12/27-1/10 


MTWUF 1:00 PHM45PM 


From Metropolis to the Heartland Immigrant 












Experiences in America 


SOCIO 500 


94125 


3 UG/G 


12727-1/10 


MTWUF 900 AM-1 00 PM 


Social Construction of Serial Murder 


SOCIO 562 


94126 


3 UG/G 




MTWUF 1 00 PM-&:00 PM 

Sa 9 00 AM-500 PM 


Ethics in Drama Therapy 


THTRE 630 


94128 


3UG/G 


12(27-1/10 


MTWUF 9:00 AM-5 00 PM 


Topics in Technical Theatre Scene Painting 


THTFE711 


94130 


3 UG/G 


12/27-1/10 


MTWUF 9 00 AM-1 DO PM 


Women and Enviranmertaiism The EcotemintsI 












Perspective 


WOMST500 


94134 


3 UG/G 


12/27-1/10 


MTWUF 9:00 AM-100PM 


Business 'ffn. 


. , 








i 

MF 5:00 PM- 10:00 PM ','//) 
Sa1O0PM-5 0OPM 


Introduction to Total Quality Management 


MANGT 300 


94157 


1UG 


16-1/8 


Achieving Career Success Ik^^I 


MANGT 497 


94140 


3UG 


12/27-1/tO 


MTWUF 815AM1200PM 


Education 

Stress Management 


EDCEP502 


94163 


3 UG/G 


12/27-1/10 


MTWUF 3:30 PM-6 30 PM 


Stress Management for Teachers, Counselors, 










i i I f ) * 


and Administrators 


EDCEP 602 


94162 


3G 


12/27-1/10 


MTWUF 3:30 PM-6 30 PM 


Early Field 
Eng (neurit 


F^ v * ■ jq lianrA 


FOSFC 230 


94160 


1 UG 


12/27-l'TO 


I'm* 


t xppnencc 


t-UOCltf £*>U 


10 




CAD in Engineering and Construction 


ARE 311 


94165 


2UG 


12/27- V10 


MTWUF 8 00 AM-1 2 :00 PM 


Introduction to LEED 


ARE 720 


94111 


1 UG/G 


1/3-1/10 


MTWUF VQOPM4 0GPM 


Introduction to Information Technotogy 


CIS 101 


94146 


1UG 


12/27-12/29 


WUF 8:00 AM 12 10 PM 


Introduction to Microcomputer Spreadsheet 












Applications 


CIS 102 


94147 


1 UG 


1/2-1/4 


TWU 8 00 AM- 12 10 PM 


Introduction to Microcomputer Database Applicator* 


CIS 103 


94146 


1 UG 


1/8-1/10 


MTW 8 00 AM- 12 10 PM 


Topics m Construction Management TIK-up Concrete 












Stum 


ret (rt Construction Mangt 


CNS644 


WHS 


2UG/G 


1/2-1/10 


MTWUF 8:00 AM 12:00 PM 


Introduction 


n to Total Quality Management 


DEN 300 


94164 


1 UG 


1/5-1/8 


MF 5 00 PM-10 00 PM 
Sal.00PM-5.O0PM 


Probiems/Eng and Tech; Hazwopar Training 


DENJ88 


94166 


3UG 


1/2-1/30 


TWUFfl:OOAM-7O0PM 


Human Ecology 












Under standing Death, Dying, Grief and Lota 


n» 


94167 


3UG 


12/27-1/10 


MTWUF 8 30 AM- 12: 30 PM 


i >.'.!' in io Marnage and Famfty Therapy 




94171 


3 UG/G 


12/27-1/10 


MTWUF 8 30 AM- 12 IS PM 


Topics: Prsmarrtal Education and Couneatir 


^W^» wUB 


94172 


3UGA3 


12/27-1/10 


MTWUF « 00 PM 10O0PM 


Seminar in 


Long-Term Care Administration 


GERON 810 


94160 


3UGA3 


12/28-1/10 


MTWUF 5 00 PM-900 PM 



www.dce.ksu.edu/intersession 




Page 6 



SPORTS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, Dec. 4, 2006 




AUSTIN 
MEEK 



South 

continues 

Big 12 reign 



KANSAS CITY, Mo - On pa- 
per, this looked like the most evenly- 
matched Big 12 Conference cham- 
pionship game in 
half a decade 
On the field, it 
looked like just 
another South - 
Division smack - 
down. 

Oklahoma heal 
Nebraska 2 1-7 but 
the game didn't 
" seem that close 

"We didn't get it done We didn't 
play good enough We didn't coach 
good enough," Nebraska coach Bill 
Callahan said. 

Statistically, this game was much 
more competitive than the last two 
Big 12 championships Of course, 
that's not saying much. 

lb appreciate just how ugly the 
last two Big 12 championship games 
were, consider this: when Nebraska 
scored a touchdown in the second 
quarter, it was the first tide-game 
TD for the North since 2003. 

It's safe to say this wasn't what 
the Big 12 bigwigs had in mind when 
the super-conference was bom. 

This conference was supposed 
to produce compelling late-season 
matchups, TV darlings with title- 
game implications. But in the con- 
ference's 1 1-year history, only three 
championship games have featured 
two Top- 10 teams. 

Suffice it to say, Big 12 title games 
have a history of bad matchups and 
lopsided outcomes. 

This game was no different, de 
spite the rich tradition between the 
two programs 

Oklahoma led for 59 minutes 
and 12 seconds, a title-game record 
Nebraska's first two plays were an 
ill-conceived reverse on the opening 
kickoff and fumble on the first play 
from scrimmage. 

From that disastrous opening 
sequence to the game's final play, 
it was clear the best athletes and 
coaches were wearing Sooner red. 

Oklahoma exploited Nebraska's 
secondary. Wide receiver Malcolm 
Kelly shredded the Cornhuskers for 
a title-game record 142 yards and 
two touchdowns. 

Meanwhile, Nebraska's pass 
ing game smacked of desperation 
Quarterback Zac Taylor threw the 
ball 50 times, completing just 23 
with three interceptions. 

Now, after the latest Big 12 beat- 
down, the question remains, is the 
Big 12 North closing the gap? 

Look at it this way. The best 
North team in three years held Okla- 
homa (o 42 rushing yards, pinned 
the Sooners inside their own 20 six 
times and still never had a chance. 

Progress or frustration? 

Either way, the South is king 
once again. 

"We didn't match up real well;' 
Callahan said. "They took advan- 
tage of everything They just played 
better. 

"I have no excuses up here to- 
night" 



Austin M»*k tsa senior in puMk wUtiom, 
flwt send comments to tporft ■■ ipub.km.tiu. 



Commerce Bank Wildcat Classic 



Champions ...again 




Catrina Rawum | C0LIEGIAN 

The K-Stat* woman's basketball turn celebrates its win over Alcorn State 81-41 Saturday in the title game of the Commerce 
Bank Wildcat Classic. It was the first time the Wildcats won the tournament since 2003. 



Wildcats defeat 

Alcorn State to take 

tournament title 



By Jeffrey Rake 
KANSAS ST*TC COLUdAN 

The K-State women's basketball 
team used a solid defensive 
performance, along with a big 
game from sophomore forward Marl- 
ies Gipson, to defeat Akom Stale 81- 
41 to win the Commerce Bank Wildcat 
Classic championship Saturday night 
at Bramlage Coliseum. 

It was the first time since 2003 the 
Wildcats (6-1) were able to win the 
tournament. 

Gipson had a team -high 16 points - 
converting 6-of-8 shots from the floor 

- and earned tournament Most Valu- 
able Player honors. Gipson finished 
the tournament with 29 points and 12 
rebounds 

"She's just been tremendous, very 
consistent," K-State coach Deb Patter- 
son said. "The thing that's impressive 
is (hat she is competing over the long 
haul of the game. The contribution just 
about every louch is very positive for 
the basketball team" 

Junior forward Shan a Wheeler c ame 
off the bench to score 15 points, and 
two other Wildcats - junior Kimberly 
Dietz and sophomore Shalce Lchning 

- finished in double figures, scoring 
13 points and 10 points, respectively. 
Mining also had a team-high 1 1 as- 
sists, marking her first double-double 
of the season 

"When we can gel thai kind of bal- 
ance, it gives us a chance to be a bel- 
ter basketball team," Patterson said. "I 
think that's what these early season 
games provide us - an opportunity lo 
get some balance and to get players a 
little more comfortable in the frame 
work of the offense" 

The Wildcats took a 26-23 lead inlo 
the half, after a late six-point run gave 
Alcom State (2-2) some momentum 




in the closing minutes. But the game 
didn't remain close for long, as the 
Wildcats used a 15-3 run early in the 
second half to build a decisive 41-26 
lead. 

"I think this team, in the second 
half, established that they were going 
to be more intelligent on the offensive 
end of the floor," Patterson said "We 
began to play a little higher percentage 
basketball in the second half." 

The Wildcats have won three 
straight games, holding opponents to 
an average of just 31 points per game 
during the stretch 

WILDCATS STOMP DEVILETTES 

K State defeated Mississippi Valley 
State 77-18 in the first round of the 
Wildcat Classic on Friday night. 

The point total for the Devilettes 
was the fewest points an opponent has 
ever scored against K-State, 

Trie previous lowest score total was 
23 points, by Central Connecticut State 
on Jan. 2, 2004 

The Wildcats held Mississippi Val 



Sophomore 
forward 
MariiM 
Gipson 

finished 
with IS 
points in 
K-State'sSl- 
41 win over 
Alcorn State. 
Gipson was 
named Most 
Valuable 
Player of the 
tournament. 
She is the 
first player 
to garner 
MVP status 
since Kendra 
Wecker won 
the award in 
2003. 

Christopher 

H»n*winckel 
COLLEGIAN 



ley State to just five field goals and 
8,6-percent shooting, both records for 
futility against K-State. 

The Devilettes made 5-of-58 shots 
and missed all 24 three-point at- 
tempts. 

"Mississippi Valley State obviously 
had a lot of trouble making shots to- 
night, but 1 do (eel like we overall did 
a nice job of contesting it, being in a 
good, solid, sound defensive position," 
Patterson said. 

Freshman Ashley Sweat scored a 
career-high 15 points and led all scor- 
ers. 

The team pulled down a season - 
high 61 rebounds and recorded a sea- 
son-high 21 assists. 

Gipson and Wheeler each blocked 
(our shots and have recorded at least 
one block in every game this season. 

"Defense is obviously a big part of 
our game," Wheeler said. "I take a lot 
of pride in defense, but I love playing 
defense." 

— Scott Kurd 



K-State loses 84-82 heartbreaker to Colorado State 



By Nick Dunn 
KANSAS SMIE COLLEGIAN 

It was as easy as one, two, 
three 

All Cartier Martin had to do 
was sink three free throws, and the 
Wildcats would land an unthink- 
able comeback victory at Colorado 
State Saturday 

With K-State trailing 84-82 and 
one second left, the senior forward 
was fouled while attempting the 
game- winning 3 -pointer. 

He went to the line with a chance 
to win - or at least tie - the game 
and shock the 3,894 Ram fans at 
Moby Arena in Fort Collins, Colo. 

Simple enough for last year's Big 



12 Conference leader in free throw 
percentage, right? 

Not quite. Martin clanked the 
first, clanked the second and. trying 
to miss, banked the third freebie in. 
A tenth of a second remained, and 
the Rams got the ball in-bounds to 
secure the 84-83 victory. 

It wouldn't have been such a 
tough defeat for the Wildcats (4- 
3) if they hadn't fought so hard to 
make it that close Colorado State 
(5-2) - fueled by a career-high 30 
points from guard Cory Lewis - led 
by as many as IS points in the sec- 
ond half and was ahead 71-60 with 
6:36 left 

However, K-Stale scored 12 
points in the final minute to pull 



back into the game Martin led the 
way with 2 1 second-half points after 
going scoreless in the first half, and 
junior guard Blake Young chipped 
in with 15 points - all but two com- 
ing in the second half, 

In all, the Wildcats scored 56 
points during the second half, more 
than doubling their first-half output 
of 27 points. 

The Rams were led by Lewis, who 
sunk 7 of-8 from three- point range 
after entering the contest with only 
four 3 -pointers in the first six games. 
The starters accounted for 79 of the 
Rams' 84 points, with guard Tyler 
Smith scoring 19 and forward Jason 
Smith totaling 15 points. 

Lewis hit 7-of-8 free throws down 



the stretch to keep the Wildcats at a 
distance, but things got interesting 
in the final seconds. 

Young hit a 3 -pointer with one 
second left to put the score at 84 
82. All the Rams had to do was get 
the ball in-buunds. but the pass 
sailed over the head of (ason Smith 
and uut of bounds 

That gave K Stale the ball under 
its own basket with one second left, 
which led to Martin's free throws. 

K-State fell to 1-3 on the road 
and is 0-5 all time at Fort Collins. 
In their previous two road games, 
the Wildcats fell by 24 at New Mex- 
ico and by 30 at California. 

K State returns home Tuesday to 
face Cleveland State at 7 p.m. 



1 MINUTE 
DRILL 

Staff Reports 





ALUMNI 

ASSOCIATION 



FBC | Alumni association to begin 
selling travel packages today 

The I State Alumni Association opened its 
toll-free bow) hotkne at noon Sunday, selling 
official university trawl packages to It-State's 
bowl game. Fans can call for more information 
The number 6 (866) 373-7379 and wi be 
open 8am. to 5 pm Monday through Friday, 
beginning today. 

"We are excited once again to be able to 
offer the official university travel packages; 
said Amy Button Renz, president of the Alumni 
Association said. "K-State is known for the 
tremendous support of 
our fans. We congratu- 
late toadt Prince, 
his staff and the team 
for their outstanding 
season, and we look 
forward to the bowl 
game- 
Travel packages 
include hotel accom- 
modations. Wildcat 
reception, souvenir, 
pregame ticket and all transportation. 
Depending on the bowl, packages also might 
include game tickets, or tickets might need 
to be purchased directly through the K-State 
Athletic Ticket Office due to multiple ticket 
prices. Travel packages can be purchased with 
or without charter at service from Manhattan, 
Wichita or Kansas City, Mo, to the bowl destina 
Hon thy 

For pregame reservations onfy, call toll-free 
(8001 600-ALUM (2586) or (78S) 532-6760 in 
the Manhattan area. 

Updated information will be posted on 
the Alumni Association's Web site as ft becomes 
available at www K-Sfofe.com. 



Associated Press 



BOWL 



TOIPIONSI^ 



SERIES 



FBC | Florida to meet Ohio State 
in national championship game 

Florida beat Michigan on Sunday in the 
only game that mattered, 

The Gators, who lobbied hard for this 
victory, were picked to play No. 1 Ohio State 
for coilege football's national championship, 
ending any chance for the Wolverines to get 
the rematch they so desired and thought 
they deserved. 

Southern California was a step away 
from the title game if it had beaten UCLA on 
Saturday Instead, the second-ranked Trojans 
were upset 13-9, dropping in the standings 
and cleanng the way for Florida 117-1) or 
Michigan (11-1). 

The Gators leapfrogged idle Michigan 
by winning the Southeastern Conference 
championship game 38-78 over Arkansas. 

Michigan's consolation prize is a Rose 
Bowl bid to play USC (10-7), a dassic Big 10 
vs. Pac-10 match up of teams left to wonder 
what could have been. 

The championship game is Jan. 8 in 
Glendale, Ariz. 



In other BCS 



■ Big 1 2 champion Oklahoma will meet 
unbeaten Boise State in the Fiesta Bowl on 
Jan.1. 

■ Big fast champion Louisville will play A{{ 
champion Wake Forest in the Orange Bowl 
on Jan. 2, 

■ LSU will take f lorida's spot in the Sugar 
Bowl and play Notre Dame on Jan. 3, 

Big 11 Conference teams in the bowls 

■ Oklahoma Stale (6-6) vs. Alabama (6-6) in 
the PetroSun Independence Bowl. 

■ Tews A8.M (9-3) vs. California (9-3) in the 
Pacific Life Holiday Bowl 

■ Missouri (8-4) vs. Oregon State (9-4} in the 
Brut Sun Bowl. 

■ T««T«h (7-5) vs. Minnesota (6-6) in the 
Insight Bowl. 

■Texas (9-3) vs. fowa (6^6) in the Alamo Bowl 

■ Nebraska (9-4! vs. Auburn (10-7) in the 
AT&T Cotton Bowl. 



Monday, Dec. 4, 2006 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 7 




Steven Doll | COLLEGIAN 

Poker contestants place bets while competing in a hand of Texas Hold'em during the After Hours Poker 
Tournament Friday night in the Union Ballroom. 

More than 200 play poker 
in After Hours tournament 



By Emily Haug 

KANSAS 5UTF. COLLEGIAN 

One K Stair sludent spent 
his 21st birthday playing pok 
er Friday night 

"I was really excited for a 
chance to win some prizes," 
Caleb Frasier, junior in sec- 
ondary education, said. "Un- 
fortunately, I lost after the 
first hand." 

The After Hours Poker 
Tournament, sponsored by 
Union Program Council, was 
Friday night 

The tournament took 
place from 7 p.m. to midnight 
in the K-State Student Union 
Ballroom 

More than 200 students 
registered for the Texas Hold- 
'em tournament 

"It has really been a suc- 
cess," said Amanda Stanford, 
junior in psychology and Af- 
ter Hours co-chair. "Every 



one who showed up tonight 
or was on a waiting list was 
able to play" 

Pat Agwu, adviser for Af- 
ter Hours, said the tourna 
ment has been put on for the 
past 3 1/2 years. The tourna- 
ment was sponsored by UPC 
but was run by Midwest En- 
tertainment. 

The Union Ballroom was 
set up with 20 tables, and 10 
contestants were assigned to 
each table. 

The chips and decks of 
cards were provided for the 
contestants. Each table del- 
egated one person as the 
dealer. 

Many contestants took 
part in the tournament for a 
chance to show off their pok- 
er-playing talents and for the 
possibility of winning prizes. 

Midway through the tour- 
nament, nachos were provid- 
ed to the players. 



The tournament was 
played continuously until 
there was a final table of 10 
players 

Prizes were awarded to the 
top three winners The cham- 
pion won an XBox 360. 

The second-place winner 
received a digital camera, and 
the third-place player won a 
$75 Best Buy gift certificate. 

Kevin Quinn, senior in ar- 
chitectural engineering, said 
he enjoyed the poker tourna- 
ment. 

"It was really a fun time," 
he said. "1 have never done 
anything like this before. 
I was depressed that I got 
out before the nachos were 
served, though." 

If students missed out on 
the tournament, they will 
have a second chance to par 
ticipate when UPC sponsors 
another tournament in the 
spring. 



Deer season starts amid sleet 



By Joih Route 

KANSAS S1ATE COLLEGIAN 

The rifle season for deer got 
off to a cold start Wednesday. 
However, icy sleet did not de- 
ter hunters from going out and 
trying to bag a deer on the first 
day. 

"I think that for the first 



day, with the cold and every- 
thing, the deer will be moving a 
lot," said Ashley Hards, sopho- 
more in park management and 
conservation. "I ihink that the 
number of kills that would hap- 
pen ... will be increased a lot." 
Nathan Dermody, sopho 
more in construction science 
and management, said he has 



been anticipating the season 
for about two months 

"I am always excited for 
deer season," he said. "I really 
start getting excited in Septem- 
ber, since bow season is only a 
couple weeks away. 1 am always 
getting ready, from shooting my 
bow in the spring to scouting in 
late summer" 



Roval Parole yearbook 



{we've got the stories you've got to read. 



Mr i «ny 
in Ki-rii *** |OJ 
W c.ill 512-6555 



w Purple Pig 



so 



$ 1 

Cheeseburgers 
$ 1 



Carolina vs Philly 
7:30 Kickoff 

Fries 

Tots Sports Trivia 
Contest at 



*1 25 

Hamburgers 



SO 

pints Halftime 



$4 

Pitchers 

opens at lpni 



Union Program 
Council 



\ 



77P? 



Festival of Nations: Festival of Holidays *V^ 

Union Courtyard, ground floor • rem 1 pm, free trad! -Qm 



\| 



Monday, December 4 



Tuesday, December 5 



Tho Buzz Scratch Track 

Union Courtyard, ground floor • mm - 1 pn 



Wednesday, December 6 



Finals Destresser 

Union Courtyard, ground floor • 8 - 10 pm 
Film Little Miss Sunshine - Forum Hall, ground floor • lOrm, Free 



Friday, December 8 



Film A Christmas Story- Little Theatre, first floor « 8 pm, $1 
Also showing: Saturday, December 9 • 7 & 9:30 pm. SI 
Sunday, December 10*8 pm, $1 



William T. Kemper Art Gallery 



Pete Souza Photography on display through Dec. 21 



ii K-Stdt^ Sludent Union • UPC phone - 53S-er.7l - wwv i ■ ni'C hoiiinc :•■■ 




Tour retells Christmas story 



By Lacay D. Mackay 

KANSAS STATKOUEaAN 

A group of eager faces 
leaned forward to gaze at the 
sleeping form of a child. 

A young couple sat behind 
the wooden cradle, smiling de 
spite the cold They softly be- 
gan singing "Silent Night." The 
group of people begin whisper 
ing the words, singing in the 
middle of a stable. 

This scene was one of the 
climatic moments at the out- 
door, interactive nativity pro- 
gram, Bethlehem Revisited. 

The 45- minute tour took 
visitors across the farm of 
Nancy and ludd Swiharts in 
Keats. Kan , to tell the story of 
the birth of Jesus Christ. 

Visitors packed a welcome 
center at Keats Park al the 
tour's start, sipping hot bever 
ages before facing the cold 

Tour guides led groups 
through the story of Christ- 
mas, starting with the words 
of prophets centuries before 
Christ's coming. Groups heard 
the prophetic words of Mo- 



ses, David, Isaiah, Micah and 
Zechariah 

Groups listened to the 
story of Jesus' birth according 
to the Bible, from Mary's visit 
from an angel to his birth in a 
stable Groups walked through 
a crowded marketplace and 
watched as shepherds heard 
about |esus' birth from an an- 
gelic choir. 

Jessica Shoffner, junior 
in horticultural therapy, and 
Amanda Lindahl, junior in 
bakery sciences, attended 
Bethlehem Revisited Saturday 
night. It was their first time. 

Shoffner said she heard the 
experience reminded one of 
the reason for the holiday. 

"I think a lot of Christmas is 
taken away from Christ's birth 
day" she said 

Lindahl agreed. 

"It's a really fun and good 
reminder of what Christmas is 
all about." she said. 

The outdoor tour brought 
the experience to life. 

"It's fun and awesome to 
read about the story," Lindahl 
said, "but it's neat to see (he 



story played out." 

The Swiharts have had the 
event at their farm since the 
1980s. Nancy said the event 
started small, with family and 
friends In about 1993, Nancy 
said the family had a large 
group come through, and the 
event began to grow. 

Local churches and Chris- 
tian groups have become in- 
volved with the program, in- 
cluding Grace Baptist Church, 
Manhattan Christian College 
and K- State students 

Over three days' time, Nan- 
cy said the program has space 
for 2,000. People go in groups 
of 20 about every 10 minutes 

This year, narrators have 
taken more responsibility from 
guides, keeping narration stan 
dard, Nancy said 

lb the group providing the 
program, Bethlehem Revisited 
is more than a story retold. It's 
a real-life experience. 

"It's real," Nancy said "It's 
in the out of doors where you 
smell all of the smells and touch 
things, and that all blends into 
that experience" 




Christopher Hanewlnckel ', COLLEGIAN 
Patrom on the Bethlehem Revisited tour look In on Mary and Joseph as they hold baby Jesus in the 
stable. Almost 2,000 people toured the story of Christmas over the weekend. 



Sell Your Textbooks 

For CASH! 





at 

Varney's Book Store - In Aggieville 
Textbook Department 

Buy Back Hours: 

Mon, Dec 1 1 th - Fri, Dec 1 5th 
9:00 am - 8:00 pm 




\ ii «*a **\ 



*Please Bring a Current Photo ID 
To Sell Your Books!* 




Pages 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Friday, Dec. 4, 2006 



Art auction closes AIDS week 



By Erk Davis 

KANSAS SMiKOUE&IAN 

World AIDS Week ended 
Saturday night with an art auc- 
tion in the K-State Student 
Union Ballroom. 

The art show, which featured 
art donated by local artists, 
raised money for the Regional 
AfDS Protect 

Photographs, pastel draw- 
ings, watercolor and several 
other media were represented 
in the show 

lori Wadcll, sophomore in 



biology, attended the auction 

"I think that this is a good 
way to raise money for AIDS 
awareness," she said. 

The silent auction lasted for 
an hour. Minimum bids ranged 
from $20 for some of the small- 
er works to $85 for a sculpture 
shaped like a coffee mug 

Anthony Garcia, junior in 
mass communications, helped 
a fellow Delta Lambda Phi 
fraternity member run the 
event. 

"I am really fust here to help 
sell art," he said. 



Several attendees gave 
speeches. Jason Dockins, presi- 
dent of the Queer Straight Al- 
liance, spoke about how AIDS 
has affected his life. 

"I don't have AIDS, but I 
know several people that do." 
Dockins said 

There also was a piece of the 
AIDS blanket on display 

I really like the AIDS blan- 
ket," Wadell said 1 think that 
it is a great way to remember 
those lost to AIDS It just makes 
me remember how precious life 
really is" 




Asth* final 
tv»nt irttht 
World AIDS 
Aw»ftn«n 
WMk.27 
pieces of 
artwork by 
members 
of the 
community, 
students 
and profes- 
sors were 
auctioned 
off at Artists 
for AIDS 
Awareness 
silent 
auction, 

Jofrjm Brown 
tBUfGMN 



BOWL | Game will be televised by the NFL Network 



Continued from Page 1 

picking the Wildcats for their 
games The Texas Bowl se- 
lects last of the Big 12s bowt 
games. 

"Most of the conversation 
that had been taking place 
was between the Alamo and 
Insight," Weiser said "But it's 
hard for me to sit here with 
anything but excitement when 



we're sitting here v*ith a team 
that many predicted to finish in 
last place." 

Rutgers finished this war 
with 10 wins for iust the sw 
ond time in university history 
The season also marked the 
first time the Scarlet knights 
beat a Top- 15 team in school 
history when it beat No 3 Lou- 
isville 28-25 on Nov 9 

The Texas and Insight Bowls 



vcUl be the only two games tele 
vised m the NFL Network 
The network is not available 
tin wvvrul cable packages 

"The network is grow- 
ing and thriving." coach Ron 
Prince said "It's exciting to be 
a part of something that's new 
I think the real football pur 
ist will be involved, and it will 
draw subscribers and many first 
time people to the network" 



Toy programs meet holiday needs 



ByErkOwb 

KANSAS SMTKOUEGtAN 

Santa is not the only one 
bringing toys to children this 
holiday season. 

For the last 20 years, needy 
families have received toys for 
Christmas thanks to the Toys 
for Manhattan holiday gift pro- 
gram and the annual toy run 
put on by ABATE of Kansas, a 



motorcycle-riding organization. 

Both annual programs aim 
to help families in need. 

Toys for Manhattan is a 40- 
yew-old program, created by 
the community for the com- 
munity to help underprivileged 
families during this season 

ABATE's Saturday toy run 
fundraiser was in the form of a 
poker game with a $5 per hand 
entry fee. The bikers, who were 



given a playing card at each of 
the five stops on the run, com- 
peted for the best hand 

A biscuits and gravy break- 
fast before the run and a chili 
feed after both raised additional 
funds. 

"I enjoy participating in the 
day, because it gives children a 
Christmas that wouldn't other- 
wise get one," said Walt Gatsche, 
commander of the local VFW. 



DATING 

Continued from Page 1 

"1 see my parents like pio- 
neers almost," E J. said, 

E.J, also is in an interracial 
relationship His girlfriend, Au- 
dra Gardener, senior in apparel 
textile marketing, is white. 

Audra said friends some- 
times tease her about only dat- 
ing black men. 

While her parents seemed to 
have an issue with her previous 
relationships with men of a dif- 
ferent race, Audra said they have 
come to accept her choices 

"My family's had a couple of 
issues before when I was dat- 
ing other guys." she said. "I had 
dated a Jamaican guy before" 

E.J. said he does not think 
twice about his relationship with 
Audra, especially since he is the 



iKQpnil.tbte qti.iht,- si- . 

</5c self-serve 
copies 



child of an interracial couple 
Despite his comfort in his rela- 
tionship. E.). said he sometimes 
struggles with the idea of his own 
race and where he is accepted 

"I'm more accepted by the 
black culture than the while, be- 
cause I'm of color," he said. 

E.J said he frequently is con- 
fused for someone of a different 
race, but not necessarily black. 
If he grows a beard, E | said 
people mistake him as Middle 
Eastern. He's often confused for 
Hispanic and even Creole 

Although friends and fam- 
ily don't comment much about 
their different races now, Audra 
and E.J, said they constantly get 
double-takes from people. Au- 
dra remembered the time she 
and E.J were eating al Village 
Inn, and a middle-aged woman 
passed them several times, gawk- 
ing with an open mouth 

But E.J. said thai is expected 



"It's going to be the older 
couples," he said "Thai goes 
with both cultures." 

Audra said the looks don't stop 
with the older generation - she gets 
them from people of other races. 

"I also gel looks from black 
women," she said. "Black wom- 
en don't like it when you dip 
into their dating pool" 

Audra said she is quick to ap- 
proach others about their preju- 
dices when someone makes a 
derogatory comment about an- 
other race. 

"I cant change the world," she 
said, "but I can at least change a 
couple of people's minds" 

SLOWLY CHANGING 

The country has had a long 
history of prejudice and discrim- 
ination against diversity of race 
and backgrounds, said Liz Salett, 
president of the National Multi- 
cultural Institute in Washington, 



SmTSMASSAK 



l 



SODY FIRST 
587-8300 



The perfect 

way to start 

your day? 



can 




(3tale 




Tuesday, December 5 
7:30 p.m. Free 

McCain Auditorium 



DAVID LlTTRELl , CONDUCTOR 

Verdi, Mozart, Donizetti Arias: 
Cassandra Freyermuth, soprano 
Anthony Francisco, baritone 
Austin Short, tenor 

Craig weston: Elegy and Dance 
Anna Marie Wytko, faculty saxophonc soloist 

Mussorgsky: Pictures at an Exhibition (arr. Ravel) 



MUSIC 

\mt* <&m lit**** 



K- State Student U 



moil 



■ • 



invites vou to our 



Fall Commencement 

Buffet 



•nJ > *I^J D wjJB 

.. .IrvUuiJ, .-.U. 

A i n Bow Aim Jin 

Osi*rt«wl Ronw lemMsa ■/ Kuil Wi,,-n»l« 

|i,..An8-.,~.lk , ..lSL« 

I in mM H kwtti- 
ItkJ cVi tlipl 

■ ■J H,*flffiflill". O.iun 5*y 
Ai*«t«lBn«4 

I Mjmwl DBMftt 





114.95 Rr tWiMi (inaWw T#x) 

C«l> ...J L'™iit iui Onl, 

Reservations Re-quired 

!■*»- Rciervation. Call 785-532-60*)$ 

I man Hallmoni 

3nJI'L,.*K £ut.A«tW 




SATURDAY, DECEMBERS 200(> 

i * i > 

I \ Mill- {pill 



DC But things are changing for 
the better as people learn how to 
change their way of thinking 

The United States has re- 
sponded to diversity in mixed 
ways, Salett said, Some groups 
openly accept the need for 
change, while others do not 
want to bother. 

"I think there has been a very 
visible evolution in the last 20 
years," Salett said "I would say 
now there's a huge change There's 
a krt of talk about diversity. There's 
a lot more recognition, and I think 
the nation is responding.'' 

Juanita McGowan, director 
of K-Stale's American Ethnic 
Studies, said the United Suites is 
seeing more bi racial and multi- 
racial children, but the growing 
frustration has been racial-iden- 
tity development and how soci- 
ety wants to categorize children. 



"One of the greatest challeng- 
es t've seen is helping the child 
identify what they're going to be 
called," she said. 

Parents are giving their bira- 
cial or multiracial children col- 
or-blind responses, McGowan 
said, not preparing children to 
identify themselves 

In the 2000 census, Mc- 
Gowan said an increasing 
number of people checked the 
unidentifiable "Other" box for 
ethnicity. The category is one of 
the fastest-growing. 

Susan Williams, associ- 
ate professor of sociology, said 
younger generations seem more 
accepting of biracial relation- 
ships than older generations. 

"However, the question re- 
mains, is this a cohort thing, 
(hat is, specific to this particular 
generation, or will young people. 



too, grow more conservative 
with age?" she said "Overall, 
though, attitudes are very slowly 
changing, it seems." 

People like to feel they be- 
long, Williams said, and some- 
times those who choose to mar- 
ry outside their race are viewed 
unfavorably by other members 
of their race, 

"Very often, those of a mi- 
nority group are seen as sell 
outs if they marry whites," she 
said, "and sometimes whites 
who marry other races arc then 
denigrated, by some people who 
may feel threatened, as marrying 
down I dont see the big deal 
myself. After all, we're back to 
talking about something as insig- 
nificant, in my opinion, as skin 
color." 

— For * cemplcit version of this 
irtide, visit vrww.kitettcotltgicii.com. 



Sell Your Textbooks 

For CASH! 





at the 

K-State Student Union Bookstore 
Textbook Department 

Buy Back Hours: 

Mon, Dec 1 1th -Thu Dec 14th 

8:00 am - 8:00 pm 

and 

Fri, Dec 15th: 

8:00am - 6:00pm 




*Please Bring a Current Photo ID 
To Sell Your Books!* 




CLASSIFIEDS 



To place an advertisement call 



Monday, Dec. 4, 2006 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 9 



II Hi! 



II II 







J : : ■ J J _ ' ■ 



LET'S RENT 




ONE-BEDROOM ' NO 
smokers 1021 Fremont 
$386 ulilltlM Included. 

January less*. Monday- 
Friday 785-776-4805 




AVAILABLE SOON. Two- 
bedroom main floor of du- 
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mm laeu. On* Mock 
east of Aggieville 

785- 539-387;. 

FOt.'R BEDflOOk R 

I bath Fenced yard. 

gerege. Pelt ok Available 

December 785-317 7713 



Bulletin Board 



coking for a job? 

CHECK THE 

COLLEGIAN 

CLASSIFIEDS 



JJ 

Help Wanted 



ADMINISTRATIVE ASSIS- 
TANT Join our prolei- 
atonal team as we intro- 
duce CMePluj E -Govern- 
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US This ctuUeno.no posi- 
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STrTeTTOST^ou-: 

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CaTT5 Avmnastics & 

Dance in Wamego is seek- 
ing a dance Instructor lor 
law. tap & clogging 
classes and gymnastics 
coaches for recreational 
and team levels Please 
cell 785-458-8488 for add! 
ttonal Information, ask for 
Angie Curtis 



Help Wanted 



FIRST MANAGEMENT 
has a part-time leasing 
•gent position available 
for a busy apartment com 
mun*y Qualified appli- 
cants must have rekable 
transportation, a *Mfcig- 
ness to work a varied 
schedule. It is required to 
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gusi 6lh (or aparlmenl 
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V 

Rent-Apt Unfurnished Roommate Wanted 



w 

Sublease 




TWO-BEDROOM, one 

and one- halt bath, close 
to campus, otf-street park- 
ng $625, available Jan- 
uary, call 785-320-6300 



ROOMMATE WANTED 
lor a two-bedroom house. 
All appliances supplied 
Call 785-332-6152 ask for 
Erica. 



I LEARN TO FLV! K-Stata 

I Flying Ckib has five alr- 
Iplanes and lowest rales 
I Call 785-776-1744. www - 
|ksu.edu/ksfc 

Lost and Found 

|Loat and found ads can 
i placed free for three 
days. 



Housing Real Estate 



Re nt-Apt Furnished 

anhattan CITY Ordi 
ance 4814 assures ev- 
i person equal opportu- 
y In hou sing without dls- 
:lion on account at 
ce, sex, familial status. 
ary status, disability, 
color, na- 
tional origin or ancestry 
Violations should be re- 
orted to the Director of 
Human Resources at City 
Mall. (785)587-2440. 



Rent-Apt. Unfurnished 





TWO BEDROOM ONE 
bath, short term possible. 
Spacious CICo Park 
area. Appliances, central 
air Water/ trash paid 
Deck, off- street parking 
No pels Available Jan- 
uary. S525 
78 5-537-8420. 
785-341-5348 

TWO BEDROOM- ONE 
bath townhouse 1850 00. 
new construction. Also 
two -bedroom/ two bath 
apartment near the man, 
call Wildcat Property at 
785-537-2332 

UPSCALE ONE BE D- 

ROOM, close 10 campus. 
on-site laundry and fit- 
ness, gated parking 
$700, available January, 
call 795-320-6300 



roomMaTE — TOTO 

for Spring Semester. Nice 
house, otose to campus. 
Pels welcome. 
620-382-7241. 

SUBLET APAmVLNl '■■ 
August. University Cross- 
ing Non -drinker, great 
roommate, as soon as 
possible 913-709 8434 



Competitive wage, flexible 
scheduling Contact 
Nancy. Highway 99 and 
Main Westmoreland 
785-4572801 

SUBLEASER WANTED CREATIVE DIRECTOR 

as soon as possible Nice ocPius is the nations 

house dose to campus leading proider or Otv. 

$3507 month (wstllng to County, ana Sdwoi *eo- 

deal) * one-fifth utilities sum This « a tui-iime 

Call Brandi at Manhattan baaed pew 

785-448-0239 or amsi: i«n You ** tie in cruise 

bbuJZardffiksu edti n | dueling the creative 

SUBLEASE fT""^ANTED P™:»» 

tor Cathode women'e ■tomme. 

house. Two blocks from "D ** 

campus $310/ month In- pm*«*na 

eludes: utHlllee. food. rent. *" 5 ° neceeaeiy "> v'"> W 

Uve in dorms? May work customers outsumong 

and award winning web- 
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GRAPHIC DESIGNER 
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resume and design sam- 
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COOK NEEDED at Westy HA RHYS 
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HelpWanted 



TELEPHONY TECHNI- 
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tion is a fast growing 
voice networking (VOIP) 
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phony Technicians in 
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Positive attitude, profes- 
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MANHATTAN CITY Ordl- 
I nance 4114 assures ev- 
I ery person equal opportu- 
I nrty in housing without dis- 
tinction on account of 
race. sen. familial status, 
military slalus, disability, 
religion, age. color, na- 
tional origin or ancestry. 
Violation a should be re- 
ported to the Director of 
Human Resources at City 
| Hall, (785)587-2440. 

GREAT TWO-BED 

ROOM, close to campus 

i newly remodeled, off. 
street parking $650. avail- 
able December 1 . call 

] 785-320-6300 

LARGE TWO-BED 

ROOM. great open 
kitchen, dose to campus. 
Otl-street parking, laundry 
facility $720, available 
I January. call 

I 7B5-3ZO-630C 

NEW THREE BtU 
ROOM, two bath, Ihree 
parking spaces condo. 
820 North Manhattan 
Available January 2007 
$1350/ month 
| B 16-926-0454 

ONE on two-be" 

ROOMS available now or 
January 1 Only a few left. 
$295 and up. Hurry! Cap- 
stone Management 
I 785-34 1 -0686 

ONE-BEDROOM APART- 
MENT 1212 Kearney 
across Itom campus avail- 
able attar December 15lh 
785-539-7961. 

TWO-BEDROOM AVAIL 
ABLE lor January to Au- 
gust. Pals ok Dish- 
| washer $675/ month Call 
785-341-2940 or 

785-537 0205 



TWO-BEDROOM BY City 
Park with oft -street park- 
tng and laundry $600. 
available January, tall 
785.3206300 



AVAILABLE SOON Two- 
bedroom main Moor ol du- 
plex , Washer/ dryer. Six 
month lease One block 
east ol AgojBville. 
785-539-3672 

NICE TMREE-BED- 

ROOM, one balh avail- 
able January 1st. No pels. 
$660/ month. Yard, 
garage, close to campus 
Lots of storage. 

785-537-7354 

THREE, FOUR, FIVE. SIX 
PLUS BEDROOMS Look- 
ing for that perfect home 
to renf Greal selection 
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785-341-0686 

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plex, northwest of sta- 
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mg, or pels 765-539-1554. 

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pus lor next year June/ 
August leases all have 
central air. lull kitchens, 
and washer/ dryer Call 
now for best selection. 
785-341 1897 

TWO-BEDROOM 
HOUSE Available Jan- 
uary 1. 20O7 Close to 
campus. No pets Call 
785-539-1975 or 

785-313-4465 



TWO-BEDROOM ONE 
bath. $275 each, plus utili- 
ties. One block from cam- 
pus Need two spring sub- 
leasers Call 
620-874-5900 ask for 
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FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted. January - July 
Big five-bedroom duplex 
includes all appliances, 
off-street parking Beauti- 
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mates Call Courtney 
318-210-5975 

femalT 
nttdMl 



SUBLEASES 

One-bedroom one oath in 
two-bedroom two balh 
apartment $360 pat 
month, furnished Ava*- 
able January 1 . 
785-479-1235 or tt- 
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SUBLEASER WaNTe6 to 
share two-bedroom vt 
house Clean, quiet neigh- 
borhood. Washer/ dryer, 
otf-street parking. $400/ 
month. uUrHes Included. 
913-656-1411. 

WANTED 



rale with experience Ban- 
etas include health, den- 
ial paid noways, paid va- 
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include Cover letter 
your cepatuli- 



DAYT1ME 
NEEDED. 
Shifts 10am ■ 3pm on 
Mon-Wed-Fn and/ or 
Tues-Thurs Some night 
and/ or weekend availabil- 
ity Apply in person at 418 
Poynti Ave Good Pay 

KANSAS WHEAT is seek- 
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of Microsoft Access. Ex- 
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Send resume to dpeter- 
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Kansas Wheat. 217 South- 
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KS 66503, by December 
11. 2006. Equal Opportu- 
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MYSTERY SHOPPERS 
Earn up to $150 Experi- 
ence not required. Under- 
cover shoppers needed to 
judge retail and dining es- 
tablishments Call 

8O0 - 7gz - 4791 




Open Market 



FUTON FRAME- Do you 
have a good futon frame 
you need to get nd of 
Give me a cat I might 
Just buy it 785-556-0652 




^wuxtatfa 



1990 CHEVY Blazer 
LOTS of recent work, runs 
great! $2000 or Best Offer 
785-226-1620 



SUBLEASER 



tor second 
Four-bedroom 
house, washer/ dryer, 
dishwasher included 

Close to campus and Ag- 
gieville 620-271-2956 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 
needed lor one-bedroom 
for spring semester 
Would be living with two 
females. Close to Ag- 
gieville and campus 
913-449-2473 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 
needed immediately 

Close to campus, off- 
street parking $400 a 
month utilities included 
913-961-0873 




FEMALE ROOMMATE 
needed lor tour-bedroom 
house. $350/ month plus 
electricity. gas, SBC. 
Qui el. nice house, major 
appliances included. 

785-587-9207. 
785-2303006 

F-EMAIE ROOMMATE 
needed immediately. 

Clean newly remodeled 
three-bedroom, two bath 
house, garage available, 
washer/ dryer Call 
785-820-7612 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted lor three-bedroom 
house $300. utilities paid 
Call 785-537-4947 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted to share large 
apartment Two miles 
from campus Available 
mid December No Smok- 
ing/ pets $305 plus one- 
halt unfiles Call 
402-525 7947 

FEMALE ROOMMATEIS) 
non-smoking, lo break, 
train, show horses, etc 
lor rent. Prefer veterinar- 
ian, animal science ma- 
lots. PO Box 1211, Man 
hatlan. KS 66505 

RESPONSIBLE ROOM- 
MATE warned Quiet 
neighborhood two miles 
from campus. Washer/ 
dryer Nd pats $275/ 
month plus one-lortb utili- 
ties Kelly 785 565-9136. 
ROOMMATE NEEDED 
$325 per month, plus utili- 
ties Across street Irom 
campus, off-street park- 
ing. Available January 
2007 August 2007, 
783439-6926 



FEMALE SUBLEASER 
needed Rent $255 plus 
utilities OH-slreet parking, 
washer/ dryer, no pets, no 
smoking, four-bedroom 
I. km Katie 

785-230-7266. 

FEMALE SUBLEASE 
wanted to share four-bed- 
room/ two bath apartment 
First month nee. $315/ 
month Available now 
through July 2007 
907-232-4601. 

MALE SUBLEASER 
needed in January $300 
per month, plus one- third 
utilities Three-bedroom, 
two bath Call 
785-342-2932 

MAJ.E SUBLEASE 
needed Spring 2007. 
close to campus $300 
per monlh plus one-hall 
utilities Please call Bran- 
don Bayless 
785-230-0512 

ONE -BEDROOM NICE 
apartment, three minutes 
from campus. No pets 
$450 per month. C(i 
913-634-0874 available 
December to August, 



SUBLEASER 
Close to campus washer/ 
dryer Included $235/ 
month one-fourth utilities. 
Pets ok Call 
785-875-1813 

SUBLEASER WANTED 
Located across Irom Ag- 
gleville and campus Avail- 
able January 2007 to Au- 
gust Rent negol labie. 
Caff Chris at 
785-527-3259. 

SUBLEASED NEEDED 
tor January. Two-bed- 
room apartment close to 
AggleviNe and campus 
$400 plus utilities. Call 
816-668-9223 or 
913-709-8615. 

SUBLFASERS NEEDED 
for two-bedrooms in a 
tour -bedroom house. 

$325 a monlh . 

620-338-3675. 

5UBLH5EB5 VMUtLi 

spring 2O07 for three-bad- 
room, one and one half 
bath apartment. one 
minute walk to campus 
$780 per month or $280 
per parson plus electricity 
Contact ograyiSksu edu 
01913-481-1334 

THREE ROOMS available 
tor sublease in three-bed- 
room, one bath tor Spring 
semester. One block from 
AggievMe 917 Mora. 
$330/ month. 

785-317-1263 

TWO FEMALE Sub- 
leasers needed lor six- 
bedroom house All bUls 
included in rem, $329 per 
month. Cell Llndsey 
620-242^451 

TWO-BEDROOMS AVAIL 
ABLE in nice four-bed- 
room apartment Big 
screen, bar, deck, $250/ 
month, tun atmosphere 
January 1 Call 

913-909-2278 



ONE-BEbfiOOM SUB 
LEASE. Rent reduced 
Pets allowed Available 
December 20. 
316-61 7-5682. 

6ne-beor66m WITH a 
full bath available in a two- 
bedroom apartment Fur- 
rushed, cable No pets 
Washer/ dryer. Only $375/ 
month Immediately! 
785.317-6313 

quiet one-bedroom 

across from campus $500 
a month Water, gas, and 
trash paid. Available in. 
January 785-317-3188 

SUBLEASER NEEDED 
tor a six bedroom house 
Close to campus $260 a 
month plus one-sixth of 
utilities Januory through 
May 91 3-709-2248. 

SUBLEASER HeTdTu 

three bedroom, one and 
one hall bath apartment 
Half block from campus. 
near AggievlUe. $215/ 
month plus electricity 
dmtSkeuadu, 
316-259-2816 

SUBLEASER NEEDED 
January 1 One -bedroom 
apartment Close to Ag- 
gievlite and campus Rem 
$450/ month Cell 

913-909-2117 




Employment/Careers 




THE COLLEGIAN cannot 
verify the financial poten- 
tial at advertisements In 
the Employment/Career 
claaafflcallon. Reader* 
are advised to approach 
any such bust nets oppor- 
tunity with reesonabl* cau- 
tion The Collegian urge* 
our readers lo contact I ha 
Better Business Bureau, 
SOI SE Jefferson. 
TopeHa, KS 66607 1190 
(785)232- 0454. 

4 OLIVE'S Wine Bat now 
hiring lunch cooka Flexi- 
ble hours, competitive 
pay Apply in person 3033 
Anderson Avenue. 



EARN $2500+ monthly 
and more to type simple 
ads online wwwdelaen- 
trytyperscom 

EARN $800 - $3200 a 
month to drive brand new 
cars with ads placed on 
them, www AdOrrvaTeam • 
com 

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 

Manhattan Area Habitat 
for Humanity serves both 
the Riley County and Pot- 
tawatomie County areas 
In Kansas The Executive 
Director manages the affili- 
ate "s daily operations and 
resource development in- 
creasing fundraising ef- 
forts in order to sustain 
the organisation as a vi- 
able community resource 
Supervision of one part- 
time staff person also re- 
quired. Responsibilities in- 
clude the implementation 
of policies, procedures 
and actions as approved 
by the Board of Directors 
(and raccommend same) 
perseverance ol public ac- 
countability, and provk»ng 
assistance to committees 
(Church Relations. Family 
Selection, Nurture, Devel- 
opment. Restore). Qualifi- 
cations include a passion 
for Habitat lor Humanity's 
mission; proven expen- 
enca in a non-prof II organi- 
zation (administration, 
grant writing, creating and 
maintaining community re- 
lationships, fundraising): 
excellent interpersonal. 
written and verbal skills: 
and the ability to handle 
multiple tasks, meet dead- 
lines, speak publicly, and 
participate as a team 
player A lamilianty with 
home construction is a 
plus Exceptional account- 
ing skills and finance un- 
derstanding are required 
This is a three-fourths 
time position; compensa- 
tion dependent upon quali- 
fications and experience 
Applications available by 
contacting JoAnn R Sui 
ton. President, by catling 
785-341-4225. email sut- 
lon@mhaks.org, or by vis- 
iting the web at www man- 
hattanareahabitat org. Ap- 
plications must include a 
minimum of three refer- 
ences Resumes and whi- 
ten correspondence 
should be malted to: 
JoAnn R Sutton, Presi- 
dent, 1800 Denholm 
Drive. Manhattan. Kansas 
66503 



FOR SALE Ford Taurus 
2004. excellent condition 
Asking pnee $7 .500 or 
best offer 785-313-6366 

RETIRING FACULTY sell- 
ing low mileage Mitsubishi 
2000 Mirage excellent 
condition 38.800 
Manual, alr-condilioner 
stereo. $4200 

785-532-7178 Office 

785-776.9505 
;iti,k-,i,<: j im. tdu 



NETWORK TECHNICIAN 
Due to our recent expan- 
sion. Networks Plus haa a 
new opening lor a full- 
time Computer Network 
Technician In Manhattan. 
Positive attitude . profes- 
sionalism, strong work 
ethic and one or more 
years of computer support 
experience or equivalent 
training is required E-mail 
resume to |obs@network- 
spluscom In Microsoft 
Word oi Text formal 
Equal Opportunity Em- 
ployer. 

PART-TIME Furniture De- 
irvery Positions Flexible 
work schedule, great pay 
Slop by A Full House, 601 
S. 5th Street. 

765-537-9088 

PART-TIME PERSONAL 
cara attendant needed for 
a 19 year oU female. 
Wishing to attend Kansas Breakdiscounu com 
State this January Duties 600-838-8202 
would Include assisting DQNT MISS out 1 Spring 
dressing In the morning Break 2007 is approach- 

STS is offering 

to this year's 

destinations i 

lor savings 

visit 




Travel/Trips 



#t SPRING Break Web- 
site! Low Prices Guaran- 
teed Group discounts for 
6+ Book 20 people, get 3 
free trips 1 www. Spnng- 



Advertise 
it in the 

Collegian. 



and evenings. II inter- 
ested call 620-375- 2200 

PROGRAMMER CIVIC 
PLUS Is the nations lead- 
ing provider of city, county 
and school websites Full 

- time position in Manhat- 
tan. Microsoft ASP or 
SQL experience required 
$14 50/ hour plus health, 
dental, paid holidays, paid 
vacation and 401 (k) 
matching Email resume 
in Microsoft Word or lent 
format to 

SALES ASSOCIATE Pro 
vide customer service in 
the Art/ Technology de- 
partment. Price and stock 
merchandise, ability lo lift 
40 lbs., climb ladders and 
operate cutting equip- 
ment Position will also 
provide sales and service 
of cell phone plans and 
computers/ software. Pref- 
erence will be given to 
candid alas with back- 
ground or experience 
an techniques/ supplies, 
architecture or engineer 
ing Hours; Saturday 2pm- 
8p.m. and Sunday ifa.rn.- 

- 5pm Pick up applica- 
tion al Varney's Book 
Store 

STUDENT OFFICE Assis- 
tant needed in a fast- 
paced, often high traffic 
business office Must 
have good working knowl- 
edge of Word and Excel 
Must be a selt-mothralad. 
quick learner with a good 1 
attention to details and 
prool reading Previous of- 
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103 and include 
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mdiproperties.com ■ 785,776,3804 



su|do|ku 



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every column, and every 3x3 box 

contains the digits I through 9 

with no repeats. 



4 
7 



8 
5 



5 8 



8 3 



8 



3 
2 



8 



8 
1 




Solution and tips 
at www.sudoku.com 



2 OFF 

any regular or large sub 



Deadlines 



Claulf led ads must be 
plated by noon the day 
before you want your ad 
lo run Ouiitifd diipfey 

adi must be placed by 
4 p.m two working days 

prior to the date you 

want your ad lo run. 

CALL 785 532 6555 

F-m*il 





Classified Rates 



t DAY 

JO wortls or lets 

J 10.50 

each word over 20 

JOf per word 

J DAYS 

20 words or lesi 

.12 95 

each word over 20 

Hi per word 

3 DAYS 

10 wordi or lt» 

t15.6S 

each word over JO 

30« per word 

4 DAYS 

20 WcudS Or If i\ 

(1790 

e*eh word over 20 

35( per word 

5 DAYS 

20 word) oi lesi 
S20M 

each word over 20 
40* per word 

{consecutive day rate) 



To Place An Ad 



GotoKedile NSUcniH 

from the K-St<it« 

Student Union ) Office 

hours art Monday 

through Friday from 

8 e.m to S p.m. 



How To Pay 



All classified) mutt be 
paid in advance unlets 

you have an account 

with Student 
Publications Inc. Cash, 

check. MasterCard lit 
Visa are accepted. 

There is a S2S service 
charge on all returned 
checks We reserve the 

right to edit, reject or 
properly classify any ad 



Free Found Ads 



As a service to you, we 

run found ads tor three 

days tree of charge 



Corrections 



if you find an error in 

your ad, please call us. 

We accept responsibility 

only tor the first wrong 

Insertion 



Cancellations 



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before your ad has 

expired, we will refund 

you for the remaining 

days. You must call us 

before noon the day 

before the ad is to be 

published 



Headlines 



For an extra charge, 

we'll put a headline 

above your ad to tatch 

the reader's attention. 



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8 



t 



ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT | SEX | FOOD | YOUR LIFE 

THE EDGE 



Page 10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



It's in the ba 




Zotds gwwr San Strothmao s«4 "Sattn Hknforrhc holiday season " Anything aim, 
from r»n»iv- down ya-sJeeved Houses to haher dresses to trench coats to pencil 
skirts. It i good bet TV elegance and shme satin gives add holiday flair to any 
Mirtl. Accessories on be MM necklaces, bracelets, leggings or peep toed pumps 
— alii red — orgotden or patent leather red pwnpv The colon of the season are 
oartrH*^ light goM. black and forest given 






Mom's 9*ft; 

iYm* Atwewtv - for It* active mom. Buy her 
something WvtasaNe lor ninirtng errands on 



Mmmc JCrHineys New tnglaftd Patriot jersey, 

This women's pint Iffl piayorhmey packs a 
tough feminine punch so she won't be and on 
the smmmv ScfMD'prMt g ra p h ic s ,' team name 
on tent, mm logo on sleeves; player number 
on tenl hack and shooWen. Washable; nylon 




Female friend's gift: 

Tnafc Satin is In. tanember to buy her some- 
tNnfl ttenty. If she's ntrt (lie trendy type, then 
buy her something classic that wit work Mo her 



Where: toto 

Outfit 1 - light Ivory IM-sleeved sat* collared 
start W.wtrh thick black belt to accessorize and 
Madi skinny Jeans, $59. 

Out* 2 -Wad satin red tube gathered drew, $ 59 
WW»r(*ards 

kW*M««UMMb*MM,SR Black and red 
tOtUA/potyestec Imported. 




According M tf* AssoOartd Press, *Wiy back M MOS, the skull and ciossbones 
itemed *» a llgh*ear*ed**y to Mte» da*y hems -Barter Black brogues, 
cufflMtotwnl^la«nnVi2WM%a4KtMi with a little edge' Skulb 
am in far mens holiday we* At lest fesMmuMt iMn like m<>vlesur Nicholas Cage 
and even hip hop stars l*t JuetiSartaru itetheiRr:: Also men's cords can add 
me wkitiry took to any sweater Potoslwts, sport cnih and velvet blazers put some 
ciwerlniviwifeobtAa^tedMitdil^scirm^ 
shirts add fl* 



Dad's gift: 

Trtrtd: Lounoe wear - buy htm something to 
help him be more comfortable while la/tog 
around we house on the weekends. 
Whort; Sears, «0. 

CornfoftaWe but still sophisticated, he wort 
mind lounging bi thii sleek, tony aU g u rd 1 
robe. The tie-robe has a soft Brush fabric idea) 
foi wearing after a shower with to absorbent 
mattrW.iWifclwh^videssttpeftafitaiid 
comfort. Machine washable; 100 percent cotton 
Imported. 



* 



-buy bint 



MMtOtm 



Baby s gift: 

1m* Cute, purple pride. 

K-SUMMMiM. $27. 

Perfect far the new addition to the K-State family 




le friend's gift: 

Tret* Comfortable and fleece 

thing rr»nc> but comfy. 

WV^*V»: American Eagle 

Opl»nl-ltaa»dTra|f« r $i9.S0, 

Mt to wttrotaiidtlw elements, design^ wtth 

ratfin'styte.ThBtra^fc«tum»*afm^^ 

iwrtorar^iwterprwtwirto^esotarrteflerwr. 

Also Includes Jong *ar flaps with Eagle 

detail on It 

Option J- EasffctodlsutFWett. S*9 50 

Well worn, whip fleece feature* aft-over abra- 

aomfwaived-mto* TnermaWtned 

hood, front podwtj, ribbed cum and heem The 

tent •AE'appiMuegreesoffacoolJD effect 



by Shall* EJUs, Ilium Kiwi by Entity Uwmt. phM» by CatfliM l*MM |C01UHIMI 



Lohan attends AA meetings; mom OKs therapy 



By Erin Carlson 
ASSOCIATED PRESS 

NEW YORK - Lindsay Lohan 
has been attending Alcoholics Anon- 
ymous meetings, her 
publicist said Friday 

"She started at- 
tending some, and I 
think it's a positive 
thing," Leslie Sloane 
told The Associated 
Press. "My biggest 
fear is who's the big 
idiot to out which 
(chapter) she goes 
to." 




Lohan 

ACTRESS 



She said Lohan, 20, made the 
decision on her own to attend meet- 
ings, although Sloane added: "And, 
by the way, she's not saying ... she'll 
stop drinking tomorrow." 

"It's a place to go and feel sale," 
she said "No one judges her, and 
it's going to be a slow process. But, 
to me, the fact that she's seeing that 
there's something not right makes 
her smarter than the next person." 

tn an interview Friday with E! 
Entertainment Television's Ryan 
Seacrest, Lohan s mother, Dina, 
echoed Sloane's comments. 

"That is true ... It's a positive 
thing," she said 



The New York Post first reported 
sightings of Lohan at an AA meet- 
ing earlier this week. The actress, 
who's now filming "The Best Time 
of Our Lives," recumngly makes that 
paper's gossipy Page Six and other 
celebrity columns for her hard-par- 
tying ways. 

Sloane said she thinks the press 
was unfair to Lohan by ridiculing 
a statement the actress wrote after 
last week's death of Robert Altman, 
who directed her in "A Prairie Home 
Companion." 

A sad Lohan wrote the rambling 
letter "on the fly" on her Blackberry, 
Sbane said 



The letter, in which Lohan signs 
off with "BE ADEQUITE," has been 
criticized by a number of media ob- 
servers for its grammatical errors and 
misspellings, among other things - 
including exploiting Altman 's death 
for her own publicity purposes. 

Patt Morrison, a columnist for the 
Los Angeles Times, derided it on The 
Hufftngton Post Web site as "alarm- 
ingly incoherent" and said Altman 
might find it "comedic." 

"1 want everyone to leave her 
the hell alone," Sloane said. "I'm 
so bored of this with her. No mat- 
ter what she does, it's never good 
enough for everybody." 




LAUREN 

ROHRER 



Monday, Dec. 4, 2006 

Holiday 
singleness 
can benefit 

women 

The holidays can create a lot of 
stress. 

If you're anything like me, you have 
more than one family to visit and buy 
presents for. And 
single women like 
me have to re-visit 
my least favor- 
ite conversation of 
the year: the one in 
which people inquire 
about your life 
- more specifically, 
your luve life. 
I'm the baby of my 
rather large family. Everyone else is 
married, has children and spends their 
lives in the suburbs until the Banana 
Republic mothership comes to take 
them away. 1 am content with being 
the opinionated family oddball who 
remains steadfastly single (and around 
the holidays, steadfastly in the liquor). 
This, my last column of the semes- 
ter, is my gift to the single woman this 
holiday season. If you're the type of 
lady who has a gay boyfriend on speed 
dial for special events this season, this 
column it for you. 

There are many benefits for the 
single woman during the holidays 
that aren't highlighted nearly enough. 
Gift buying, for example, is much less 
exhaustive. I love that the only people 
1 have to worry about are my parents. 
They know all too well how broke I 
am and soil love and cherish the gin- 
gerbread house I made out of popsicle 
sticks 15 years ago. 

You also don't have to drag anyone 
else along with you. I hate introducing 
boys to my family. I love my relatives, 
but they are crazy rednecks with fire- 
arms readily available. They call me 
by my first and middle name (because 
that's what Oklahomans do) And 
they love to recall intimate details of 
my past every time I come home. Not 
having to share those intimate details 
with a boyfriend is a real blessing. 
Merry Christmas to me. 

However, not having a boyfriend 
also forces you to face the afore- 
mentioned horrible "Are you seeing 
anyone?" discussion. Which in my 
family generally means, "Did you find 
someone rich who's willing to many 
you and take care of you so we don't 
have to?" 

The answer for me is "No," and has 
been for quite some time. No, 1 don't 
have a boyfriend. No, I don't need 
a boyfriend 1 am enough. And I am 
complete just the way 1 am. 1 choose 
to be single, just like I choose to not 
listen to people who make marriage 
seem like the only possible pinnacle a 
life can have. 

So 1 urge my single friends to face 
these questions with all the integrity 
they can muster. And if some crazy, 
drunk aunt rolls her eyes and says to 
you, "Oh, well you say that now, but 
just wait until you're older," 1 suggest 
that, in the spirit of Chrismas, you fol- 
low your heart and say, "I'm 22 years 
old. Leave me the hell alone." 

God bless the single girl, every 
single one. 

Lauren Rohm ■ a senior h) musk and theater. 



THIS WccKt.t A look at events that occurred during this week in history, other bizarre holidays, happenings 



TODAY 



Natio 



naf Santa's List Day 



Whetheryou have been naughty or 
nke, Sanu Cuus knows the truth. 

But remember, just because you've 
been good or bad, you can always 
redeem (or screw up) your ranking on 
fJttfeMy old mens fat In the remaining 
19 days until he visits children around 
the world 

Set some time aside before your last 

51 to wrtte him a letter, and don't 
et to leave some milk and cooties 
lot the busy guy — nobody said 
deflwrlM toys to all the children around 
the www was easy. 



-^zn 



TUESDAY 



1876: Hundreds die in Brooklyn theater fire 

Afirealthe Brooklyn Theater in New York kills nearly 300 people and injures hundreds 
more on Dec S, 1876. Some victims perished from a cornbination of Iwrra aw) sniolw inhala- 
tion; others were trampled to death in the panic that ensued. rr>*r>ay "The Two Orpharts" 
was snowing. The theater was built five years earlier and al 900 seats were filled. Sometime 
near the start of the performance, a gas light Kjnrted some extra scenery stored In the fly 
space behind the stage It wasn't until midway through the play that stagehands noticed the 
quickly spreading flames. Unfortunately, there were no fire hoses or water buckets 



WEDNESDAY 



1884: Washington Monument finished 



On Dec. 6, 1884, In Washington, DC, 

workers place a 9 inch aluminum pyramid 
atop a tower of white marble, completing the 
construction of an Impressive monument to the 
city's namesake and the nation's first president, 
George Washington 



THURSDAY 



U.S. Cotton Candy Day 




four people — Thomas Patton, Josef Delarose LastaK, 
John C. Wharton and William Morrison — all have been 
named as the inventors of cotton candy 

Wharton and Morrison received a patent for the cotton 
candy machine in 1 899, They created the first electric cotton 
candy machine to melt and spin sugar through tiny holes 
using ceittrtfugal force. After the two candy makers from 
Tennessee received me patent Wharton and Morrison took 
the invention to the St. Louis Worlds fair 
in 1904. 

Today, cotton 
candy Is a great treat to 
\ enjoy at a circus, amuse- 
ment park or fair. Even 
though its beginning can 
be debated, it has become 
a top summertime candy. 




^9 



FRIDAY 



1980: John Lennon 
killed at apartment 

Singer John Lennon is shot and killed by Mark 
David Chapman outside his apartment building 
m Hew rork City. After committing the murder, 
Chapman waited calmly outside, reading a copy of 
"The Catcher in the ftye" 

Chapman was a troubled individual who wai 
obsessed with Hotden CauJfieW He thought Len- 
non was a phony and decided to plan his murder. 
Chapman purchased a gun m Hawaii and then - 
traveled to Hew York. Unable to buy buBets in 
New York due to strict laws, Chapman flew to 
Atlanta and purchased hollow-nosed rounds to 
bring back. . 

Souece:Ca«oWMfofomont*^,n«or»ift«- 
MLan for other stories. Photos: courtesy art 



i 




I /^K A N S A S STATE 

I Collegian 



INSIDE 

The Yosakoi 
dance dub blends 
tradition with 
modern elements. 

Ttwtd|tvP*g«iO 




w w w kit atetollcgwn com 



Tuesday, December 5, 2006 



Experiencing Manhattan 



Discovery Center 
museum to teach 
local history, 
draw visitors 



■y Magan Mour 

KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

A new attraction in the 
works is expected to bring 
60,000 to 100,000 visitors to 
Manhattan annually 

The Flint Hills Discovery Center, 
considered to be the cornerstone 
project of the city's downtown re- 
development initiative, received 
$41 million in funding via sales tax 
and revenue bonds from the state. 

The goal of the center is to edu- 
cate the public on the ecology, cul- 
ture and history of the Flint Hills. 

Its subject matter would include 
the Kansa Indians, the formation 
of the city and the beginnings of 
the university. Planners also expect 
the center would house traveling 
exhibits, like a Smithsonian exhibit 
called "The Last Stand." 

"It will celebrate the Flint Hills," 
said Karen Hibbard, director of the 
Manhattan Convention and Visi- 
tor's Bureau. "It's a huge undertak- 
ing, but for the community, it's go- 
ing to be a great attraction and an 
educational piece." 

The Discovery Center will be 
more than a traditional museum 
The plan might include special fea- 
tures like an aquarium with native 
animals or elevators with screens 
that show prairie fires and feature 
heat or other special effects 

"Visitors today want to experi- 
ence," Hibbard said. "They have 
been entertained. Now people 
want the authentic experience. To 




be a part of a prairie burn. To do 
hunting and fishing. To see what 
life is like - that's what the visitor 
is looking for." 

Hibbard said the added tourism 
from the Discovery Center, which 
will be at the corner of what is now 
Colorado Street and Third Street, 
would mean a need for more hotel 
rooms, restaurants and businesses. 

The STAR bond funding means 
city officials have a green light to 
continue planning for the project. 

"This was critical state financ 
ing," assistant city manager Jason 
Hilgers said "It allows us to move 
forward with a plan that has been 
in the works for a couple of years 
now" 

Hilgers said the project will re- 
quire $ 1 1 million for construction 
and $5 million to $6 million for ex- 
hibits and furnishings 

He said the city could break 
ground on the project in as little as 
two years. 

"We're probably looking at a 



ILLUSTRATION COURTESY OF THE CITY OF MANHATTAN 



year to design, a year and a half to 
design exhibits," he said 

The plans for the center include 
an exterior meant to resemble the 
rolling Flint Hills. The area will 
be heavily landscaped with native 
plants, and a waterfall from the 
second to the first level will simu- 



late a creek. 

Before the project can move 
forward, it must be approved by 
the City Commission, Hilgers said. 
Concept and feasability studies are 
still needed, too. 

"This is the culmination of sev- 
eral years of visioning," he said. 



Vol HI. No. 73 

/ 



Memorial 
to take place 
Wednesday 



ftyLe*nn! 
KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

There will be a memorial service 
Wednesday for a K-State student who 
died Nov. 30. 

Mary Dobbs, doctoral student in 
geography, died in her sleep of natu- 
ral causes. Dobbs was 44 years old. 

The funeral service will be 2 p.m 
Wednesday at the Bryant Funeral 
Home in Great Bend, Kin. 

Dobbs was an instructor of geogra- 
phy at Emporia State University. She 
would have finished her doctoral de- 
gree at K-State next spring. 

She is survived by her three chil- 
dren, Zachary, Rica and Thomas; her 
mother, Louise Bird, Great Bend; and 
her father, Carl Dobbs, Virginia. 



Brownback 
moves toward 
White House bid 



THf ASSOCIATED P«SS 

KANSAS CITY, Mo. - After tak- 
ing the first step in a presidential bid 
on Monday, Sen. Sam Brownback. 
R-Kan„ said he would start a 10 state 
tour with a traditional stop in Iowa. 

Brownback established an explor- 
atory committee that will allow him 
to travel the country and raise money 
while gauging support 

Brownback, 50, says his deep faith in 
God guides his opposition to abortion, 
gay marriage and embryonic stem-cell 
research. He pledged to make "issues 
of life," fiscal restraint and tax reform 
key components of his campaign 



Fraternity dedicates 
site of memorial 



ByMik. K.llv 
KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

The men of Alpha Phi Al- 
pha celebrated the fratemi 
ty*s 100th anniversary Mon- 
day by dedicating ground for 
a bust of Martin Luther King 
Jr. 

The bust will be on the 
east side of Aheam Field 
House and will be unveiled 
on Jan. 19, 2007. It is impor- 
tant to the fraternity as well 
as to the K-State campus, 
said Brandon Clark, multi- 
cultural coordinator for the 
K-State Alumni Association 
local agency and member of 
Alpha Phi Alpha 

"The bust that will be 
placed here is really signifi- 
cant to Kansas State" Clark 
said. "Dr. King spoke at 
Aheam in 1968, and it was 
the last college campus he 
spoke at before he was assas- 
sinated We could think of 



no better way to honor him 
and honor his legacy than to 
put his likeness on our cam- 
pus." 

When the bust is unveiled 
in January, the adjacent street 
on campus will be renamed 
Dr Martin Luther King [r 
Boulevard. 

"This is truly an appropri 
ate way to recognize a man 
that changed the world," 
Clark said. 

King spoke at Ah earn in 
early 1968, shortly before he 
was assassinated on April 4, 
1968, in Memphis, Tenn 

As a member of the Alpha 
Phi Alpha fraternity, King 
was honored along with oth- 
er alumni during a libation 
ceremony on the day of the 
fraternity's centennial cel- 
ebration 

"A libation ceremony is an 
ancient African tradition of 

See FRATERNITY PageS 



Lunchtime festival allows cultures 
to demonstrate holiday traditions 



By Austin Appla 

KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

The K-State Union Courtyard 
was transformed into a multi- 
cultural cafe and theater Mon- 
day afternoon for the Festival of 
Holidays. 

The monthly Festival of Na- 
tions typically features just one 
culture, but the Festival of Holi- 
days featured the holiday tradi- 
tions of many cultures, said Shea 
Olsen, graduate adviser for the 
Union Program Council's mul- 
ticultural committee, the event 
sponsor. 

"It allows us to showcase our 
cultures and give a lunchtime 
program as well," Olsen said. 

Students enjoyed free food 
and watched performances from 
noon to 1 p.m. 

Performers included belly 
dancers, Yosakoi and Alpha Phi 
Alpha. 

The belly dancers performed, 
and then the Yosakoi dance 



team performed two dances. 

"This is our second time per- 
forming for the K-State Student 
Union festival," Seiji Ikeda, Yo- 
sakoi dance team coach, said 

After Yosakoi, Alpha Phi Al- 
pha performed a step-dancing 
routine. 

"Step -dancing has been a part 
of our traditions since around 
the 1960s," Brandon Clark, Al- 
pha Phi Alpha adviser, said 

Stepping is a tradition among 
African-American fraternities, 
with origins in Africa, Clark 
said. 

Deisy Corredor, graduate stu- 
dent in biological engineering, 
said she thought the participa- 
tion for the event was less than 
normal, but the holiday celebra- 
tion was a good idea. 

Juan Salazar, graduate stu- 
dent in chemical engineering, 
said he enjoyed the festival 

"It's good to have traditions 
from around the world in this 
place," Salazar said. 




Atthannal 
perfor- 
mance of 
thtFMttval 

of Holidays 
Jonathan 
Scott 
freshman 
in business 
administra- 
tion pre- 
professional, 
dances with 
Alpha Ptu 
Alpha frater- 
nity. The men 
of Alpha 
Phi Alpha 
performed a 
step dance 
routine In 
keeping 
with their 
organization's 
tradition j. 

Jouyn Brown 

COLLEGIAN 



Today's forecast 

Mostly sunny 
High: 50 Low: 27 



INSIDE 



Clash of the columnists 

Are the Wiltkats' basketball troubles severe 
enough to begin questioning coach Bob Hugglns' 
Find out where the columnists tund. 
See sports Page 6 



CAMPUS NEWS HIGHLIGHTS 



Crops team takes 2nd 

The Coll eg lite Crops Team fin- 
ished second at the Chicago Colle- 
giate Crops Contest at the Kansas 
City Board of Trade Collegiate 
Crops Contest. Nick Guetterman 
and Matt Padua, both Juniors 
in agronomy, and Zane Unrau, 
senior in agricultural technology 
management, participated. 



11 join honor society 

Eleven students joined the Phi 
Upsilon Omlcron honor society, 
an honor society for students in 
family and consumer sciences. 
Since 1960, the society has 
recognized students who haw 
achieved excellence In scholar- 
ship, leadership and service 
There are 59 collegiate chapters 
of the society 



Dean recognized 

Wendy Qmelas, associate dean of 
the College of Architecture, Plan- 
ning and Design, was presented 
with the Henry W. Schlrmer Dis- 
tinguished Service Award by the 
American Institute of Architects 
Kansas at its fall 2006 meeting. 
She has been a member for more 
than 20 years and is the first 
female to receive the award 



America's top priority 

More than two-*** of Americans want me president and Congress b mike the 

Iraq war the* top priority, the highest levHsiw the measure be^in^ 2006 

100 
1 10 
I 60 
I 40 

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April May kine Jury Aug. Sept. Oct. Nw. 




Page 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Tuesday, Dec. S, 2006 



r Call 



776-5577 

Puzzles | Eugene Sheffer 




ACROSS 
1 Acknowl- 
edge 

S Jewel 
8 Privation 

12 Arrive- 
dercl 

13 Past 

14 Uncon- 
trollable 

15 Bear 
naise 
mgred»eni 

17 Say it 
isn't so 

18 Hoi lub 

19 Emo- 
tional 
pang 

21 Ghosl 
costume 

24 Afore- 
men- 
tioned 

25 Chopped 

26 Large 
brass 
con- 
tainer? 

30 Exist 

3i -csr 

setling 

32 Eggs 

33 Moliere's 
miser 

35 Tourney 
situations 

36 Work 
units 



37 Miss 
America's 
topper 

38 Undo 
veloped 
state 

41 Pooch 

42 Speaker's 
spot 

43 Serving 
cart 

48 Busy 
with 

49 Take a 
shot at 

50 Grimace 

51 Adoles- 
cent 

52 -Undeni- 
ably" 

53 Play 
area 

DOWN 
1 Perfor- 
mance 



2 By way 
ol 

3 Rowing 
tool 

4 Decline 

5 Enthusi- 
astic, 
plus 

6 T strain 

7 Billings 
resident 

8 Preten- 
tious 

9 Portent 

10 Medley 
compo- 
nent 

11 Terrier 
variety 

16 Suitable 

20 Sanity 

21 Persian 
leader 

22 Argo- 
nauts' 
patron 



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acces- 
sory 

24 State 
flowers ot 
Utah 

26 David 
Copper - 
field's 
nanny 
Clara 

27 The 
Naked 
Maja* 
painter 

28 Finished 

29 Houston 
acronym 

31 Change 

34 Individual 

35 Two rites 
making a 
wrong? 

37 Drag 
along 

38 Shorten, 
maybe 

39 Neck 
hair 

40 Chomp 

41 Week 
units 

44 Before 

45 — long 
way 

48 "— Miss 
Brooks'' 

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VI II J D P R E X 



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I I) / R V X y Y Li A A D K J A ft A I- 

A I 1 V F Q HEW, B Y K I. A III W 

11// ALIA I Y X X - U K /. Y X K ? 
YrxlrrdaY» Cnplequip: WHAT WOl'LD VOL! 
CALL A SKUNK' TRAPPED INSIDE YOUR CAR 
TIRE' I'D SAY HE S A WHEEL STINKER! 

Today \ Crvrxiiquip CIul- A t-qtiiih T 



DIVERSIONS 

A waste of time — but you might learn something 



Beer pong requires offensive, defensive maneuvers 



Beer pong, also called Beirut, is a popular 
drinking game among college students. While 
there are many variations to the rules, here are 
the most bask. Mute: cup sizes, amounts, num- 
ber of balls and beverage levels can be altered 
according to the players involved. Beer pong 
does not have to be played with alcohol; how- 
ever, should alcohol be the beverage of choke, 
the Collegian asks players lo be of legal drink- 
ing age and to act responsibly 

1. The game 

1.1 General 

The game of beer pong (orutsb of attempting to remow all 
[)ftteopposu>gleam'saipftrjrrtfieur*ina(cofdancewrth 
the rute. The first team to remove all of the opposing teams 
tups from the table is dedared the winner 

2. The players 

2,1 Formation of teams 

Each team shall consist of two playffi. 

3. The balls 

3.1 Form and make of balk 
The game shall be played with one table terms ball. 

4. The cups 

4.1 Form and make of cups 

Cups shaK be plastic and have a volume of 1 6 omen, 
A2 Cups contain beverage 

The cups shall contain about 3 -4 ounces of a beverage that 
shall be determined before the start of the game. 
4.3 Arrangement of cups 

tach team shall defend si* cups arranged in the shape of a 
triangle. The triangle shall be 4 inches from the end of (he table. 
MjwifiU ntlrom either side ol the table, and with the base of the 
triangle parallel to the end of the table 

5. Order of play 

5.1 Shooting order 

Teams shall take turns shooting the ball. Each team shall 
alternate shooting within their team on i turn -by-tum basis. 
5 2 Redemption 

When a shooter hits the opposing teams final cup, the 
cup shall remain on the table, and the opposing team shall be 
allowed an additional turn to attempt redemption. 




5J.1 Successful redemption 

The redemption shooter shall have achieved redemption 
if they successfully hit all of the opposing team's cups without 
missing a shot Subsequently, the ball shall be returned to the 
team that originally hit the opposing team's hnal cup, and 
overtime shall begin 

522 Unsuccessful redemption 
If the redemption shooter fads to achieve redernption, their 
teams final cup shall be removed from the table. 

6. Offense 

6.1 Definition 

A player shall have shot the ball when having been desig- 
nated the shooter they propel the ball forward from a position 
within the shooting area with the intention of sinking it in one 
of the Opposing team's cups. A shot can be made rt any fashion 
as long as it is not aided by the shooter's teammate, spectators 
or an artificial device, A bounce shot shall be defined as shooter; 
attempt to shoot the ball short ol the cups with the intention 
that rt will bourne off the surface of the table intoa cup 

7. Defense 

7.1 Definition 



Defense is defined as a defender's attempt to prevent a 
legally shot ball from sinking in th* cups by directly or indirecuy 
applying force to the ball usmg their body after fist contact has 
occurred. Fist contact t> defined as the initial contact between a 
legally shot ball with any outside agency on or off the surface of 
the table, the cups or the surface of the table, exrluding players 
and spectators. Acceptable methods of defense indude, but are 
not limited to utdvno, swatting, hooking and blowing, 

8. Sinking the ball 

81 Definition 

A ball shall be deemed sunk it while it is in play, it contacts 
the surf*ie of the beverage contained within the cup A cup shall 
be deemed hit if a ball has been sunk In it A cup that has been 
deemed hit shall be removed from the table. 

The defending team may choose any method of cHemwwg 
which player shall consume the beverage contained m a cup 
removed from play 
8J Cup consolidation 

Following cup removal, the remaining cups shall not be 
consolidated or rearranged. 
Source: Mtpy/Dtrn/r-puide, com 



The planner 

Campus bulletin board 



The planner is the Collegian's campus bulletin board 
service. Items in the calendar can be published up to 
three times. Items might not appear because of space 
constraints but are guaranteed to appear on the day of 
the activity. To plate an item in the Campus Calendar, 
stop by Kedzie 116 and fill out a form or e-mail the 
news editor at colteglonmpub.kiu.edu by 1 1 a.m. two 
days before it is to run. 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral 

defense of the doctoral dissertation of Jianbin Yu at 2 
p.m. today in Throckmorton 2002. 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral 
defense of the doctoral dissertation of Janis Crow at 
2:30 p.m. Wednesday in Calvin 217. 



■ The KSU Save Darfur Team is collecting new 
and used youth and children's clothing, personal 
care items like toothpaste and soap, and school sup- 
plies (ot Darfur refugees in Sudan, Africa. Donations 
will be accepted in a collection box in the Union 
Courtyard until Dec. IS. 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral 
defense of the doctoral dissertation of Patricia Mano- 
salva at 9 a.m. Monday in Throckmorton 4031. 



The blotter | Arrests in Riley County online at www.kstatecollegian.com. 



Corrections and 
clarifications 

Corrections and clarifications run in this space. If you 
see something that should be corrected, cal news 
editor Leann Sulien at (7851 532-65S6 Of e-mail 
(oltfqtwi'yob.ksutdu- 

Kansas State Collegian 

[USPS 291 020) The Kansas State Collegian, i 
student newspaper at Kansas Stale University, Is 
published by Student Publications Inc., Kedw 103, 
Manhattan, KS 66506 The Collegian is published 
weekdays during the school year and on Wednes- 
days during the summer Periodical postage is paid 
at Manhattan, KS 66502 POSTMASTER: Send ad- 
dress changes to Kansas State Collegian, circulation 
desk, Kedoe 103, Manhattan, KS 66506-7167 
v Kansas State Collegian, 2006 



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Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2006 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 3 



City honors renovation, preservation of train depot 



ByJ*stt S»chtttv» 

KANSAS STAN (OUIGIAN 

During the City Commis- 
sion meeting tonight, the 
community will recognize 
the completion of a project 
nearly eight years in the mak- 
ing. 

A pari of the city since 
1866, The Manhattan Union 
Pacific Depot had sat empty 
since its last train rolled out 
in 1984 After the City of 
Manhattan took over owner 
ship of the building in 1990, 
the Manhattan/Riley County 
Preservation Alliance began 
-campaigning to preserve the 
"depot as a historical land- 
mark. 

It wasn't until 1998, when 
architecture firm of Bruce 
McMillan Architects began 
the depot's reconstruction, 
that the project began to take 
shape. 

The depot reopened in a 
public ceremony on June 3. 
McMillan Architects caught 
the attention of the Kansas 
Chapter of the American In- 
stitute of Architecture, The 
project won the 2006 Honor 
Award for Renovation /Pres- 
ervation 

"The project was broken 
into three phases over the 
years. The award honors the 
completed effort." Bruce Mc- 
Millan, chief architect, said. 
"But this ceremony with the 
commission isn't just for us. 
It's a recognition of a wide 
common group effort by the 
community" 

The depot's long history 
recently was recounted as 




Jodyrv Brown | COLLEGIAN 

Afttr beginning restoration in 2001, the Manhattan Union Pacific Depot was rededicated on June 3 The depot is now used for conferences, weddings, meetings and parties. 



part of associate professor 
ol libraries Tony Crawford's 
Keepsakes series on the K 
State Libraries Web site 
Among the depot's highlights 
was a 1903 visit from Presi- 
dent Theodore Roosevelt as 
part of his "Whistle Stop" 
campaign across the United 
States. Roosevelt spoke to 
the gathered crowd from the 
back of the train's caboose 



After an overly warm wel- 
come by the K Stale band, 
Roosevelt commanded the 
director to "Stop that in- 
fernal band!" as his speech 
was limited to 15 minutes, 
and he didn't want to waste 
any time As a final message 
to the students of the then- 
Kansas State Agricultural 
College, Roosevelt said, "I 
believe in play, and I believe 



in work. When you play, play 
hard, and when you work, do 
not play at all" 

Crawford said he hopes 
the series reminds people the 
depot isn't just "that old place 
behind the mall." and that it 
has deep ties to K-State and 
the community. 

Though it won't see trains 
rolling in any time soon, (he 
depot is now used as a multi 



Timeline of the Manhattan 
Union Pacific Depot: 



M9S1:Thedepot 

is damaged in i 
city wide flood. 



purpose facility, able to host 
exhibits, conferences, parties 
and even weddings. 

Linda Glascow, member of 
the Manhattan/Riley County 
Preservation Alliance, said 
the alliance still is involved 
with the depot. Glascow also 
works as an archivist for the 
Riley County Historical Mu 
seum, 

"The alliance just received 



1M4: The depot slops 
serving height trains. 



a grant from the Caroline 
Pine foundation to provide 
some new enhancements to 
the depot," she said. "New 
blinds and (audio/visual) 
equipment are some of the 
new things Hopefully they'll 
help the depot to become a 
highly sought venue" 

The City Commission 
meeting honoring the depot 
project is at 7 tonight. 

1 1 2001: Restoration of 
the depot begins. 




tIMo: Manhattan's original, 
wooden depot is built. 




1M2:The existing brick 
one -story depot is built 
for 5 10,000. 



kl 938: The depot is remodeled to provide 
electricity and heat. 



passenger trains 



lan takes over ownership 
of the depot, and it is made 
part of the Manhattan/Ri- 
ley County Preservation 
Alliance. 



The restored 
depot is [dedicated 
in a public ceremony 
on June i. The depot 
will bt a multi-use 
Facility suitable for 
conferences, meet- 
ings, weddings and 
parties. It is managed 
by the Manhattan 
Paries and Recreation 
Department- 



Visitors can still reserve hotel rooms for graduation weekend 



By Dustin Sanborn 
KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

Families shouldn't panic 
yet - hotels are still available 
lor graduation weekend in 
Manhattan. 

Many hotels said il is busi- 
ness as usual, even with the 
upcoming graduation ceremo- 
nies. Hotel managers said they 
are used to the influx of peo- 
ple during the football season, 
so graduation weekend isn't 
much different. 

"During this busy season 
we check the rooms a little 
more thoroughly to make 
sure everything is just right," 



said Sherry Sharp, front desk 
worker for Best Western of 
Manhattan 

Some hotels still have 
rooms available as of Monday 
afternoon. 

■ Econo Lodge, 1501 lull It- 
Creek Blvd. - Has IS rooms 
available lor Saturday night 
only. Rooms cost $59.95 a 
night. Call (785) 539-5391. 

■ Fairfield Inn, 300 Colorado 
St. - Rooms available for Sat 
urday night only. Room prices 
range from $119 to $129. Call 
(785) 539-2400 or toll-free at 
(800) 228-2800. 

■ Comfort Inn, 1 50 E. Poyntz 



Ave, - Has one smoking king 
suite for $145 95 available on 
Friday. Saturday room prices 
range from $1 15 95 to $145.95. 
Call (785) 770-8000 
■ Molel 6, 510 Tuttle Creek 
Blvd. - Has rooms available 
for Saturday only. Rooms are 
$61.99 a night. Call (785) 537- 
1022. 



■ Best Western, 601 Poyntz 
Ave. - One Jacuzzi room, one 
king room, and a two-queen 
room are available for Friday 
night Many rooms are avail- 
able for Saturday night. Prices 
range from $89.95 to $149.95 
a night. Call (785) 537-8300. 

■ Regency Inn, 419 Holiday 
Drive - Has 25 rooms avail- 



able for Friday night and 35 
rooms for Saturday night 
Rooms cost $100 a night. Call 
(785) 537-0630. 
■ Clarion, 530 Richards 
Drive - Has 25 rooms avail- 
able fur Saturday night only. 



Rooms arc $129 a night Call 
(785)539-5311 
■ Rjnudj Inn. It--* I Ander 
son Ave. - Has many rooms 
available for Friday and Satur- 
day night Rooms are $119.95 
a night. Call (785) 539-7531. 




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Are you graduating in December? 

REPORT YOUR JOB! 

Help us compile career details about K-Stale graduates. 



H mui M*t* Urn»*i illy 
IOOHhHM'jII 



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Clkk on the "Report Your Job'kon 
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OPINION 



Page 4 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2006 



Impending oblivion 

Bans on home-cooked meals, demands to make nice with Axis of Evil' signal end of times 




I fully plan to spend the 
encroaching holidays lying in a bul- 
wark of ammo, frozen pizzas, bot- 
tom-shelf whiskey 
and dirty maga- 
zines in prepara- 
tion for the end of 
the world - which, 
consulting Hogg's 
magic eight ball of 
divine guidance, 
will be right after 
my last final, 
" Evil events lurk 
on the horizon. The insane frolic 
at our impending doom Oil prices 
rise, Congress reconvenes, milk 
goes sour before the given expira- 
tion date - portents of further hor- 
rors to come. 

As a start, the government in 
Fairfax, Va., has started to lay the 
kibosh on shelters serving home- 
cooked meals in onerous attempts 
to enforce health codes. Given the 
voracity with which most people 
consume home-cooked meals 
(sometimes two or three times a 
day), we're left to wonder what in 
hell we arc worried about. 

We are all. doubtlessly, awash in 
the fact that grandmother's pantry 
is the place where beakers of poi- 
son and bacteria glow malevolently 
next to Bacos and bags of pasta, 
patiently waiting for the church 
politick Having known the home- 
less and seen the banquet lying in 
the dumpster for the enterprising to 
discover, one wonders how bureau- 
crats prepare food if they consider 
the garbage buffet preferable to 
mom's PB and j sandwiches 

If this foul portent is an uncon- 
vincing argument that the fury of 
the damned is nigh a week away, 
I present Keith Ellison, a Min- 
nesota Democrat and our first 
Muslim Congressman, and the 
ensuing uproar after he said he 




would prefer to take his oath on 
the Quran rather than the standard 
Bible at his swearing-in. 

To this we pose: do we desire 
Muslims swearing oaths on a Bible, 
a book that means, roughly, jack 
to a practitioner of Islam? Given a 
litany of choices for swearings- in. 
I'd rather utter sacred mantras over 
something of personal importance 
- 1 do not suppose I will feel some 
great revulsion welling up inside 
if I abscond with sacred promises 
solemnly murmured over a copy of 
"Moby Dick." 

Onward we go - chubby pundits 



issue forth joyful hope, then anx- 
ious clamoring and finally bloody- 
fanged demands that we coalesce 
with Iran and Syria in some man- 
ner of sacrificial offerings to the 
sulfurous gods of the Middle East. 
That we now actively converse with 
nations once considered parts of 
the "Axis of Evil" or "beyond the 
Axis of Evil" (Episode V: The Axis 
Strikes Back) illustrates the cav- 
ernous depths of despair we now 
explore. 

If our time was spent deliberat- 
ing with those who wish us success 
in the region, we might find some 



reason for the ongoing festivities. 
Both Iran and Syria openly have 
wished us dismal fortunes in the 
region - seeking their advice for 
success is much like sending the 
playbook to the opposing team's 
head coach for suggestions. I do not 
spend my precious free moments 
conversing with Holocaust deniers 
and those wishing annihilation 
upon entire nations. If our elected 
leaders are penciling them onto 
their calendars, perhaps we have 
our priorities misaligned. 

We are in no danger of find- 
ing ourselves in absence of things 



to herald our impending oblivion. 
Indeed, entire forests of paper 
shudder in terror that such a list 
someday will manifest itself. 

I can but steel myself for the 
thunderous approach of dooms- 
day, and in the interim between 
the holiday shopping of today and 
the fiery, fiery Armageddon of next 
Wednesday, construct my mighty 
bastion of love and firearms. 



Those wishing entrance into the Hogg i Grind 
Temple of Impending Obliteration should send 
compromising photos and a S10O application 
ft* to OplOnWipJOuMtti.toV 



Schools should focus on academics, not racial quotas 



Should schools choose 
what students can attend on the ba- 
sis of race, or should children attend 
the schools closest to them? 

White parents from the Jef- 
ferson County Public School 
district in Louisville, Ky., told 




the US. Supreme Court on Monday that their 
children were denied their first school prefer- 
ence solely because of the color of their skin. 

Today the court will decide wheth- 
er the school district, by engineering 
racial diversity in its schools, acted in 
a constitutional manner. 

Does this scenario ring a bell? 
The infamous core issue of Brown v. 
Board of Education has resurfaced. 
more than 50 years after the Supreme 
Court ruled that separate schools 
inherently are unequal 

According to the Associated Press. 
children were denied entrance to the schools 
of their choice, at least initially, for no reason 
other than the color of their skin, a policy 
backed by the Bush administration. 

Blacks make up 34 percent of the student 
body in the Jefferson County Public School 
system, which wants to limit the black stu- 
dent population of each school to no less 




SHEILA 
ELLIS 



than 15 percent and no more than 50 percent. 
This is a nice effort by the Jefferson County 
Public School system, but racial diversity can- 
not be created mathematically. Just 
because you throw these children in 
school together does not mean they'll 
team about diversity and how to inter- 
act with other cultures. 

Maybe what's wrong is our soci- 
ety. Races tend to flock together in 
communities and neighborhoods. It's 
nearly inevitable, then, that they will 
end up at the same schools. 
Here's an idea: maybe schools 
should spend more money focusing on 
academic excellence instead of how many 
children of each race attend the schools. 

According to the AP, the district argues 
this program "significantly advances the goal 
of teaching students how to participate in a 
democracy that has formed a single society 
out of many diverse people." 



Many schools won't admit they use racial 
quotas when assigning children to schools, 
but It does happen 

I can attest to this personally. As a product 
of the USD 501 school district in Topeka, I 
have experienced racial quotas. 

My high school was almost 60 percent 
minorities So when girls tried out for the 
cheerleading squad, certain talented minor- 
ity girls did not make it simply because the 
school could not have an all-black squad. 

As much as schools want to say things are 
equal between minority schools and majority 
schools, it just isn't true. 

Hopefully the Supreme Court will make 
the right decision today, or when we have 
children we might have to drop them off at 
schools across town to meet racial quotas. 



Shed* Erin is a sophomore in journalism. Please send com 
menu to opinion- iiipubAut.*dv. 



/^K k M 5 k S S I i. T f 

LOLLEGIAN 



Emily LawrtfK* 1 1 . W ion IN (MB E 

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WRITE TO US 

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They can be submitted by e mail to tetttrs@spub. 
Jbu.fdu, or in person to Kedzie 1 16 Please include 
your full name, year in school and major letters 
should be limited to 250 words. All submitted 
letters may be edited for lencjth and clarity. 

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Tfi TUP PfilMT I * n edi,0 ' ial selected and debated by the editorial board and written after a majority 
I \J I nt r UMN I | opinion is formed. This is the Collegian's official opinion. 

Holiday season presents chance to help 
less fortunate, those without family 



The holiday season is here. 

While most of us are trudg- 
ing through the final two 
weeks of school so we can go 
home to be with our families, 
we also should think of those 
who don't have relatives with 
whom to celebrate. 

The holidays can be a 
depressing time of year for 
many. Those who have lost 
loved ones might see the holi- 
days as a sad time because 
those loved ones are not here 
to celebrate 

Also, many elderly people 
who live alone don't have 



family to visit during the holi- 
days. 

The winter season is a 
generally depressing season. 
It's usually cold outside, and 
everything that was green 
in the spring and summer is 
dead and brittle in the winter. 

If you are spending the 
holidays with family, remem- 
ber those around you who 
might be less fortunate. 

Invite your elderly neigh- 
bor over for a holiday dinner, 
present him or her with a gift 
basket, or donate food to a 
local charity that provides 



for those in need. As you 
walk out of Wal-Mart loaded 
with Christmas presents, 
add your change to the red 
buckets positioned outside of 
the exits and offer a friendly 
hello to the volunteer ringing 
the bell. 

While the holidays are 
meant to be spent with family 
and friends, remember those 
who don't have anyone with 
whom to share the holidays. 

Get in the holiday spirit 
and help those who need it 
Your holiday season will be 
more satisfying if you do. 



CAMPUS F0URUM 

395-4444 -or- 

fourum@spubMsu.edu 

The Campus fourum is the Collegian's anony- 
mous call-in system. The fourum (s edited to 
eliminate vulgar, racist obscene and libelous 
tomments. The comments are not the opinion 
of the Collegian nor are they endorsed by the 
editorial staff 

Coming from people In Goodnow and 
Marlatt people in ft lot. 

The fat* of the world will be decided as It 

should be: in Mortal Kombat. 

Am I allowed to say "ass" in the Fourum? 

Rebecca, your ass is mine. 

Nn law* Marti more than anyone in the 
entire world. 

8ecca and Mart make sweet, drum set music 



This is the tntlrc fourum for today. Please 
chock tomorrow's Collegian for mw com- 
ments. 



I 



X. 



Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2006 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Pages 



TO THE EDITOR 

ACLU defends Christians, other religions 



Editor, 

I read with shock and awe 
the editorial demonizing the 
ACLU as "hating Christians" 
and being and- Christmas. As a 
card-carrying member of that 
honorable organization, 1 must 
respond to correct this absurd 
misrepresentation and the 
damaging tactics it embraces. 

Just for the record, I count 
some 3? cases in recent years 
that the ACLU has defended 
Christians and Christian orga- 
nizations for freedom of reli- 
gious opinion. And this doesn't 



include dozens of cases where 
it's defended minority religious 
freedoms, which are much 
more needed when we see 
that almost half of Americans 
polled would submit Muslims 
to the kinds of identifica- 
tion requirements (as tattoos, 
armbands) the Nazis required 
of Jews. Don't take my word; 
check their Web site. As to the 
joke about wanting to "com- 
municate" with the ACLU, 
that's precisely what typically 
is lacking here - (there is) no 
dialogue at all, not even with 
K-Staters. 



As far as awarding this 
material large headlines and 
a big cartoon of a smirking 
Jesus, I suggest if the Collegian 
must be a training ground for 
tabloid sensationalists instead 
of journalists of integrity, at 
least get your controversies 
right (the legitimate issue of 
just how far church and state 
must be separated), check a 
few facts, and consider when 
you might be miseducating our 
community. 



PROFESSOR OF EM&LISH 



Confederate flag memorializes proud history 
of South; leaders served out of love for state 



Editor, 

1 am a Tennessean with 
Confederate ancestry writing 
in response to Zachary Eckels 
article about the Confederate 
flag Now, apart from the lack 
of understanding of Southern 
culture and heritage, Eckels 
also connects the Confederacy 
to the Nazis. Yet I wonder, 
has he ever learned about the 
leaders of the Confederacy? 

Lets start with Robert E. 
Lee. who displayed the most 
tactically brilliant field com- 
mand of the time. He also was 
offered command of the Union 
armies first and chose to lead 
the Confederate armies, not 
out of hatred toward blacks, 



but out of love for his state 
How about another great Con- 
federate, Stonewall Jackson, 
whom General Lee referred to 
as his "right arm"? 

This man held no hatred 
or revulsion toward slaves but 
was a strong, Christian man 
with tremendous battlefield 
skills and deep devotion 

The list goes on with 
honorable men who led and 
fought for the Confederacy, 
and for Eckels to compare 
them to those responsible for 
the Holocaust is of the utmost 
shame. 

How dare he besmirch 
the good name of these men 
and the flag for which they 
stood? Eckels knows noth- 



ing of Southern pride and the 
history from which we came. 
If he did, he would know we 
Southerners see the flag and 
think not of bigotry and rac- 
ism but of the great men who 
once marched under that flag. 

Yet because others are 
too closed-minded to see 
the pride of our history, we 
should accommodate them 
and renounce the flag under 
which our forebears marched? 
I will not. I will continue to 
hold fast to my heritage and 
the symbols thereof, regardless 
of what Eckels continues to 
write. 

Brandon Spotght 
SOPHOMORE rM FOOD SCIENCE 



Comic strip pushes limit in mocking student; 
motivation behind humor appears juvenile 



Editor, 

1 am very upset about the 
comic strip in the Collegian 
on Nov 29. jess Boatwright 
went too far when she wrote 
that. I don't care that it 
didn't say anything specifi- 
cally hurtful about the so- 
called "Scooter girl" 

The Collegian was rude, 
and I lost all my respect, 



ROYAL 
>URPL 



we've got the 



stone; 

you've gol 



what little 1 had left, when 
that was published 

What is Scooter girl hurt- 
ing? Why is she being made 
fun of? 

She's not doing anything 
different than gay people 
walking around holding 
hands, but you don't see 
comic strips mocking them. 

I don't know what the 
motivation was behind that 



comic strip, but it definitely 
did not stimulate humor. 
It's time for Collegian staff 
members to stop acting like 
they're in high school. 

Tlfo.nl B* hi 
JUNIOR IN MANAGEMENT 



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Compromise, flexibility 
alleviate season's stress 



By M*g»n Mo»r 
KANSAS SEATE COLLLGIAN 

When students head home 
for the holidays next week, 
many will experience a solid 
month of family togetherness. 

That can mean great com 
fort or great anxiety, depend- 
ing on the circumstances. 

Charlotte Shoup Olsen, K- 
Slate Research and Extension 
family systems specialist, said 
striving for the image of a pic- 
ture-perfect holiday is a large 
source of stress. 

Compromise and flexibility 
are key in keeping stress at 
bay, she said. 

"During the holidays es 
pecially, it's unlikely that ev- 
erything will go as planned." 
Olsen said in a release, "That, 
in itself, provides a teachable 
moment, as children model 
parents' behavior in smooth- 
ing the way for a pleasant 
family gathering" 

Rather than focusing on 
the tasks that need to be com- 
pleted, families can focus on 
enjoying one another's com- 
pany, 

"Time together is precious," 
Olsen said "Children grow 
quickly, and family structure 
evolves as parents and grand- 
parents age." 

If togetherness gets to be 
too much, though, people can 



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benefit from taking a few min- 
utes to be alone, which allevi- 
ates the buildup of stress. 

The onset of the holiday 
season also can be painful for 
those who have lost a loved 
one or find themselves alone 
When they feel isolated, peo- 
ple can seek support through 
friends, community groups or 
religious services. 

They also could volunteer 
their time by visiting a nurs- 
ing home resident during the 
holidays 

More than 50 percent of 
nursing home residents have 
no living close relative, which 
could be related to the esti- 
mate that 60 percent of nurs 
ing home residents have no 
visitors, according to a survey 
by the American Association 
of Retired People. 

For people who have lost a 
loved one, a good way to cope 
with sadness is to realize that 
it's normal to grieve and cry, 
according to a guide by the 
Mayo Clinic 

Homecare and Hospice of 
fers support sessions for those 
coping with grief Counselors 
provide support, tips and cop- 
ing skills. Anyone can attend 
one of the sessions, which will 
be 1 :30-3:30 p.m. today or 5 
6:30 p.m. Dec. 12. 

For more information, call 
(785) 537-0688. 






Donate plasma and earn 



To reduce stress during 

the holidays: 

■ Srar* the wort. Try a podudt mnl 
or eat out 
■Crt^tnMor&butdon 'twt 

them ft*. Be open to new activities 
and kleathjfo^ develop iito futu* 



■ Blended tarn**' Blend traditions, 
nctuding favorite menu items, by 
iwtttng everyone to partktoate, wen if 
it mil the way you might have done It 
previously. 

■ let go of some of the extras. If your 
mother or oflndmother used to irate 
sbt d rflc wi a kinds of pies, choose one or 
tm redpes — purnpt* or apple, far 
example — and go wtti it 

■ Give people the benefit of (he doubt 
If Uncle Jed fas to festotak pottto 
but ado wes to pay bond gams, 
suggest an earty game to help maintain 
the boiday mood- 
Source: Chaitotte Shoup Own, It-State 
RmmtcH and Extension famty symeiro 
pttft 

!f you're alone on the 
holidays: 

■ Get out and go somewhere. Rnd 
places to sornutate and amuse you. 
Mus*urm,ftstfvab or streets decorated 
tot the holidays might recharge you. 
■Take on a home project fh up that 
guestroom, do some ndoor planting or, 
weartaperniittino^dosornetCMCTHips 
outside your home. 

■ fiedtstovw an oM creative talent 
Have you been telling yourself you'd 
start painting agam or get back to the 
guitar? Now^ your chance. 

■ Treat yourself to a personal spa Read 
a myswy novel by the fireplace, Tate a 



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and ihoch wKttni; 



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Page 6 



SPORTS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Love him or hate him 



Huggins brings exposure, revenue, 
but needs time to implement changes 



That the thought has even arose 
that maybe we should start to 
question coach Bob Huggins this 
early in his K-State career 
is ridiculous. Claiming to 
know more about how 
to coach a basketball 
team than Huggins is like 
claiming to know more 
about foreign affairs than 
President George W. Bush. 

OK, so maybe that anal- 
ogy doesn't work, but you 
get the point 

Huggins has won 20 or more 
games 20 times in his 24 seasons 
as a coach. That's a lot of 20s. How 
many times has K-State won 20 
or more games since the 1988-89 
season? Twice. 

Forget that Huggins has brought 
an immeasurable amount of expo- 
sure and money to this program 
Forget he already pulled the best 
recruiting class in the nation for 
next season according to almost 
everyone. 

Let's focus on this year's team, 
because that's what people, includ- 
ing my colleague here, seem to be 
so concerned about. 

The Wildcats aren't off to a hot 
start. 

They are just 1-3 on the road. 
two of those losses being blow- 
outs at New Mexico and Califor- 
nia. Maybe a lot of fans would've 
preferred a loss like the one at 
Colorado State Saturday, an 84-83 
hcartbreaker that made me ques- 
tion if it was really former coach 
Jim Wooldridge on the sideline 
wearing a Huggins costume 

Wooldridge s teams were famous 
for not having what it took to win 
tough games on the road. 

That's what Huggins is trying to 
change. 

The increase in revenue and the 
recruiting are aspects upon which 
Huggins can have an immediate 
effect. And he has. Reforming the 
mentality of this squad, however, 
will take time 

It's amazing that people are 
questioning Huggins this early, 
immediately after watching football 
coach Ron Prince go through the 
exact same thing We just witnessed 
the patience it takes to watch the 
first season under a new coach Did 
we learn anything? 

At least the doubting of Prince 




was a bit more justified. He hadn't 
coached a game before arriving at 
K-State 

Huggins, on the other 
hand, has coached a game or 
two in his career. He arrived 
with a 567-199 career record. 

The man is a winner. He 
has proven that through 
years and years of hard 
work, but apparently seven 
games of struggles is enough 
to throw all that away. 
A lot of people are com- 
plaining about the Wildcats' lack 
of offense. I'll admit - it does seem 
the team has no plan on offense. 
Jt consists of four people stand- 
ing around the outside not setting 
screens and Jason Bennett or Luis 
Colon or whoever "posting up" 
inside and never getting the ball 
But here's the thing Huggins 
wants to get his team right de- 
fensively before worrying about 
offense Why? Because defensive 
consistency is far more important 
in tough leagues like the Big 12 
Conference 

If losing meaningless games in 
November is the price Huggins has 
to pay to get this team where he 
wants, he'll do it. He's sending a 
message to his players. 

He will get them where he 
wants them to be. 

There are still four months left. 
My suggestion; let's be patient and 
let the man work his magic. 



Hick Dunn is i senior In print journalism. 
Pieis* send comments to %porti*ipub.kiu. 
t4u. 



Team lacks consistency, chemistry 
under wrong style of leadership 



I go to the Peters Recreation 
Complex every once in a while and 
play pickup basketball games with a 
bunch of people I've never 
played with before. 

It's fun. We have a good 
time, but it's also extremely 
sloppy. The two teams 
have little to no chemis- 
try and have a hard time 
getting into any offensive 
rhythm. 

When I play with peo- 
ple I've played with before, 

we know how the others operate on 
the court, and thus, we have more 
consistency during the game 

The defense is better because ev- 
eryone has more of an understand- 
ing of where their teammates will 
be. The passes are more accurate 
because the players have a better 
idea of where teammates are on the 
court. The teams make more shots 
because the players know where the 
others should stand on offense to 
have the best chance to score 

Most people who know anything 
about basketball would agree that 
some of the best teams become 
great because they play together on 
a consistent basis. 

This brings me to the state of the 
K-State men's basketball team. 

K-State has a 4-3 record this 
season and has won only one of its 
four road games. One of the team's 
three road losses includes an 84-83 
loss last Saturday to Colorado State. 

The biggest problem with this 
team is consistency and chemistry, 
or lack thereof. The Wildcats have 
a hard time getting into an offensive 
rhythm and usually end up throwing 
the ball around the perimeter until 
the shot clock runs down. 

This leads to one of the players 
throwing up a contested three-point 
shot that is rebounded by the oppos- 
ing team because none of the Wild- 
cats are anywhere near the basket 

Huggins is not doing a good job 
coaching this team so far, and a 
perfect example of this was the Cop- 
pin State game on Nov. 25. Three 
minutes into the game, point 
guard Blake Young stole the 





ball and went down the court for 
a layup. He missed, and the Eagles 
grabbed the rebound because the 
other four Wildcat starters 
hadn't attempted to make it 
past halfcourt 

Huggins benched those 
four players due to a lack 
of effort, and the starters 
didn't play together again 
until there were about seven 
CEDRIQUE minutes left in the game. 
HEMMING Huggins is trying to make 

his players understand the 

amount of work involved in playing 
championship basketball, but the 
way he is doing it is wrong. 

He should have called b timeout, 
yelled at them and sent them back 
onto the floor together They could 
have played through their mistakes 
and continued to team how the oth- 
ers operate on the court 

The starting five will not become 
a better unit if they are always 
benched for poor play They have 
to be allowed to play through their 
mistakes and loam from them. Only 
then will this team begin to start 
showing signs of improvement 

Hopefully the addition of Bill 
Walker on Dec 17 will give this 
team another dimension offensively 

If Walker comes in and is as 
effective as K-State fans hope, 
Huggins is going to be known as a 
genius because of how quickly he 
turned this program around. 

But if Walker doesn't contribute 
like he's supposed to and K-State 
continues to struggle, the Big 12 
Conference season is going to be 
a long one this year, and everyone 
is going to begin questioning the 
coaching methods of Huggins. 
1 just thought I'd start a little 
earlier than everybody else. 



C*drt9u» Fttnmiftf ai MM print Jwmilisrn 
and budnttt, Hmw WH" nmmtnts to ipomw 




K-State faces Cleveland State after 3rd road loss 



Men's basket 

ball coach 

Bob Hugglm 

talks to senior 

forward Car tier 

Martin just 

before Martin 

returns to the 

game during 

the second 

half of the 

game against 

William & 

Mary Nov. 1 1 

at Bramlage 

Coliseum 

StavtnDotl 

COtLfOI** 




By Jonathan Carta n 

KANSAS STATt COLLEGIAN 

Bob Huggins probably is ready 
for the winter break. The extra time 
off from academics to focus on 
basketball could do his team some 
good 

K-State (4-3) has lost three of 
its last four games, with its last win 
coming against Coppin State, 68-S7, 
on Nov. 25. The Wildcats lost their 
last three road games by a com- 
bined score of 240-185 

"We just got to continue to work 
at being more consistent, and that's 
just top to bottom," Huggins said 
"I'm kind of looking forward to the 
break. I think we'll get better." 

While the Wildcats' road woes 
have been piling up, they have been 
3-0 at home. K-State will be back 
at Bramlage Coliseum at 7 tonight 
when it faces Cleveland State (5- 
4). 

Junior forward J'Nathan Bullock 
is the Vikings' leading scorer, aver- 
aging about 15 points a game 

Cleveland State has won four 



of its last five games, with the lone 
loss coming against No. 15 Butler, 
70-45, on Dec. 2. 

Part of the reason for K-State's 
slow start has been a lack of pro- 
duction from some of its veteran 
players. 

Junior forward David Hoskins, 
who was the Wildcats' second-lead- 
ing scorer last year, scored just six 
points in K-State's last two losses. 

"I think the thing to do is con- 
tinue starting Dave," Huggins said. 
"Whether that continues or not, 1 
don't know" 

K-State's leading scorer from 
last season, senior forward Cartier 
Martin, is once again the Wildcats' 
No, 1 offensive option, but he has 
missed in clutch situations. Martin 
scored a team-high 21 points dur- 
ing K-State's 84-83 loss to Colorado 
State last Saturday but missed two 
of three free throws with a second 
remaining in the game 

"We've asked him to do a whole 
lot more," Huggins said. "We've 
probably asked him to do more 
than he had in the put." 



Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2006 

1-MINUTE 
DRILL 

Staff Reports 




BKW | Wildcats open on road 
against Louisiana Tech tonight 

After breezing to a pair of easy wins 
in taking the Commerce Bank Wildcat 
Classic championship over the weekend, 
the K-State women's basketball team will 
play its first road game of the season at 7 
tonight. 

The Wildcats (6-1) will play Louisiana 
Tech (2-5) and try to extend its winning 
streak to four games. In its last meeting 
against the Lady Techsters — last season 
at Bramlage Coliseum — the Wildcats 
won 77 66. It was just the first win in 
seven tries against Louisiana Tech, a 
team that finished 26- S last season and 
advanced to the NCAA Tournament. 

But after losing two starters from 
last year's team, the Lady Techsters have 
stumbled out of the gate to open its 
season. However, they still present some 
problems for the Wildcats, as Ty Moore 
(13.1 points per game) and Shan Moore 
(13.0 ppg) — no relation — bring 
double-digit scoring averages into the 
contest. 

So far this season, the Wildcats 
have been paced by sophomore forward 
Marlies Gipson 

Gipson is averaging 1 3 9 points and 
B.9 rebounds per game, and has been 
equally impressive defensively. Gipson has 
collected IS blocks in seven games and 
has helped her team hold opponents to an 
average of just 33 points per game in the 
last three games. 

The Wildcats received eight votes in 
this week's Associated Press Top -25 poll. 

- Written by Jeffrey Rake 

Associated Press 




CBK | Rugters coach Schiano 
won't leave to coach Miami 

PISCATAWAY, N.J. -Rutgers coach 
Greg Schiano will stay with the school 
he led to national prominence this season, 
rather than pursue taking over the 
troubled Miami program. 

Schiano, Miami's defensive coordi- 
nator in 1999 and 2000, said he told 
Hurricanes athletic director Paul Dee on 
Monday that he was not a candidate to 
become their head coach. 

Miami coach Larry Coker was fired 
after going 6-6 in the regular season 

Schiano has orchestrated No. 16 
Rutgers' rise from one of the nation's 
lowliest programs in the past six seasons. 
At 10-2 (5-2 Big fast), the Scarlet Knights 
are heading to a Texas Bowl match-up 
against K-State. 

Rutgers narrowly missed the Bowl 
Championship Series by losing Saturday 
night in triple overtime at West Virginia. 

Last year, Schiano led Rutgers to its 
first winning season (7-5) since 1992 and 
its first bowl berth since 1978. 



CBK | Stanford coach Hams fired 
after e>1 7 record in last 2 years 

STANFORD, Calif — Walt Harris was 
fired Monday as Stanford's football coach 
two days after finishing the worst season in 
more than four decades at the school. 

Walt Harris' 6- 17 record led Stanford to 
dismiss the coach two years into a five-year 
contract. 

Athletic director Bob Bowlsby 
announced the decision after a morning 
meeting with Harris. The Cardinals (1 -1 1 ) 
finished their season with a 26-1 7 loss to 
rival California in the Big Gam* on Saturday 

Harris had a 6- 1 7 record in the first two 
years of his five-year contract. Bowlsby said 
he'd like to have a search for a new coach 
completed In two weeks. 



fi 



Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2006 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page? 




SUvan Dell | fOUFGUN 
Megan Kla$sen, Michelle Pomcroy and Kara Wab«r. all residents of Hesstcm, Kan., cheer during Ktlth 
Anderson's performance at Country Stampede on June 22 at Tuttle Creek State Park, 

Country Stampede releases 
line-up; Adkins to headline 



By Megan Moser 

KANSAS SIMKOlLtUAS 

Organizers announced (he 
line-up for the 12th annual 

Affiliated Foods Midwest 
Country Stampede, a summer 
country musk series in Man 
hattan. 

Trace Adkins will headline 
the opening day line-up at 



9:30 p.m. June 21, 2007 Alan 
lacksun. Gary Allan and the 
music duo Big & Rich also 
will headline the event. 

Other performers will in- 
clude Sawyer Brown, Phil 
Vassar. Neal McCoy, Rodney 
Atkins, Blain Younger, Shevy 
Smith, and the groups Little 
Big Town and Cross Cana- 
dian Ragweed. 



The country music event 
will be )une 21 -24, 2007, in 
Tuttle Creek State Park 

Tickets went on sale Sat- 
urday. Those who purchase 
tickets before Jan. 19 will get 
in 30 minutes before the gates 
officially open. 

For more information, go 
to www.countrystampede. 
com 



Web site links recyclers 
for trade of used items 



By Eric Davit 

KANSAS SIMI COLLEGIAN 

The saying "One man's 
trash is another man's trea 
sure" has been given new 
meaning thanks* to Freecycle. 
org, a recycling Web site. 

If a person has something 
that won't be destroyed in a 
landfill or that others could 
use. the item can be posted 
on a local Freecycle Web 
page It is free to join 

Need a wheelbarrow? 
Simply type it into a search 
engine, and the site will return 
all of the wheelbarrows listed 
within a 100-mile radius. The 
main database on Freecycle's 
Web site can be searched for 
nationwide results. 

People can start their own 
local groups If an area does 
not contain a population that 
can support a group, that 
group might be combined 
with a group from a nearby 
city. 



There are more than 40 
Freecycle groups in Kansas, 
but none in Riley County 

Since its May 2003. be 
ginning in Tucson, Ariz., the 
program has become popu- 
lar in slates like in Michigan 
and Illinois; both states have 
more than 100 groups How- 
ever, the idea has yet to catch 
on in other states like Ken- 
tucky, where there is only one 
group. 

Globally, there are more 
than 3,800 groups and 
2,800,000 members 

Annie Baker, a Freecycle 
moderator in function City, 
said college students can ben- 
efit from the program. 

"Most times when a stu- 
dent is moving, there are 
some things that the student 
cannot move and is forced to 
throw away," she said. 

"That is where they can 
use Freecycle. All they need 
to do is post what they have 
on the site, pick who they 



want to give their item to, and 
then arrange a pickup time" 

As a moderator, Baker said 
her duties include overseeing 
exchanges and ensuring her 
local site is running well. 

According to the Freecycle 
Web site, Deron Beal. who 
was working for a non-profit 
company at the time, devel- 
oped the idea to establish an 
e-mail network of items be- 
ing thrown away that people 
could use. 

He and 30 friends started 
the recycling service, which 
operates in more than SO 
countries. Volunteers run 
each of the local sites for the 
non-profit organization. 

Becky Bennie, junior in el- 
ementary education, said she 
would use the site if she knew 
more about it. 

"I would give stuff away in 
hope that the favor would be 
returned if I moved to a new 
city where I needed some- 
thing," she said 



we've got the stories you've got to read. 



Campus Phone Books ^ 8 " K ™, 



Get your Royal Purple yearbook 
in Kedzie 103, or call 532-6555. 



1 1| know 

how 



L 



% i i 




January 2007 

December 27, 2006 - January 10, 2007 



■ 



i ft i 



have 



We tan get 
that lor 



r TrVl 



Checkout' 
MENU GUIDE 
in bod of the 
Campus Phone Book 

fcriliHi hi Keslile 103 
Mofi. - Frl. t o.m. ■ 5 p.m. 




Time is running out. Enroll today I To enroll and/or obtain an Intercession schedule with complete course descriptions and 
prerequisites, visit http://vwwdce.ksu.edu7 If you prefer, call (785) 532-5566 or 1-800-432-8222 or visit the Division of Continuing 
Education at 131 College Court Building, 161 5 Anderson Ave ., Manhattan, KS. 

Tuition for on-campus couraework will be $164 per undergraduate resident credit hour and $227 percraduete resident credit hour, 
plus $1 per day special and health fees A student services fee and/or materials fees may be requires for some courses a $14 per 
credit hour fee is assessed for Engineenng and Architecture courses K. 



Course Title 

Agriculture 

Pradieum m Bakery Technology 

Architecture, Planning, i> Design 

Top-let in Architectural Design Methods: 

The Expressive Line 
LEED for Professional Accreditation 
Beginning Airbrush 
Portfolio Design Studio 
Portfolio Design Studio 
Design Graphics and Visual Thinking 
Problems/Advanced Design Graphics/Visual Thinking 
Computer Appscabons in Planning and Design 

Arts 1 Sciences J. 

Understanding Islam ^^ 

Forensic Medicine and the Investigation of Death 

The History of the American Intelligence Community 

Sport and Exercise Personality 

Jazz in Kansas City and the Southwest 

From Metropolis to (he Heartland Immigrant 

Experiences in America 
Social Constructor of Serial Murder 

Ethics in Drama Therapy 
Topics in Technical Theatre Scene Painting 
Women and Environment a lism The Ecotemirwst 
Perspective 

Business 

introduction to Total Quality Management 



Achieving Career Success 

Education 

Stress Management 

Stress Management for Teacriers, Counsel 

and Administrators 
Early Field Experience 



Engineering 

CAD m Engineering and Construction 
Introduction to LEED 
Introduction to Information Technology 
introduction to Microcomputer Spreadsheet 

Applications 
Introduction to Microcomputer Database Applications 
Topics in Construction Management: Tilt-Up Concrete 

Structures n Construction Msngt 
Introduction to Total Quality Management 

Problems'Eng and Tech Hajwoper Training 

Human Ecology 

Understanding Death, Dying. Grief and Loss 
Introduction to Marriage and Family Therapy 
Topics Premarital Education and Counseling 
Seminar in Long-Term Core Administration 




Course # 



QRSC 701 



ARCH 710 
ARCH 715 
IAPD408 
IAPD406 
IAPD830 
LAP 310 
LAR741 
PLAN 630 



AMETH 560 
ANTH 664 
HIST 200 
KIN 592 
MUSIC 424 

SOCIO 500 
SOCIO 562 

THTRE630 
THTRE 711 



Reff Credit 





MANGT 300 
MANGT 497 

EDCEP 502 

EDCEP 802 
FDSEC 230 



ARE 311 
ARE 720 
CIS 101 

CIS 102 
CIS 103 

CNS644 
DEN 300 

DEM MB 



FSHS300 
FSHS 704 
FSHS708 
GERON 610 



94100 



94107 
94106 
94136 
94137 
94139 
94109 
94110 
94150 



94105 
94103 

94117 
94123 
94124 

94125 
94126 

9412B 

94130 



94157 
94140 

94163 

94162 
94160 



94165 
94111 
94146 

94147 
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9414S 

94184 

94166 



94167 
94171 
94172 

94180 



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WOMSTS00 94134 3 UG/G 



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12/27-1/10 
12/27-1/10 
12/27-1/1C 
1/3-1/10 



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12/27-1/10 

12/27-1/9 

12/27-1/10 

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12/27-1/10 



12/27-1/10 
12/27-1/10 

12/27-1/10 



1/5-1/6 
12/27-1/10 

12/27-1/10 

12/27-1/10 
12/27-1/lfl 



12/27-1/10 
1/3-t/10 

12/27-12/29 

1/2-1/4 
1/B-1/10 

1/2-1/10 
1/5-1/B 

1/2-1/30 



12/27-1/10 
12/27-1/10 
12/27-1/10 
12/26-1/10 



www.dce.ksu.edu/intersession 



Times 



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f 



Page8 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2006 



Prison dog-training program aids 
community, Ellsworth inmates 



BySh.tUEIlit 

KANWMTEOXISGIAN 

The empty nest syndrome a 
mother feels when her children 
leave home is the same way Jer- 
emy Shane, inmate at Ellsworth 
Correctional Facility, and many 
other inmates feel about their 
dogs. 

Ellsworth Correctional Fa- 
cility inmates are involved in 
a prison dog program in con- 
junction with the non-profit 
organization Canine Assis- 
tance Rehabilitation Education 
and Services. The partnership, 
which has been strong for eight 
years, trains dogs that are af- 
fordable and available to people 
with special needs There are 14 
inmates who are currently train 
Lng dogs 

After the dogs are trained, 
the inmate, the dog and the 
person who will receive the dog 
meet at a graduation ceremony. 

"It is hard sometimes to let 
the dogs go after you've spent 
so much time with them and 
worked so hard to train them, 
then they just leave," Shane 
said. 

The dog lives with the in- 
mates in their cell, said Robert 
Speer, head of the prison dog 
program at Ellsworth. 

"The inmates have the time 
to spend to bond and teach 
them. Most professional train- 
ers are trying to train 20 dogs at 
the same time," Speer said 

Sarah Holbert, chief execu- 
tive officer of CARES, said the 
dogs are a bargain for recipi- 
ents, and they benefit the com- 
munity. 

When the people in need 
receive dogs, they pay a $500 
reimbursement lee that funds 
everything that goes with the 
dog. including specialized 
equipment, a microchip to help 



locate the dog and a specialized 
harness, Holbert said 

"These types of dogs arc be- 
ing sold for more than $20,000 
per dog," she said. 

After the dogs arc trained 
and the inmates give the dogs 
away in the graduation cer- 
emony, CARES customizes the 
dog to the individual recipient's 
particular need, Holbert said 

CARES trains dogs to assist 
people who are handicapped, 
have developmental, hearing 
or emotional problems, seizures 
or diabetes health issues. 

The staff and inmates at Ells 
worth are terrific to work with, 
and they make the program run 
smoothly, Holbert said. 

Shane said the program 
helps decrease violence in the 
facility. 

"It's easy to get in trouble in 
here, and this program helps 
me stay out of trouble, because 
I don't want to lose my dog," he 
said 

lb participate, prisoners 
have to have good behavior, fol- 
low all of the prison rules, and 
be willing to work with the dog 
24 hours a day, seven days a 
week, Speer said 

"For most of these inmates, 
this is the first lime that they are 
doing something positive and 
something the inmates and their 
families can be proud about," he 
said. 

The program has been prov- 
en to be beneficial to both the 
prison inmates and the facility 
staff, Speer said The dogs' pres- 
ence makes staff and inmates 
happier and more talkative 

"When the staff and inmates 
are smiling, that is a big plus. It 
makes life a little more humane 
and teaches the inmates how to 
care without hurting," he said 

The inmates take pride in 
training these dogs. Speer said. 



because most prison jobs are 
not something in which some- 
one would take much pride 

"Unless you spend time here, 
it would be hard lo understand 
how bored or starved for some- 
thing realihese people are." he 
said. 

Through this program, the 
inmates have done a lot to give 
back to the community, not 
only in the United States, but 
internationally 

Montana, a chocolate lab, 
was trained by prisoners at Ells- 
worth and sent to Peru to help 
a 400-person orphanage, Speer 
said. 

"In Peru, most of the dogs 
are untrained, wild and could 
hurt you It was very unusual 
for them to have Montana," 
Speer said 

CARES members visit the 
prison and teach inmates the 
basics of training a service dog. 
Some inmates are advanced 
enough that they are allowed to 
teach their peers on their own. 

Not only docs the prison dog 
program ease possible hostili- 
ties between inmates and staff, 
but also it improves the prison- 
ers' mental and physical health. 

Shane said his quality of 
life in the facility has unproved 
since he started this program 

"It has given me a comfort 
zone," he said "1 have been in 
different institutions that did 
nut have this, and it helps me 
pass the time and be happy, be- 
cause when the dog is happy, so 
ami." 

Dana Britton, associate pro- 
fessor in sociology, said depres- 
sion is linked to physical health. 
The prison dog program forces 
people to be active. 

Britton said 99 percent of in- 
mates are going to leave prison 
and the prison dog program 
helps mold them into better 




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members of society when they 
get out 

"This program gives the in- 
mates a chance to be molded 
into the people that you want to 
live next door to," Britton said 

Although the program has 
been proven to be beneficial to 
the inmates and staff, there are 
a few negative effects the pro- 
gram could have. 

When the inmates have the 
dogs, they stand out and are 
more likely to be isolated from 
the other inmates. 

"One negative is that the in- 
mates can't hide in-crowd. Ev- 
eryone is looking at you," Speer 
said. 

It also is a big responsibility 
for the inmates They must pick 
up after the dog and wash the 
dog, and they are confined to a 
small cell with a dog and other 
inmates. 

Warden Sam Cline said the 
facility he came from did not of- 
fer a canine program. 

The dogs* presence is reliev- 
ing in a jail environment, Cline 
said. 

"These animals give the in- 
mates an outlet of affection that 
they that hadn't had before," he 
said 

The next class of dogs to be 
distributed to people through 
CARES will have almost 650 
dugs. 

Holbert said CARES, a non 
profit organization, sometimes 
struggles to make ends meet 

"We do fundraising to pay 
for food and medical equipment 
for the inmates and people in 
need," Holbert said 

She said people are now 
donating to help national crisis 
victims and not funding as local 
organizations as much How- 
ever, CARES still finds a way to 
keep providing the dogs to the 
community. 



FRATERNITY | Ceremony 
cleanses area for MLK Jr. bust 



Continued from Page 1 

ancestor worship," said Der- 
on Davis, member of Alpha 
Phi Alpha fraternity and non- 
degree student in biology. 
"On this day, our centennial, 
we are inviting our ancestors, 
our founders, to be with us" 

The ceremony started as 
fraternity members made a 
circle around the hallowed 
ground. The members all 
were dressed in black suits 
with gold ties to honor their 
fraternity colors. The chap- 
lain recited a prayer, and the 
ceremony began. 

"We are here to honor you 
and to show that your legacy 
is alive and well," said Da- 
vis, who led the libation cer- 
emony. "We pour libation to 
you." 

After three minutes of 
silence, the university belts 
played the Alpha Phi Alpha 
fraternity hymn. After the 
hymn closed, members re- 
peated the hymn in song. 

Water was poured on the 
site of the bust to ritually 
cleanse the area. Davis said 
the ceremony was in honor 



not only of past Alphas, but 
also of all ancestors of the Af- 
rican-American community. 

"This not only encom- 
passes Alpha," Davis said. 
"This encompasses the entire 
African-American struggle 
in the diaspora As we come 
to this moment, we remem- 
ber Alpha was a benchmark 
in recognizing the achieve- 
ments of the African -Ameri- 
can community." 

The day of celebration for 
Alpha Phi Alpha did not end 
with the libation ceremony. 
The members performed 
a step show in the K- State 
Student Union, followed by 
a visit to the Boys and Girls 
Clubs of Manhattan, one of 
the Alphas' philanthropic en- 
deavors. 

"I'm so honored, and I feel 
lucky lo be alive on this day 
to celebrate 100 years of Al- 
pha." said Abdul Yahaya, ju- 
nior in civil engineering and 
fraternity president. "Having 
the opportunity to be with 
my brothers on this historic 
day is amazing, and I have 
this opportunity thanks to K- 
State" 



Roommates? 

Find a subleaser by advertising 
in the classifieds. 
Call 532-6555. 




Sell Your Textbooks 

7 CASH! 





at 

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Textbook Department 

Buy Back Hours: 

Mori, Dec 1 1 th - Fri, Dec 1 5th 
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Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2006 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 9 







I I I I ii 



: L 1 ■ J : : ■ J J . ■ ■ ! 




tmpluyttirnt Ca r e t Ii 



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looking for a job? 

CHECK THE 

COLLEGIAN 

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Bulletin Board 




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Flying Club has five air- 
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Call 785-776-1744, www ■ 

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race, sen, familial status, 
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Violations should be re- 
ported to the Director ot 
Human Resources at City 
Hall. {715)587-2440. 




L322SS1J 




MANHATTAN CITY Ordl 
nance 4814 assures ev- 
ery person equal opportu- 
nity In hou sing without dl s- 
tlnctlon on account ol 
race, sen, familial statu a. 
military status, disability, 
religion, age. color, na- 
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Violations should be re- 
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785-313-7473. 
ONE-BEDROOM, ONE 
block from campus $600. 
utilities paid Cat 
786-537-4047 

C^E-KofloOM. THREE- 
BEDROOM, and studio 
Three blocks from cam- 
pus Available January 1 
785-776-6055 

Sftjolo Ik duple*, appll- 
snoes. washer/ dryer 
Screened porch No pets 
Water and trash included 
MM, 765-537-8420 

785-341-5346 

TWO-BEDROOM AVAII 
ABIE lor January to Au- 
gust. Pets ok Dish- 
washer $575/ month Cat 
785-341-2940 or 

785-537 0205. 



Rent-Housa 



AVAILABLE SOON Two- 
bedroom mam floor of du- 
ple* Washer/ dryer Si* 
month lease. One block 
east of Aggieville 
785-539-3672. 

NICE " THREE BED- 
ROOM. one bath avail- 
able January 1st. No pets 
$880/ month Yard, 
garage, close to campus 
Lots ol storage. 

765-537-7354 

THREE. FOUR. FIVE, SIX 
PLUS BEDROOMS Look 
log for that perfect home 
to rent' Greal selection 
and prices Capstone 
Management 
785-341-0686 
THReE-BEDROOM du- 
plei. northwest ol sta- 
dium No smoking, drink- 
ing, or pets 785-539-1 554 

THREE BEDROOM 
HOUSE, one block Irom 
campus Washer/ dryer, 
dishwasher, central air 
Available January 1 $295 
per bedroom 

765-336-1022 

THREE- SEVEN BED 
ROOM houses near cam- 
pus for next yssr June/ 
August teases all have 
central air, lull kitchens, 
and washer/ dryer Call 
now for beet selection. 

785- 341-1897. 

TWO-BEDROOM 
HOUSE Available Jan- 
uary 1. 2007. Close to 
campus No pets Call 
785-539-1975 or 

7 BS-31 3-4465. 



FEMALE 

wanted for three -bedroom 
house $300. utilities paid 
Call 785-537-4947 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted to share large 
apartment. Two miles 
from campus. Available 
mid-December No Smok- 
ing/ pets $305 plus one- 
half unities Call 
402-525-7947. 

FEMALE ROOMMATffS) 
non-smoking, to break, 
train, show horses, etc. 
for rent- Prefer veterinar- 
ian, animal science ma- 
jors. PO Bo* 1211. Man- 
hattan, KS 66505 

RESPONSIBLE ROOM 
MATE wanted Ouiet 
neighborhood two miles 
from campus- Washer/ 
dryer. No pets. $275/ 
month plus one-lortti uWI- 
•les. Kelly 785-565-9136 

ROOMMATE NEEDED 
$325 per month, plus utili- 
ties. Across street from 
campus, off-street park 
Ing. Available January 
2007- August 2007. 
763-439-6926. 

ROOMMATE WANTED 
for a two-bedroom house 
All appliances supplied 
Call 785-332-6152 ask lor 
Erica 

ROOMMATE WANTED 
lor Spring Semester. Nice 
house, close to campus 
Pets welcome 
620-362-7241 

SUBLET APARTMENT lo 
August. University Cross- 
ing. Non -drinker, great 
roommate, as soon as 
possible. 913-709-8434. 




TWO-BEDROOM ONE 
bath $275 each, plus utili- 
ties. One block Irom cam- 
pus Need two spring sub- 
leasers Call 
620-674-5900 ask lor 
Bryan Armendarti. 



FEMALE 
wanted. 
Big live 
includes 
olf-streel 
tul place, 
mates 
316-210-! 



ROOMMATE 
January - July, 
bedroom duple* 
all appliances, 
parking, Beautl- 
wonderiul room- 
Call Courtney 
5975 




A MALE roomma* 
i lustier! to share three- 
bedroom house One 
block from campus. 
Washer/ dryer. $296 par 
month Available now 
through May, 

765-336-1124. 

ffjvIale rAommai™ 

needed lor lour-bedroom 
house $350/ month plus 
electricity, gaa. SBC. 
Quiet, nice house. ma|or 



FEMALE SUBLEASER 
lour-bedroom. 2 bath 
house. $300/ month- ne- 
gotiable. January- May. 
washer/ dryer, patio, walk- 

s*j rMartM •ewtahed 

available 765-313 5229 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 
needed lor January 07 
through May Three-Bed- 
room house Nice, new, 
with washer and dryer 
Rent $250 plus utilities. 
Call 765 221 -2292 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 
needed tor one-bedroom 
for spring semester 
Would be living with two 
females Close to Ag- 
gieville and campus 
9 1 3-449-2473 

f?mali! — mm 

needed lor second 
semester Four -bedroom 
house, washer/ dryer, 
dishwasher included 

Close to campus and Ag- 
gieville 620-271-2956 

MALE SUBLEASER 
needed Spring 2007. 
dose to campus $300 
pet month plus one-half 
utilities Please call Bran- 
don Bayless 
785-230-0612. 

MALE SUBLEASER 

wanted. Close to campus, 
washer and dryer, four- 
bedroom, rent $370 
Needed by January 
785 282-08W 



ONE-BEOROOM SUB- 
LEASE Rent reduced. 
Pels allowed Available 
December 20. 

31 6-61 7-S682. 

ONE-BEDROOM 1 WlTH a 
full bath available in a two- 
bedroom apartment Fur- 
rushed, cable No pets 
Washer/ dryer. Only $375/ 
month Immediately l 

785-317-6313 

QUIET ONEBEDROOM 
across from campus $500 
a month Water, gas. and 
trash paid Available in 
January 785-317-2186. 

ROOMMATES WANTED 
for two-bedrooms, avail- 
able for spring seme si er 
Low rent, close to cam- 
pus One- fifth utilities, 
washer/ dryer. 
913-206-5269. 

SUBLEASER NEEDED 
tor a sin-bedroom house. 
Close to campus $260 a 
month plua one-sixth ol 
utilities. January through 
May 913-709-2246. 

SUBLEASER tfltfb 
January i . One-bedroom 
apartment Close to Ag- 
gieville and campus Rent 
$450/ month. Carl 
913-909-2117. 

SUBLEASER WANTED 
as soon as possible. Nice 
house close to campus 
$350/ month (willing lo 
deal) + one-fifth utilities. 
Can Brandi at 

785-446-0239 ot email: 
bbuzzard 0kau.edu . 

SUBLEASER WANTED 
tar Catholic women's 
house. Two blocks from 
campus. $310/ month In- 
cludes: utilities, food, rent, 
Live m dorms? May work 
deal' Call 785-366-6342. 

SUBLEASER WANTED 
One-bedroom one balh In 
two-bedroom two bath 
apartment $360 per 
month, furnished. Avail- 
able January 1 , 
785-479-1235 or tl- 
s3355(9 ksu.edu 

SuMASE'ft WANTED to 
share two-bedroom 

house. Clean, quiet neigh- 
borhood Washer/ dryer, 
off street parking $400/ 
month, utilities included. 
913-656-1411 

SUBLEASER WANTED. 
Close to campus washer/ 
dryer Included. $285/ 
month one-fourth utilities. 
Pels ok. CaH 

785-275-1913, 

SUBLEASER WANTED 
Located across from Ag- 
gieville and campus Avail- 
able January 2007 lo Au- 
gust. Rent negotiable 
Call Chris at 

785-527-3259. 

SUBLEASERS NEEDED 
for January. Two-bed- 
room apartment close to 
Aggieville and campus. 
$400 plus utilities Call 
816-668-9223 or 

913-709-8615, 



SUBLEASERS NEEDED 
for two-bedrooms In a 
lour-bedroom house. 

$325 a month, 

620-336-3675. 

THREE ROOMS available 
lor sublease In three-bed- 
room, one bath tor Spring 
semester. One btocK from 
Aggieville S17 Mora 
$330/ month. 

785-317-1263 

TWO fTIJaLe Sub- 
leasers needed tor su- 
bedroom house. All bills 
included In rent. $329 per 
month Call Lindaey 
820 242-8451. 

TWO BEDROOMS AVAIL- 
ABLE in nice lout-oed- 
room apartment Big 
screen, bar, deck, $250/ 
month, fun atmosphere 
January 1 . CaH 

913-909-2278, 



76S-SB7-S207, 

765-230-3008 



ADVERTISE. 



I 



THE COLLEGIAN cannot 
verify the financial poten- 
tial of advertisements In 
the EmptoymenUCareer 
classification. Readers 
are advised to approach 
any such business oppor- 
tunity with rea- 
sonable cau- 
tion. The Collegian urges 
our fe e ders lo contact the 
Better Business Bureau. 
S01 SE Jefferson, 
Tooeka, KS 86607.11 M. 
,785)232-0454 

4 OLIVES Wtne Bar now 
hiring lunch cooks. Ftam- 
ble hours, competitive 
pay. Apply In person 3033 
Anderson Avenue 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSlS- 
TANT Join our profes- 
sional team as we intro- 
duce CtvicPlut E -Govern- 
ment Innovations to Cities 
and Countries across the 
US This challenging posi- 
tion requires the ability to 
handle multiple tasks and 
priorities whUa maintain- 
ing a positive and ener- 
getic attitude $12/ hour. 
Full-time only, opportuni- 
ties tor advancement. E- 
mait resume m Microsoft 
Word or Text formal to: 
lObstS civicpkj s com 

BARTENDING* $300 a 
day potential. No experi- 
ence necessary Training 
provided Call 

1-80O-965-6520 sxt 144 

COOK NEEDED at Wesly 
Community Care Home 
Competitive wage, flexible 
scheduling Contact 
Nancy, Highway 99 and 
Main Westmoreland 
785-457-2801 

CREATIVE DIRECTOR 
CivicPIus IS the nations 
leading provider ol City. 
County, and School web- 
sites This Is a full-time, 
Manhattan based posi- 
tion. You will ob m charge 
of directing the creative 
process. Including brain- 
storming with staff, meet- 
ing with customers and 
providing the creative vi- 
sion necessary to give our 
customers outstanding 
and award winning web- 
sites Salary commensu- 
rate with experience. Ben- 
efits Include health, den- 
tal, paid holidays, paid va- 
cation and 40 1K match- 
ing. Email resume in Mi- 
crosoft Word or te*t tor- 
mat to )0bs@CIVICplU5 

com. include cover letter 
explaining your capabili- 
ties 

EARN $2500+ monthly 
and more to type simple 
ads online www.dslaen- 
Irytypers com 

EARN $800 $3200 a 
month to drive brand new 
cars with ads placed on 
them. www. AdDrive Team - 
com. 

FIRST MANAGEMENT 
has a part-time leasing 
agent position available 
for a busy apartment com- 
munity Qualified appli- 
cants must have reliable 
transportation, a willing- 
ness to work a varied 
schedule It is required to 
be able to work full time 
Irom July 23rd through Au- 
gust 6th tor apartment 
turnover. Please apply at 
our Chase Manhattan 
Apartment location. 1409 
Chase Place, (comer ol 
College and Claflin ) No 
phone calls please Equal 
Opportunity Employer 

GRAPHIC DESIGNER 
CivicPIus is the nations 
leading provider ol city, 
county and school web- 
sites. Both full-time and 
work-at-homa (contrad) 
positions are available 
Full-time benefits Include 
health, dental, paid holi- 
days, paid vacation and 
401 (k) matching. Email 
resume and design sam- 
ples to jobs <9civicplus com 

HARRYS DAYTIME 

DISHWASHER NEEDED. 
Shifts 10am - 3pm on 
Mon-Wed-Fn and/ or 
Tues-Thurs Some night 
and/ or weekend availabil- 
ity. Apply In person at 416 
Poynta Ave Good Pay. 

KANSAS WHEAT is seek 
ing a part-time Records In- 
tern. Requires knowledge 
ol Microsoft Access. Ex- 
cellent resume builder! 
Send resume to dpeler- 
soniefkswhettcom or 

Kansas Wheat, 217 South- 
wind Place, Manhattan. 
KS 66503. by December 
11, 2006. Equal Opportu- 
nity Employer. 

MYSTERY SHOPPERS, 
Earn up to $150 Experi- 
ence not required Under- 
cover shoppers needed to 
ludge retail and dining es- 
tablishments Call 
600-722-4791. 

NcTWoAK TECHNICIAN 

Due lo our recent expan- 
sion. Networks Plua has a 
new opening tor a full- 
time Computer Network 
Technician in Manhattan 
Positive attitude, profes- 
sionalism, strong work 
eihic and one or more 
years of computer support 
experience or equivalent 
training la required. E-mail 
resume to (ob« O network - 
sphiscom in Microsoft 
Word or Text formal 
Equal Opportunity Em- 
ployer 



PART-TIME Furniture De- 
livery Positions: Rexfcie 
work schedule, great pay. 
Stop by A Ful House. 601 
S. 5th Street, 

785-537-9088 

PART TIME PERSONAL 
care attendant needed tor 
a 19 year old female. 
Wishing to attend Kansas 
State this January Duties 
would Include assisting 
dressing in the morning 
and evenings, it Inter- 
ested can 620-375-2200. 

PROGRAMMER ClVlC- 
PLUS Is the nations lead- 
ing provider ol city, county 
and school websites Furl 

- ome position In Manhat- 
tan, Microsoft ASP or 
SOL experience required 
$14 50/ hour plus health. 
dental, paid holidays, paid 
vacation and 40i(k) 
matching. Email resume 
in Microsoft Word or text 
tormai to jobsiftcMcplus - 
com. 

SALES ASSOCIATE Pro- 
vide customer service In 
the Art/ Technology de- 
partment Price and stock 
merchandise, ability to Ml 
40 tos., climb ladders and 
Operate cutbng equip- 
ment Position win also 
provide sales and service 
of cell phone plans and 
computers/ software Pral- 
erenca will be given to 
candidate s with back- 
ground ot experience In 
ert techniques/ supplies 
architecture or engineer- 
ing Hours: Saturday 2p m- 
8pm and Sunday 11am- 

- 5p.m. Pick up applica- 
tion at Vameys Book 
Store 

SO LONG SALOON Now 
hiring waitresses and bar- 
tenders. Apply In person. 
1130 Moro. Manhattan. 
KS 

STUDENT OFFICE Assis- 
tant needed in a fast- 
paced, dften high traffic 
business office Must 
have good working knowl- 
edge of Word and Excel 
Must be a self -motivated, 
quick learner with a good 
attention to details and 
proofreading. Previous of- 
fice experience highly pre- 
ferred. Apply in Kedzm 
103 and Include spring 
2007 schedule 



Reach 

more 
readers 



www. kstatecol Ic9ian.com 

Ads scheduled to be prtnitd Mi the CoHegJon tar 
be publrshid onilnt lor an ado-norul < 



Plao 

Get more bang for your I 



Deadlines 



G*ssif»ed ads must be 
placed 6y noon the day 

before you want your ad 

to run. Qassified display 

ads must be placed by 

-3 p.m. two worittno days 

prior to the date you 
want your ad to run. 

0U1 785-532-6555 




TELEPHONY TECHNI- 
CIAN The Phone Connec- 
tion is a fast growing 
voice networking (VOIP) 
company In need ol Tele- 
phony Technicians in 
SaHna, Manhattan, 

TopeKa and Kansas City. 
Positive attitude, profes- 
sionalism, strong work 
ethic and one or more 
years of telephone or com- 
puter network support ex- 
perience or equivalent 
training is required. Bene- 
fits Include Health, Dental, 
Paid Holidays, Paid Vaca- 
tion, Paid Training and 401- 
(k) matching. Email re- 
sume to vjbs@tpcxs.com 
in Microsoft Word or Texl 
format. 

WEB DESIGNER. Award 
winning advertising 

agency. Imagemakara. 
seeks luH-vme web devel- 
oper/ web designer Some 
training provided. Apply al 
www.wamegowork.com. 




Open Market 



FUTON FRAME- Do you 
have a good futon frame 
you need to get rid of? 
Give me a can, I mighl 
lust buy it. 765-556-0652 




1900 CHEVY Blazer. 
LOTS of recent work, runs 
great! ft 500 or Best Otter 
78S22O-t620 

FOB SALE Ford Taurus 
2004, excellent condition 
Asking price S7.500 or 
best offer. 785-313-6366 

RETIRING FACULTY sell- 
ing low mileage Mitsubishi 
2000 Mirage excellent 
condition 38.800 miles 
Manual, air-oonditloner 
stereo, $4200 

786-532-7176 office. 

785776-9505 Home 

7morsoc9ksu.edu 









Over 850 rentals in Die Manhattan S Junction City area 




/McCuilough 
Development 

mdiproperties.com ■ 785.776.3804 



fl SPRING Break Web 
altal Low Prices Guaran- 
teed. Group discounts tor 
6* Booh 20 people, get 3 
tree trips 1 www. Spring - 
Breakdiscounts com or 
800-836-8202 

DON! MISS oull Sprtog 
Break 2007 Is approach- 
ing and STS is ottering 
specials to this year's 
hottest desttosttonsl Cat 
tor savings 

1-800-648-4849 or visit 
wwwststrave1.com 
* 

I 
I 



suldolku 



Fill in the grid so that every row, 

every column, and every 3x3 box 

contains the digits 1 through 9 

with no repeats. 






7 3 



6 



8 



5 4 6 
1 9 



7 
1 



2 3 
6 5 4 



2 8 



Solution and tips 
at www.sudoku.com 



$ 2 0FF 

any regular or large sub 




Classified Rates 



10AY 

20 words of less 

$1050 

each word over 20 

20< pec word 

2 DAYS 

20 words or less. 
(1295 

each word over 20 
25< per word 

3 DAYS 

20 words or less 

,15.65 

each word over 20 

30| per word 

4 DAYS 

20 words or less 
" 117:90 

each word over 20 
35( pet word 

5 DAYS 

20 words or less 

(20.00 

each word over 20 

40{ per word 

(consecutive day rate) 



To Place An Ad 



Go to Kedzie 103 (across 
from the K-State 

Student Union,) Office 
hours are Monday 

through Friday from 
8a.fn.toSp.tn, 



How To Pay 



All classifieds must be 
paid in advance unless 
you have an account 

with Student 

Publkations Inc. Cash, 

check, MasterCard or 

Visa are accepted. 

There is a 125 service 

charge on all returned 

checks We reserve the 

right to edit, reject of 

properly classify any ad 



Free Found Ads 



As a service to you, we 

run found ads for three 

days free of charge 



Corrections 



If you find an error in 

your ad, please call us. 

We accept responsibility 

only for the first wrong 

insertion, 



Cancellations 



If you sell your item 

before your ad has 

expired, we will refund 

you for the remaining 

days. You must call us 

before noon the day 

before the ad is to be 

published. 



Headlines 



For an extra charge, 

we'll put a headline 

above your ad to catch 

the reader's attention. 



1 



ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT | SEX | FOOD | YOUR LIFE 

THE EDGE 



Page 10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Traditionally modern 




PtwtM by Jottyn Brown | COt LEGIAN 

Kyte Rogler, freshman In architecture, performs a number with the Yosakoi Japanese Dance Club In the K-State Student Union Courtyard. Rogler was one of 1 3 people 
to perform with the club on Monday. 

Japanese Yosakoi Dance Club includes members of different ethnicities 



By Eric Brown 

KANSAS STATt COLLEGIAN 

In 2004, Seiji Ikeda returned 
to K State after spending three 
years in Japan, where, among other 
things, he learned to dance a style 
known as Yosakoi. 

But Ikeda's dancing didn't stop 
once he returned to Manhattan. In 
fact, Ikeda is more involved with 
the dance style now than during his 
days in Japan 

He is the creator and coach of 
the Japanese Yosakoi Dance Club 
at K-State. 

Ikeda, graduate student in art, 
started the Yosakoi club by com- 
bining his skills as a coach, which 
he attained as coach of the K-State 



men's rowing team in 1997-2000, 
and his acquired knowledge of Yo- 
sakoi. 

By doing so, Ikeda crested one 
of the few groups in the United 
States that perform this style of 
dance. 

Ikeda began the Yosakoi club to 
create an activity that could include 
both the Japanese Student Associa- 
tion and the Japanese Appreciation 
Alliance 

Since its creation in 2005. the 
Yokasoi club has grown from 30 
to 45 members and has performed 
at a number of on- and off-campus 
events including multicultural and 
greek functions, fundraisers and 
this year's All-University Home- 
coming parade 



On Monday afternoon in the 
K-State Student Union Courtyard, 
Ikeda's dance group performed to 
students in the Festival of Nations, 
which showcased different types of 
dance, costume and other elements 
of cultures from around the world. 

The Yosakoi club has performed 
outside of the Manhattan area, in- 
cluding in the Kansas City area and 
Omaha, Neb. 

Soon the club hopes to perform 
at Yokasoi festivals in Hawaii and 
Washington, D.C., and to compete 
in Japan this summer. 

The dance style of Yokasoi, 
which began in the Japanese city 
of Kochi in 1954, is highly ener- 
getic and combines traditional 
Japanese dance movements with 




i p«rf»rm as one of three dance presentations at the Festival of Holidays, a part of the Festival of Nations 
put on by the Union Program Council. The club has 45 members and Is recruiting new dancers for next semester. 



For more information a bout 
the Japanese Yosakoi 

Dance Club 

— Stop by practice 7-9 p m. Tuesday; and 
Fridays in the K State Student Union Court- 
yard or the International Student Center. 

— For more information nsh wwwhuyo- 
saka.com. 



modern music. 

Though Yosakoi originated in 
Japan and focuses on tradition, 
being of Japanese ethnicity is not 
a requirement to join the group at 
K-State. 

"1 would say that only about half 
of our group's members are of Jap- 
anese origin," Ikeda said. "I think 
this contributes in a positive way to 
the attitude of the group, We try to 
teach embracing other cultures in 
Yosakoi." 

One non-Japanese dance mem- 
ber is Ryan Cloyd. Cloyd said he 
had never danced before, but that 
didn't discourage him from joining 
the group. 

"Yosakoi is as much a social 
thing as it is a dance thing," Cloyd 
said. "There are some people who 
join the group just to be with 
friends, and there are also some 
that join for the exercise." 

Along with including members 
of all nationalities and those with 
no previous dance experience, the 
Yosakoi club also accepts all ages 
Club members range from 6- to 50- 
years-old 

For those interested in joining 
the Yosakoi club, the group prac- 
tices 7-9 p.m. Tuesdays and Fridays 
in the Union Courtyard or the In- 
ternational Student Center. 

You also can find out more about 
the group at uruw.AsuyosaAoi.com. 



BUTTERED | One kite. One truck.Two friends... priceless. 




Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2006 

Farfetched novel 
doesn't develop 
plot, characters 

'Schrodinger's Ball" 
Grade: C- 

M rwtw by tricb him 



SCHRODINGER S 

Ball 




Four friends, one of whom 
might be dead, are wandering Har- 
vard Square. 

But is anyone really dead unless 
observed to be by someone else? 

"Schrodinger's Ball," a novel 
by Adam Felber, aims for a spe- 
cial blend of quantum theory and 
satirical wit, but fails short of a 
scientific explanation. 

Felber uses the infamous 
quantum theory of superposition 
principle proposed by physicist 
Erwin Schrodinger to explain why 
Johnny, who accidentally shot 
himself, is still walking around 
drinking with his friends. Or why 
the president of Montana declares 
war on the rest of the country and 
then flees when things get out of 
control. Or why Schrodinger, who 
died in 1961, is still alive spout- 
ing his theories and hypotheses 
on how our perceptions are the 
determiners of our fates. 

But who can concentrate on 
these things when Schrodinger's 
cat is constantly making a racket 
in the house but is nowhere to be 
found? 

Felber has fresh, distinct ideas 
that would have made for about 
four enticing books, but when 
crammed together in one, his ideas 
are too short-lived to have the 
chance to develop into something 
good. 

All of Felber's chapters end up 
sounding redundant and leave you 
wondering if you're just starting 
the book or finally finishing it. 

Felber's outrageous characters 
and equally strange scenarios will 
shock you, scare you and often 
bore you with their repetition. 

For every small, insignificant 
character like Lester the rat, to 
over the top characters like Deb, 
who has perfected the half-hour 
orgasm, Felber heaves on one ex- 
cessive plot change after another. 

Maybe Felber can take the Har- 
vard Bag lady, another one of his 
batty characters who is rewriting 
the history of the world, and have 
her rewrite his book. 




It might not have been the emarteet idea. 

but sometime* you Just want to % your kite 

when there's no wind. That'e when It's time 

get creative, 



\ 




y^K A N S A S STATE *****". 



COLLEGIAN 



www kstatecoUegian com 



Wednesday. December 6, 2006 



The Wildcats' 
season will end on 
Dec. 28, but their 
future is bright 




Vol 111. No. 74 



Body art, the workplace 




Photo Illustration by Sttvan Doll | COLLEGIAN 



Employees resort to hiding tattoos, piercings to succeed at thier jobs 



By Ucay D. Mackay 

KANSAS 5TATK0UEGIAN 

Chris Tassin, tattoo artist and body pierc- 
er for Fine Line Tattoo in Manhattan, 
has been giving tattoos and piercings 
for 10 years and has seen people of all ages and 
professions walk through the door, including 
military personnel, doctors and K-State teach- 
ers 

Recently, Tassin said, many of the people 
coming in to get tattoos have been middle-aged 
and older women, but no certain age, gender or 
profession can be names as the tattoo or body- 
piercing group. 

"There's really not a type of person," she 
said. 

But the undeniable truth is people are get- 
ting tattoos and piercings they can hide for 
work or interviews. 

"Most people are trying to keep them under 



their clothing for their jobs," Tassin said. 

Kerri Day Keller, director of Career and 
Employment Services, said students need to 
show they care about their appearance and put 
thought into how they present themselves 

"What you look like isn't solely what 
counts," she said. 

Keller said physical attributes do seem to af- 
fect employers overall. 

"If you come in with disheveled hair and 
dirty shoes, that probably wont make the most 
positive impression," she said. 

Susan Williams, professor of sociology, said 
some businesses might prefer employees with 
out excess piercings and tattoos, either from 
personal preference or for the overall appear- 
ance of staff. 

"Some may have a personal problem, but 1 
suspect that most who do voice an objection 
think that it will hurt their bottom line - that 
customers won't come there if the staff sports 



tattoos," she said. "Perhaps what the majority 
do not consider is that the tattoo trend has 
changed tremendously in the past 10 to 15 
years." 

While visible tattoos and body piercings 
might affect some employers, Keller said other 
organizations and businesses do not view these 
as an issue when hiring. 

For people seeking jobs in traditional set- 
tings like banks or accounting firms, Keller 
said tattoos and piercings will have more effect 
on employers than more informal settings like 
non-profit organizations or more creative envi- 
ronments. 

"If you are interviewing with a more con- 
servative industry, there are just some things 
you have to do to present yourself and get your 
skills and knowledge noticed and establish 
some credibility," she said "Later on in the job, 

Sm TATTOOS Paget 



Car crashes into store front; 
business remains open 



By Austin Appla 

KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

A woman hit a parked car and then crashed through Carpet 
Plus, 300 N. Third St., Monday morning after losing control of 
her car. said Lt. Mike Quintanar with the Riley County Police 
Department. 

Velta Kramer. 79, was driving a white 1993 Subaru tmpreza at 
the time of the accident, Quintanar said 

Laura Douglas, an employee of Carpet Plus, said she was pres- 
ent at the time of the accident and offered her take on what hap 
pened. 

"Kramer lost control of her car when her gas pedal got stuck," 
Douglas said 

Kramer then hit an electrical post and continued on until her 
vehicle came to rest in the front of the store, Douglas said. 

"The driver damaged a display case and the front door," Quin- 
tanar said. 

Although Carpet Plus sustained a large amount of damage, it 
still is open, Douglas said. 

"The windows are boarded up and some things are still bro- 
ken, but we have cleaned up, and our store is still functional," 
Douglas said 



Freshman leads K-State 




Catrina Rawson | COLLEGIAN 
K-Sfata's Jason Barman brings down a 
rebound Tuesday evening In the Wildcats 93- 
60 win over Cleveland State. 



By Jonathan Garten 

KANSAS SIATE COLLEGIAN 

The seven-foot-three, 260- 
pound | a so ii Bennett lumbered 
out lo the perimeter and deflected 
a shot by Cleveland State guard 
Joe Davis He managed to grab the 
ball off the tip but stepped out of 
bounds with less than seven min- 
utes to play in the first half. 

The Vikings barely had time to 
inbound the ball before Bennett 
blocked another shot 10 seconds 
later. Bennett finished the half 
with five blocks, which helped K- 
State (5-3) beat Cleveland State 
93-60 Tuesday night at Bramlage 
Coliseum 

"I've been trying to beat the 
most blocks in a game record," 
Bennett said. "Now I'm trying to 
get the most blocks for a fresh- 
man" 

S« CLEVELAND STATE Page 6 



Appleby 
found guilty 
in murder of 
KSU student 



tHE ASSOCIATED PSE55 

OLATHE, Kan. - A former swim- 
ming pool maintenance worker was 
convicted Tuesday of killing a college 
student in 2002 at the northeast Kansas 
pool where she held a summer job. 

Jurors in Johnson County District 
Court deliberated less than three hours 
before finding 31-year-old Benjamin 
Appleby guilty of capital murder and 
attempted rape. Appleby's lawyers had 
rested their case earlier Tuesday without 
calling any witnesses. 

Ali Kemp. 19, was found beaten and 
strangled on June 18, 2002, in the pump 
room of a Lea wood community pool 
where she was working in the summer 
after her freshman year at K State. 

Appleby, who had a pool mainte- 
nance business at the time, was arrested 
in November 2004 in Bantam, Conn., 
where he was living with his fiancee 
under an alias Authorities tracked him 
there after receiving an anonymous tip. 

Prosecutors were not seeking the 
death penalty, meaning the maximum 
sentence Appleby faces is life in prison 
with no chance of parole for 50 years. 

See KEMP Fsgel 



Conservatory 
closed for 
restoration 



By Duttirv Sanbor n 

KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



The historic conservatory at K-State 
University Gardens has been closed for 
restoration. 

The two-year project for the building 
will cost $450,000, said Tom Warner, 
head of the horticulture and forestry de 
partment. 

Warner said the conservatory is being 
repaired so it will be safe for students to 
work in. 

"The conservatory has been a great 
learning lab for students, but the struc- 
ture has weakened to the point where 
safety is a concern," Warner said 

The project is being funded by private 
donors, he said. 

"Right now we are in the silent phase 
of fundraising," Wamer said. "A formal 
statement (of what is going on) will be 
made in March" 

To restore the conservatory, people 
from the department of horticulture 
and forestry had to move plants, some 
of which have been in the conservatory 
since it opened in 1909, 

The smaller plants are being moved 
to the greenhouse at Throckmorton 
Hall, and others will be adopted by com- 
munity members. 

The next phase will to sand and 
reglaze the metal beams and put new 
glass into the conservatory, Wamer 
said. 

After the restoration is complete, the 
conservatory will be reopened. 

"If all goes as planned, the University 
Conservatory will reopen on or right 
around its 100th birthday," Wamer said 



Today's forecast 

Sunny 
High: SO Low: 14 



INSIDE 



Safe and secure 

Riley County Police Department offker offers 
advice regarding simple precautions that can 
make sun students and all their valuables make 
It home for the holidays safely. 
See story Pag* 7 



CAMPUS NEWS HIGHLIGHTS 



Outstanding senior 

Audrey Ladenburgef, senior in ac- 
counting, was named the College 
of Business Administration's fall 
2006 Outstanding Senior. She will 
be recognized at the commence- 
ment ceremony at noon Saturday. 
The award Is given each semester 
to a graduating senior who has 
contributed to the College of Busi- 
ness Administration. 



Teaching Excellence 

Dann Fisher, associate professor of 
accounting, has won the Kansas 

State Bank Teaching Excellence 
Award. Fischer is a Oeloitteand 
Touch? faculty Fellow. He is 
known around the nation for his 
research on ethics and account- 
ing He will be recognized at 
Saturday's commencement 
ceremony. 



Research Award 

Cnwen Sheu, professor of manage- 
ment and Paul tdgerley Chair in 
Business Administration, has won 
the College of Business Adminis- 
tration Outstanding Contribution 
in Research Award. Sheu is the 
president elect of the Global 
Manufacturing Research Group. 
He will be recognized at Satu relay's 
commencement ceremony. 



Israel /Hezbollah conflict 

Of the Ifc* entities teted, one in lour L*b*i*w told the UnWSWKrrtnirly 
responsible for last surrmertcmffewrmHezbolah. 




1 



Page 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2006 



'Call 



776-5577 

Puzzles | Eugene Sheffer 




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ON THE WEB 

The version of the Collegian that doesn't leave ink on your fingers 

Your picks for Photo of the Week 




These are the last results of photo of the week for 
the fall semester. To see what photos our photog 
raphers liked best this semester, check out the 
Finals Guide, coming Monday. 



By DonnieJay 



WB YMHROA KC HRO YKXOCH 

VFFN MH FLA DFVMD 

KHMDKMX AOCHMLAMXH. RO 

WMNOC M EAOHHB EOXXO. 
Yesterday's Cryploquip: IF A PERSON I ROM 
HELSINKI ATTEMPTS TO TRICK YOU. MIGHT 
YOU CALL THAT FINN-AGLINC. ' 

Today's Cryploquip Clue; R equals H 




The planner 

Campus bulletin board 

The planner is the (oll«jwr»'v campus buletin 
beard service. Items in the calendar can be 
published 1 9 to three times. Items might not 
appec; because of space constraints but are 
guaranteed to appear on the day of the activ- 
ity. To place an item in the Campus Calendar, 
stop by Kedzie 1 16 and fill out a form or 
e mail the news ed itor at coRtgiorWspub. teu. 
«(u by 11 am two days before Mis to run. 

■ The Graduate School announces the 
final oral defense of the doctoral disserta 

I ion of lanis C row at 2:30 p.m. today in talvm 
217. 

■ Jaime D. Barnes from the University 
of New Mexko will present "Studying 
Serpentlnization, Seafknr Tectonics and Arc 
Vokamsm Using CI Stable Isotopes" at 4 p.m. 
today in Thompson 21 3. The presentation is 
part of the Geology Seminar Series sponsored 
by the Department of Geology. 

■ The Graduate School announces the 
final oral defense of the doctoral disserta- 
tion of Patricia Manosatva at 9 a.m. Monday 
in Throckmorton 4031. 

■ The Graduate School announces the 
final oral defense of the doctoral disserta- 
tion of Mendith Pease at 8 a.m. Dec 1 J In 
Bluemont 487. 

■ The Graduate School announcci 
the final oral defense of the doctoral dis- 
sertation of Peter [loin at 10 a.m. Dec. 14 In 
Bluemont 487 

■ The KSU Save Oarfur Team b collect- 
ing new and used youth and children's 
clothing, personal care items like toothpaste 
and soap and school supplies for Darfur 
refugees in Sudan, Africa Donations will 

be accepted in a collection box in the Union 
Courtyard until Dec. 15 



Corrections and 
clarifications 

There was an error in Monday's Collegian. Mtss 
Black and Gold (s Amber Tyler. There was an 
error in Tuesday's Collegian. There is a Manhat 
tan Freecycle. The Collegian regrefc the errors 
If you see something that should be corrected, 
call news editor Leann Suuen at (78S) 532 
6556 or e mail idkgiaix^pub.kiu.du 



Kansas State Collegian 

(USPS 291 020) The Kansas State Col- 
legian, a student newspaper at Kansas 
State University, is published by Student 
Publications Inc., Kedzie 103, Manhat- 
tan, KS 66506. The Collegian is published 
weekdays during the school year and 
on Wednesdays during the summer 
Periodical postage is paid at Manhattan, 
KS66SQ2. POSTMASTER: Send address 
changes to Kansas State Collegian, 
circulation desk, Kedzie 103, Manhattan. 
KS66S06-7167. 
© Kansas State Collegian, 2006 



The blotter | Arrests in Riley 
County online at www.kstotecol- 

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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Pag« 3 



Commissioners 

consider shelter 

renovations 



By Natasha Mayan 
KANSAS STATE COiLEGIAH 

A grant in January 2007 
might be passed to rezone the 
Manhattan Emergency Shel 
ter located at the northwest 
comer of South Fourth and 
Yuma streets. The announce 
ment was made at the city 
commission meeting Tuesday 
evening at City Hall. 

The two-phase project will 
renovate the Emergency Shel 
ter Building and the Tran- 
sitional Housing Building 
The project also will include 
placing signs (hat contain ad- 
dress numerals, real estate 
signs and holiday decora- 
tions. Lighting, landscaping, 
screening and a drainage sys 
tern also will be addressed 

Assistant director for 
Planning Eric Cattell said be 
cause only 15 percent of the 
residents living in the shelter 
have automobiles, parking 
spaces for that percentage of 
people will be added 

According to the city 
commission agenda, approxi- 
mately 29 percent of the site 
is open space that will be 
owned and maintained by 
the applicants. Under one 
of the alternative options, a 
playground for children will 
also be included. 

The Emergency Shelter 
Building has sleeping rooms 
for families, men and women 
and has bathrooms for guests 
In the Transitional Housing 
Building there is a kitchen 
and laundry facility, a sitting 
area and three bedrooms, al- 
though in the new plan there 
are going to be 24 bedrooms, 
allowing eight families or 32 
people to live there at once. 

Mandy Chapman Semple, 



Check 

out 



executive director of the 
program, described why the 
buildings' locations are of 
such importance to the cli- 
ents 

"Downtown offers a lot 
of services that are viable," 
Chapman Semple said. "We 
are going to be close to all 
of the temporary services, 
which is what our clients use 
for resources." 

If the grant is proposed in 
January, Chapman Semple 
said she is hoping to be back 
in the shelter by summer 
2008, although if the program 
isn't awarded the money, the 
move- in date may be pushed 
back. Chapman Semple said 
she will get the money, re- 
gardless of obstacles. 

"If this doesn't happen, 
then some form of amend- 
ment will have to happen," 
Eric Cattell, assistant director 
for planning, said. 

Another development in 
Manhattan that was brought 
up during the meeting is the 
Mead owl ark Hills Residen- 
tial Planned Unit Develop- 
ment, a facility for the elderly, 
which will be constructed in 
four phases 

The first phase, which will 
start in the spring of 2007, 
will be building eleven new 
cottages, although the embel- 
lishments won't be visible to 
people passing by. 

"We want to establish the 
development and meet the 
needs of our older popula- 
tion," Leon Brown, landscape 
architect, said. 

Before next week's City 
Commission meeting, a holi- 
day reception open to the 
public will be offered at 5;30 
p.m. in the City Commission 
Room at City Hall 




SMvan Doll | COLLEGIA* 

Guitarist Jason Hamlin, laft, and DJ L*a, members of Scratchtrack, perform in the Union Courtyard on Tuesday in the K State Student Union. 
The duo tour the country performing. 

Band stops at Student Union for free concert 



By Eric Davit 

KANSAS MATE (OUEGIAN 

Students walking through 
the K state Student Union 
Tuesday were greeted by the 
music of Scratchtrack, a duo 
that tours the country per- 
forming 

When the show began, 
only a few people were sitting 
around the stage. As the show 
wore on, more people arrived 
to listen to the music 

Kory Pederson, senior in 
pre counseling, made sure to 
get an early seat. 



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OF THE 

/^K ANSAS STATE 

Collegian 



"My friends told me about 
them and 1 checked them 
out," Pederson said as he 
waited for the show to begin. 

After the first song. DJ Lee 
took the microphone and 
talked with the crowd Lee 
explained the band's history 
as he prompted the crowd to 
cheer for the band. 

Other audience members 
walked by at just the right 
time Preston Sperry, gradu- 
ate student in business ad 
ministration, said he was 
walking toward the door 
when he heard Hamilton's 



slide guitar and decided to sit 
down 

"I like the way they mix 
their styles." Sperry said as 
the band begin to play their 
next song "1 think I'll check 
them out." 

According the band's Web 
site, Scratchtrack started as a 
trio in 2000 in Jackson, Tenn 
Band members said they 
formed the band primarily as 
a release from the pressures 
of school, but they decided to 
write and perform more often 
after they played a college va 
riety show. 



The band then moved to 
Martha's Vineyard and began 
touring and writing full-time. 

During the performance, 
guitar player Jason Hamlin 
kept a slide on his pinky for 
the first two songs and played 
four-finger cords, wrapping 
his thumb around the neck of 
his instrument. 

The other member of the 
band. D| Lee, beat-boxed 
over Hamlin's guitar. For 
one track, DJ Lee live-looped 
some of his vocal beats and 
added hip- hop -style lyrics 
over the track. 



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OPINION 



M 



Page 4 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2006 



Gamers' remorse 

Hype surrounding video-gaming systems inspires violence among customers waiting in line 

Video gaming technology it new syitem. A group of ttudent* Running of the Bulls, not buying a Our society has become far too Customers have been waiting for 




SCOTT 
GIRARD 



Video gaming technology is 
astounding The graphics, types 
of games available and overall 
picture provide 
for a variety of 
enjoyable oppor- 
tunities. 

Along 
with this new 
technology, 
though, comes 
the need to get 
the best as soon 
" as possible. Two 
new technologically superior - and 
of course expensive - gaming 
systems were released last month, 
producing enormous lines outside 
of Best Buys and Wal- Marts all 
over the country. 

Customers braved the cold and 
skipped class and work just to get 
the opportunity to buy one of the 
Nintendo Wii or Playstation 3 sys- 
tems of limited supply 

What is interesting, though, 
is that many of the people in line 
planned to sell the systems on eBay 
for as much as $2,000. The lure of a 
massive profit made several poten- 
tial customers a little restless Rob- 
bery attempts and other acts of vio- 
lence and inappropriate behavior 
occurred. 

Even former vice presidential 
candidate John Edwards was ac- 
cused by a Wal-Mart employee of 
trying to-cut in line for an opportu- 
nity to buy a Playstation 3. 

In Connecticut, one person was 
shot while two robbers tried to rob 
a line of customers waiting for the 



new system. A group of students 
from North Carolina teamed up 
to accost another student that had 
waited three hours in line just to 
buy the systems and took them 
while he was unloading them. 
One of the students was killed last 
Friday after the cops went to his 
apartment to look for the missing 
systems. 

According to CNN, the student 
reportedly opened the door 
holding some type of device 
The police did not risk it 
being a gun and fatally 
shot him This might 
have been be a little 
severe, but that is a 
separate issue 

What is certain is this 
type of merchandise can 
cause violence. A few 
gaming systems are 
inconsequential 
compared to a hu- 
man life. 

Stampedes, ar- 
rests, injuries and 
death : these 
things usually 
are associated 
with events 
like gang 
violence or the 



Running of the Bulls, not buying a 
video game. This is ridiculous 

Video games are fun, but they 
are not worth the sacrifice of my 
grades, job or health. I would 
rather just wait a few months to 
buy the system when it might be a 
little less expensive and definitely 
less dangerous. 



Our society has become far too 
impatient People will jump at any 
opportunity to get rich quickly, 
without even examining the conse- 
quences 

I could blame the makers of the 
video games for hyping the systems 
so much and only releasing a small 
number of systems at a time. 




Customers have been waiting for' 
a long time and will do anything to 
get one of those bundles of virtual 
enjoyment. 

But I blame the customers for 
this apparent slip of logic and real- 
ity. These are just games Unless 
these people plan to turn 
the video game connoisseur 
into a profitable career, I 
do not see the point. 
Games can be a 
nice break from reality 
and offer moments of en- 
tertainment, but for most, 
the games will not get I 
them a job in the real 
world. 

Classes, jobs, family and 
friends are more important 
i being one of the first 
to buy a new gaming 
system. 

Patience is a vir- 
tue no matter how 
nice the graphics 
are. 



Scott (ford is i sophomore 
in super (trial issues. Ptenj* 
tend only strut comments to 

opinion i-spu6.tou.tdu. 



President needs to take study group's recommendations seriously 




Today is the day 

Finally, after all the speculation and antici 
pation, this day has arrived. No, I'm 
not talking about the new episode 
of The Biggest Loser" on N BC. To- 
day, the Iraq Study Group's report 
of the situation in Iraq is expected 
The group, also known as the 
Baker-Hamilton Commission, 
was formed in March and is 
supposed to give a bipartisan 
assessment of the conflict in Iraq, 
which, as we all know, is not a 
civil war 

Or at least that's what we're 
told. 

Reports were leaked in the 
New York Times that the 
group might recommend the 
withdrawal of some U.S. forces 
in Iraq. But, according to 
News week's cover story, 
the head of the commission 
has said that is untrue, 
[ames Baker III, the former 
secretary of state and leader of the group 
that bears his name, denied speculation 
they will say a withdrawal of troops is the 
solution. However, according to Newsweek, 
the commission most likely will recommend 




OWEN 

KENNEDY 



American forces take more of a training role 
so the Iraqis finally can learn how to take 
control of their own country. 
This last week, President Bush de- 
nounced the idea of a graceful with- 
drawal from Iraq, saying he saw no 
realism in the idea. But Baker appar 
ently sees some possibility in this 

What Bush thinks of when he hears 
withdrawal is all troops out of Iraq by, 
say, this Thursday at 9 a.m. 

He has refused to consider bring- 
ing troops home in phases, which has 
been proposed by the Democratic 
leadership in Congress. 

Baker's proposal, in the spirit of biparti 
sanism. is a bit of a hybrid between the two: 
troops aren't bailing out of Iraq completely, 
but they won't be on the front lines in the civil 
war anymore. 

Oops, 1 meant terrorist- and faith-based 
skirmish 

We only can hope Bush will listen to the 
commission. They certainly have bought him 
some valuable time. Anytime a reporter, law- 
maker, voter or dirty liberal asks him about 
Iraq, he simply says he is waiting on Baker's 
report. 

Well, the time has come, and he can either 
pay heed to what the commission recom- 



mends or continue to talk of victory and 
getting the job done for a few more months, 
without giving any hint of how to fix the prob- 
lem, whatever it may be. 

If he decides the group's ideas aren't the 
best way forward, we will get to enjoy a few 
more months of speeches about the America- 
hating cut and runners. If Bush doesn't like 
the group's conclusions, he'll tell us Defense 
Secretary nominee Bob Gates will need time 
to figure out what to do in Iraq 

Yay, more wasting time. 

Since Baker's recommendations are non- 
binding, little action will be taken in the short 
run The media probably will give too much 
attention to this, and pundits will argue about 
whether the commission is proposing defeat 
or if they're covering Bush's backside 

Hopefully, their proposals are realistic, 
and to the liking, to some extent, of those in 
power. 

If not, the commission wilt fade into oblivi- ' 
on, and we will return to telling ourselves that '. 
the mission was accomplished long ago. 

Just ask the U.S.S. Abraham Lincoln 



Owen Kennedy is a frit guy and his did owns a dealership. ~ 
Fellow frttttrs ind DtCnssi (in dub members can send their. 
comments to opmmnMspub.ksv.rdu. 



B /^K Uiii STATE 

f Collegian 



Emily Llwrtnc* | IDi«0S IN CUM I 

Ktrrv f-lKhtf I UMttMG EDITN 

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KrtMtn Rsdwkk | rtMPusf DITOR 

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The Collegian wekomts your letters 10 the editor. 
They can be submitted by e-mail to itntnUspub. 
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Tft THF POINT I * n editorial selected and debated by the editorial board and written after a majority 
I V I ItL r vllH I | opinion is formed. This Is the Collegian's official opinion. 

Tattoos shouldn't be a big deal to employers 



People get tattoos for 
many reasons - to remem- 
ber loved ones, celebrate 
past events or sometimes 
just for fun. 

For many, the sound of 
a tattoo gun and sensation 
of a needle entering their 
skin is as addicting as any 
known drug. 

Through strict regula- 
tions, the tattoo industry 
has become safer than in 
recent history. AH argu- 
ments associating tattoos 
with the lower aspects of 
our society are now null 
and void. 

However, tattoos still are 



frowned upon in the United 
States, and getting one in 
an easily visible place might 
hinder you in the future. 

This must be considered 
before inking your skin. 

If you want that high- 
paying job, you'll probably 
have to sacrifice getting tat- 
toos on any area that might 
not seem professional. 

While you might not 
agree with the logic, busi- 
nesses still maintain the 
right to insist their employ- 
ees appear clean cut. 

But, in a free society, 
this should not happen. 
Whether you oppose upon 



religious objections or just 
the complete stupidity of it, 
you don't have the right to 
judge anyone who makes 
the decision to get one. 

The idea that the best 
person for a job is going to 
be overlooked simply be- 
cause they've changed the 
color of their skin is idiotic. 

We can be proud we're 
free to do what we want 
with our bodies. If the tat- 
too is important enough, 
we're allowed to get it 
anywhere a tattoo artist is 
willing to go. 

In the end, the choice is 
yours. 



CAMPUS FOURUM 

395-4444 or- 

fourum@5pub.ksu.edu 

The Campus Fourum Is the Collegian s anonymous 
call-in system. The fouium is edited to eliminate vulgar* 
racist, obscene arid libelous comments The comments J 
ate not the opinion of the Collegian nor art they 
endorsed by the editorial stall 

Don't forget your toonskln hat. It you knew what I 
mean 

Ingoing » build a device tor my room mite that 
allows him to bomb squirrels. 

Laura is* flaky glri. 

You know Itttlmo to buy I new car when you have to - 
tie the front of you r car on with a rope. Z 

m 

Ml I want for Christmas is Katie V, 

p 
Hey, Katie, I'm )otnlng Betca's side In our prink war. : 

You art only Important It you are In Cakeland 

l)ustntededto dear up that lavler loves Katie. Z 



Heed more Fourum? Go to www.ka a ttaMt^an^ 
comfor rot full version, I 



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I 



Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2006 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Pages 



TO THE EDITOR 

Outdated sources, misplaced arguments fail 
to prove recycling a waste of time, money 



Editor, 

In his Nov. 16 editorial 
"Bunch of Garbage," Chuck 
Armstrong claims he proves 
recycling neither saves money 
nor protects the environment, 
but he falls far short of that 
goal. 

First, given the wealth of 
research and statistics available 
on solid waste management 
and recycling, it's amazing how 
the author mentioned only the 
most dated and inappropriate 
sources. 

)ust a few examples are 
citing only one recycling 



company operating in the red 
as proof that recycling has no 
economic foundation, a quote 
from a nearly 20-year-old EPA 
pamphlet, and a description 
of landfill technology horn 
a person with a doctorate in 
physiology. 

Armstrong looks only at the 
simplest of economics - raw 
materials are cheaper - with- 
out considering other costs, 
such as long-term sustainability, 
air quality and a host of others. 

Armstrong could have 
mentioned recycling in the 
United Stales prevents the 
release of more than 30 million 



tons of carbon into the air per 
year. He could have considered 
the many communities in the 
United States that no longer 
have space for landfills But he 
chose to stick with arguments 
like it making environmental 
sense to waste paper because 
it means more trees will be 
planted. 

Armstrong certainly is 
entitled to his opinion on 
recycling, but he shouldn't feel 
he's proven recycling has no 
benefit. 

Martin Court oti 
INFORMATION IKNNOIKV ASSISTANCE CfHTER 



Richards outburst should not be taken lightly; 
attempt at humor reveals deep, racial prejudices 



Editor. 

[ commend Jonas Hogg 
for expressing his opinion 
about the comments made by 
Michael Richards 

However, in doing so, Hogg 
has exposed his lack of ethnic 
competency He seems to view 
this as an incident in which 
minor insults led to hurt feel- 
ings. I argue that this is more 
than hurt feelings. 

This is bigger than Richards 
and his audience members 
This is a public issue of racism 

The outburst Richards 
made showed deep-seated 
anger and hostility toward 



African Americans in par- 
ticular. He used the N-word 
in a derogatory manner and 
attempted to pass it off as 
humor. 

The acceptance of such 
an outright racist outburst 
should not be an option. The 
comments offended not only 
the African Americans in the 
audience but others who value 
ethnic and cultural diversity, 

Ask yourself: do you want 
to live in a world in which 
people are categorized, ex- 
cluded, oppressed and judged 
on the basis of race? I don't, 
and 1 feel that we cannot move 
toward racial and cultural 



harmony if we continue to pre- 
tend racism does not exist or 
is somehow OK. If we pass off 
the seriousness of this incident, 
we will in a sense condone 
such ignorant behavior. 

I urge you, as students and 
faculty capable of making the 
change, to do so. 

Do not let this be so quickly 
swept under the rug. Keep 
talking. 

Express your opinions. 
Through dialogue we can ad- 
dress racism and end it. 

Angela N, Nkholi 

MAY 2006 GRADUATE IN KWESIOLOCf MINOR IN 

IEADERSHIP STUDIES 



Shelter forced to turn away some during 
holiday season; help from community needed 



Editor, 

An important community 
issue that requires the sup- 
port of Manhattan residents 
and students alike has come 
to my attention. 

The Manhattan Emergen- 
cy Shelter has far reached 
its limits for receiving and 
caring for the community's 
homeless and has been hav- 
ing to turn away homeless 
families and individuals. 

The most realistic and ef- 
ficient alternative is to build 
a new shelter. 

The current shelter is 
working to raise a total of 
more than $12 million to 
build a new facility that will 
house 52 people, more than 



twice as many individuals as 
the current facility. 

It also will offer more 
storage for supplies and 
new opportunities for social 
service agents to care for 
and enable residents to gain 
foundations for support 

Recent efforts have been 
fruitful, and after graciously 
receiving the Carolyn Pine 
Grant and a Community 
Block Grant from the Kansas 
Department of Commerce, 
the shelter has raised more 
than $800,000 

It is important for resi 
dents and students to see the 
need to take action against 
this community problem and 
support the shelter through 
financial and volunteer ef- 



forts. 

Donations also are 
requested, as personal care 
items always are in need. 

With more than $300,000 
still to be raised, please, for 
the sake of the community 
and all its members it, con- 
tact the Manhattan Emer- 
gency Shelter Inc. at (785) 
537- 3 1 1 3 and see how you 
can support the building of 
the new shelter facility. 

JOI tph Ab*r 
JUNIOR IN SOCIAL WORK 





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4.9 PM 

l.i. M>U. BBC', H— , M.4.4. 1 w BBC 

>} CUALLFftOZKN 
-*-» DftlMKft 



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** AUSTIN I* 



M Will* 

> J U> POMMYK 

JU IK IIIU 

Ofwn *» 4 

Now Idklnn AnplU.it j<H)k 





. 776-5577.=,. 

^ ^ 



ROYAL PURPLE 



o o 



we've got the stories you've got to read. 



Get your Royal Purple yearbook 
in Kedzie 103, or call 785-532-6555. 



Students urged to stay 
safe over holiday season 




Wildcats, 

One down, one to go. 

Thanks to each and every 
Wildcat for an incredible 
fall semester 1 feel honored 



to ride the wave of success 
we have had this fall With 
Thanksgiving just past and 
the holiday season approach- 
ing, we should reflect on our 
blessings, for they truly have 
been many. Another Marshall 
scholar awarded, an upset 
victory over Texas in football, 
and a visit by the Secretary 
of Defense just days after a 
momentous political turnover 
are just a few. 

We opened the Biosecurity 
Research Institute and named 
it in honor of Sen. Pat Rob- 
erts, and we've created what 
might become a new tradition 



here at K State - lighting Up 
the Utile Apple: A K-State 
Holiday. And don't forget the 
ground breaking M K Slate 
Salina, where students look 
forward to the construction 
of a truly remarkable Student 
life Center, 

There is but one wish I 
have for everyone over the 
break: stay safe. I hope you 
all enjoy the rest, and I look 
forward to continuing yet 
another banner year as Wild- 
cats. 



S1U0ENT BODY Pfif SIOSN! 



Students use college years as 
time of religious exploration 



By Eric Da wi j 
KANSAS STATE COUIGMN 

Many students are on a 
quest for religion, according 
to a recent study - and some 
students at K- State said they 
are no different. 

The study, released Oct. 
6 by the Higher Education 
Research Institute, found 74 
percent of students are hav- 
ing conversations with their 
friends in an attempt to de- 
termine the best way religion 
for them, according the HER] 
Web site More than 112,230 
students participated in the 
survey. 



Mark Cordon, junior in 
psychology, said he is on a 
spiritual quest, but not in an 
attempt to find himself. 

"I believe that you are al- 
ways on a journey, and God 
is found in that journey," he 
said 

He said he cares more 
about his relationship with 
God than being involved with 
mainstream religion 

l think that the most im- 
portant thing is that you are 
true to yourself. As long as you 
are, then you will find a way 
eventually," he said. 

While some said they are 
seeking God, others said they 



are skeptical of the church. 

"1 went to church for years, 
and then 1 had a negative ex- 
perience," said Teny Sawdy, 
sophomore in elementary edu- 
cation. "When 1 turned to the 
church for help, I was judged 
and looked down upon That 
really just turned me off to the 
church." 

Even so, Sawdy said she is 
still religious. 

Cordon said he is still 
working on his thoughts about 
life after death He said he be- 
lieves it is up to the person 
about life after death. 

"1 can't believe that it is 
black and white," he said. 



See a photo 
opportunity?, 




Call 532-6556 

«f"M A N S A S STATE 

Collegian 



Sell Your Textbooks 

J CASH! 





at 
Varney's Book Store - InAggievilk 

Textbook Department 

Buy Back Hours: 

Mon, Dec 1 1 th - Fri, Dec 1 5th : 
9:00 am - 8:00 pm 




%4I M **\ 



*You don't need your receipt 

*lt doesn't matter where your 
books were purchased 

*Please bring a current photo ID 




SPORTS 



Page 6 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2006 



Analysis 



K-State goes inside early, often in win 



By Nkk Dunn 

KANSAS STATE COUE&IAN 

One specific play in K-State's 93- 
60 victory over Cleveland State Tues- 
day reflected a change in mentality of 
the entire team. 

The Wildcats already had the 
game sealed, ahead 53-27 early in the 
second half. Senior forward Cartier 



Martin exploded along the left base- 
line, jumped in the air, absorbed the 
contact from a Viking defender and 
put in an acrobatic layup as the whis- 
tle blew. 

A blocking foul was called on 
Cleveland State - Martin to the line 
for a chance at a three-point play 

"That was all skill," Martin joked 
after the game "Coach (Bob Hug- 




Catrina Rawtort | COLLEGIAN 
K-Stata's Cartier Martin looks to drive around Cleveland State's Kevin Francis 
Tuesday evening during the Wildcats 93-60 win over the Vikings. 



gins) wanted us to be aggressive 
around the basket. If it had been a 
charge, then hey, I'd still be going to 
the basket hard trying to get fouled." 

Martin missed the following free 
throw, but the assertiveness required 
to take it to the hole that strong 
was something sorely missing in the 
team's previous two losses at Califor- 
nia and Colorado State 

The Wildcats jumped on the Vi- 
kings early, sinking nine shots before 
Cleveland State could make a field 
goal. The good shooting continued 
all game, and K-State finished shoot- 
ing a season-high 61.5 percent from 
the field. The previous high was a 
50.8-pcrcent performance against 
Tennessee Tech. 

The main reason for the great 
shooting boiled down to a simple 
basketball law - it's easier to make 
shots if you're closer to the basket. 
And it's easier to get shots close to 
the basket if you're aggressive about 
driving it into the paint 

"That's the way we're supposed 
to play," Muggins said. "We have 
not been very assertive We attacked 
the basket. We threw il in close. We 
went at the basket rather than fading 
away" 

The Wildcats outscored Colorado 
State 46-26 in the paint and hit 16 of 
24 shots in the first half on the way 



to a comfortable 50-23 advantage 
at the break. More importantly, the 
Wildcats shot only three 3-pointers 
and drew 17 fouls on the Vikings. All 
the fouls led to lb-of-21 free-throw 
shooting. 

" We got a bunch of layups and foul 
shots," Huggins said. "If you think 
about it, you can miss every shot, but 
if you rebound them and put them in, 
you're shooting 50 percent." 

In its two previous losses, K-State 
combined to shoot 45 3-pointers, 
compared to only 22 free throws 
The Wildcats finished Tuesday's con- 
test with 11 3-pointers and 35 free 
throws. 

"They were a small team," fresh- 
man center Jason Bennett said "We 
thought if we'd take it to the basket, 
get more inside shots, then they'd 
crowd in and we could ditch it" 

By comparison, an obviously 
overmatched Cleveland State squad 
settled for deep, contested shots 
throughout the contest. The Vikings 
finished 3-of-22 from 3-point range 
and missed 16 of their first 17 shots 
from long distance. 

"We didn't do anything," Viking 
forward Patrick Tatham said. "We 
went away from our offense to start- 
ing at half court. That's, not what we 
do We went away from everything 
we do." 



CLEVELAND STATE 

Wildcats hold Vikings leading 
scorer Bullock to 8 points 

Continued from Page 1 

With 22 blocks this season, Bennett is a heady close 
to breaking the freshman record of 24 held by Shawn 
Rhodes set in 1996. Bennett leads the Big 12 Conference 
in blocks and has swatted more shots than Nebraska's 
entire team, which has 16 blocks on the season. 

At more than seven feet tall, Bennett is expected to 
block shots However, his career-high 1 1 points came as 
a bit of a surprise. 

"I don't know if he'll get 1 1 every night, but he ought 
to be able to score if he rebounds," coach Bob Huggins 
said. 

((-Stale's other freshman big man, Luis Colon, also 
finished with a career high in points with nine. Colon 
was back in action after serving a one-game suspension 
after being ejected from a game for throwing a punch 
against California on Nov. 29. 

Senior forward Cartier Martin led the Wildcats in 
scoring with 21 points on 6-of-8 shooting from the field. 

After scoring a combined six points in his previous 
two games, junior forward David Hoskins was second, 
scoring 17 

K-Slate led at halftime 50-23 The 50 points were the 
most the Wildcats scored in a first half all year. 

A big reason for all the early offense was the Wild- 
cats' willingness to drive to the basket and draw contact. 
Cleveland State committed 17 first-hall fouls, which K- 
State used to convert 16-of-21 free throws. 

"We just wanted to be aggressive and attack the rim," 
Hoskins said 

The Vikings' leading scorer, sophomore forward 
I'Nathan Bullock, was limited to only three, first-half 
points Bullock finished with eight points, which is six 
less than his average. 

Huggins credited Bennett's defensive presence for 
Bullock's off night. 

"He got swallowed up by size," Huggins said. "It's hard 
to score on |ason when he's in." 

For the first time all season the Wildcats shot better 
than 60 percent from the field K-State used several la 
yups and dunks to inflate that number. 

"Thai's the way we're supposed to play," Huggins said. 
"We haven't been very assertive We went from shooting 
30 threes a game to only three in the first half." 

With the win. Huggins is now 6-5 all-time against 
Cleveland State. The Vikings beat Huggins five times 
while he was a coach at Akron between 1984 and 1989 




Chrittophar Hanawtncfcal | (OLKGIAK 
K State'i David Hoskins slams two of his 1 7 points during the first half Tuesday evening. The Wildcats 
defeated Cleveland State 93-60. 



Women's basketball team escapes with rare road win 



By Jeffrey Rake 
MNVASST»TE(OLlEGlAN 

The Thomas Assembly Center has 
been a house of horrors for visiting 
teams through the years. 

It almost was for the K State wom- 
en's basketball team Tuesday 

The Wildcats (7-1) nearly blew 
a 20- point first-half lead, narrowly 
escaping Huston, La., with a 64-61 
win over Louisiana Tech on Tuesday 
night. It was just the 23rd time in 24 
years that the Lady Techsters lost a 
home game. K-Stale became the third 
unranked team ever to defeat Louisi- 



ana Tech (2-6) on its home floor. 

Senior guard Claire Coggins led 
the way for the Wildcats with 17 
points - all of them coming in the 
first half - and had five assists and 
four steals Junior guard Kimberly 
Oietz scored 15 points, and sopho- 
more guard Shalee Lehning added 
10 points, six assists and a team-high 
nine rebounds. 

Clinging to a 62-61 lead with 
seven seconds left, Coggins deflected 
a Louisiana Tech inbounds pass in- 
tended for senior Amber Mctoyer 
Dietz came away with the ball and 
was immediately fouled 



The Wildcats were not yet in the 
bonus, and four seconds later sopho- 
more forward Marlies Gipson was at 
the free-throw line for a one-and-one 
opportunity 

Gipson converted on both free- 
throw attempts to extend the Wild- 
cats' lead to three, and a desperation 
3-point shot by Louisiana Tech soph 
omore Eboni Mangum went wide 
at the buzzer. Gipson finished with 
10 points, six rebounds and three 
blocks. 

K-State had a 38-18 lead late in 
the first half and seemingly had con- 
trol of the game They shot 58 6 per- 



cent from the field and took a 43-27 
lead into halftime. 

But things turned ugly in the sec- 
ond half as the Wildcats shot just 29 2 
percent and got sloppy with the bas- 
ketball They finished with 29 turn- 
overs, some of which translated into 
easy Louisiana Tech baskets, helping 
the Lady Techsters narrow the gap. 

However, with less than four min- 
utes left in the game, Dietz made a 
3-point jump shot to give the Wild 
cats a 62-57 lead, helping her team 
escape with a tough road victory in a 
building where wins are often tough 
to come by 




FBC | Campbell named Defensive 
Player of the Year by Chronicle 

Sophomore defensive end Ian 
Campbell headlined a group of three 
Wildcats named to the Houston Chronicle's 
2006 All-Big 12 football teams Tuesday as he 
was tabbed the league's Defensive Player of 
the Year. 

Linebacker Brandon Archer also 
garnered first -team honors by the publica- 
tion, while punt returner Yamon Figurs was 
named to the second team. 

Campbell, a former walk-on who has 
blossomed into one of the nation's top 
rush ends, consistently ranked among the 
country's leaders in both sacks and tackles 
for losses during 2006. 

The Big 1 2's top tackier among defen- 
sive lineman with 60 stops, Campbell tied 
the K-State single-season record for sacks 
with 1 1 .5 on the year and heads into the 
bowl season ranked fifth nationally in that 
category. He aha led the Big 1 2 in tackles for 
losses with 16.5, a figure that ranks 19th in 
the country. 

Archer, K-State's leading tackier (or the 
third straight season, picked up his third 
consecutive second team all league designa- 
tion from the Kansas City Star a her ranking 
sixth in the Big 12 during the regular season 
with a career, single- season- besi 97 tackles. 

figurs, who was selected to the second 
team as a return specialist finished the 
season ranked second in the Big 12 and 16th 
nationally in punt returns after averaging 
1 2.2 yards on 20 attempts. 



GLF | Former K-State golfer fells a 
stroke short of earning tour and 

Aaron Watkins, a K-State letter winner 
from 2001 to 2004, came up one stroke 
short of earning a spot on the 2007 PGA 
Tour, as the final round of School was 
held Monday at the PGA West Stadium and 
Jack Nkklaus Tournament courses. 

Watkins finished the six -round, 1 0S- 
hole event at 7-under-par 42 S to tie for 
41st one stroke shy of the 8-under-par 424 
cut line of the top 30 spots and ties. 

However, with the tie for 41st, 
Watkins becomes fully exempt for the 2007 
nationwide tour, a developmental tour 
for the PGA Tour. The top 20 members on 
the nationwide money list each year are 
given memberships (or the PGA Tour the 
following year. 



Associated Press 

FBC | Missouri running back pleads 
to lesser charge in assault case 

COLUMBIA, Mo — M)ssouri running 
back Tony Temple pleaded guilty Tuesday to a 
reduced charge in a misdemeanor assault case 
stemming from a fight 
in a restaurant parking 
lot 

The junior tailback 
was sentenced to 18 
months of unsuper- 
vised probation and 20 
hours of community 
service after pleading 
guilty to disturbing, 
die peace. He also 
was ordered to not contact the victim. 

Temple initially faced misdemeanor 
assault charges for allegedly punching a 
Bennigan's worker in the face and mouth in 
a June dispute involving Temple's girlfriend, a 
former Missoun softball player who worked at 
the Columbia restaurant 

A Missouri football spokesman said he 
didn't expect Temple to face any additional 
disciplinary action. Coach Gary Pinfcel 
suspended Temple from the team for summer 
conditioning dnlls, but Temple returned to 
become the leading rusher for the Tigers (8-4). 



BBN | Carpenter signs 5-year 
$63.5 million deal with Cardinals 

LAKE BUENA VISTA. Fla. — The St Louis 
Cardinals announced a $63 5 million, five-year 
deal with 2005 NL Cy Young Award winner 
Chris Carpenter on Monday, locking him 
up through the 201 1 season. The deal also 
includes a club option for 2012 that would 
bring the total value to $77.5 million. 

Carpenter was 1 5-8 with a 3.09 ERA last 
season, finishing third in Cy Young balloting 
and helping the Cardinals win their firs! World 
Series title ■ 24 years. 

He was 3-1 with a 2.78 ERA In five 
postseason starts, mduding the clincher in the 
division series against the Padres and eight 
shutout innings in Game 3 of me World Senes 
against the Tigers 




Temple 



I 



Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2006 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 7 



Police advise for extra security 
during holiday excursions, trips 



By Jon** Hogg 

KANSK STATE COLLEGIAN 

Not everyone is interested 
in spreading Yuletide cheer, 
and petty bandits could be 
looking to pilfer a little or a lot 
of it from others 

Criminals often step up 
their game during the holidays, 
especially when a sizable por- 
tion of K-State students head 
home, potentially leaving resi- 
dences uninhabited for weeks 
at a time. 

"A lot of students in par- 
ticular leave the area around 
Christmas, and criminals 
know the students leave and 
don't take all their valuable 
stuff with them," said Capt 
John Doehling of the Riley 
County Police Department 

More problems can arise 
from the sudden influx of 
students moving out of apart- 



ments and especially the resi- 
dence halls, said Troy Lane, 
assistant director of the K- 
State Police Department 

"We see a spike in thefts 
each time this semester," he 
said. 

Students making trips to 
and from their cars often don't 
lock the doors, leaving them 
easy prey for a passersby. Al- 
ternately, students often fail 
to secure their rooms between 
trips, posing a potential dou- 
ble threat. 

Lane said this time of year 
often accompanies a rise in 
textbook thefts, as the unscru- 
pulous look to capitalize on 
book buy-backs. 

"Lock up behind yourself, 
or buddy -up with your neigh- 
bor," Lane said. "Pick up stuff, 
and take it with you." 

Additional problems come 
in the form of car burglaries, 



Doehling said. As holiday 
shopping enters its final days, 
hurried people rushing from 
store to store often leave re- 
cently purchased valuables 
in plain view. Even if doors 
are locked, the mechanics of 
smashing windows are often 
within the grasp of holiday 
opportunists. 

The solution? Out of sight, 
out of mind - simply placing 
things in the trunk often is an 
effective deterrent, Doehling 
said. 

If students are not moving 
but plan to leave for extended 
periods for the holidays, Lane 
said making sure windows 
and doors are locked is the 
best defense. 

"All you can really do is 
lock it up, and if somebody is 
determined to get in and get 
something, they're going to get 
it." he said. 




News Briefs 

Around the World 




NEW YORK CITY 1ST 
TO BAN TRANS FATS 

NEW YORK - New York 
on Tuesday became the first city 
in the nation to ban artery-clog- 
ging artificial trans fats at restau- 
rants, leading the charge to limit 
consumption of an ingredient 
linked to heart disease and used 
in everything from french fries 
to pizza dough to pancake mix. 

In a city where eating out b a 
common form of activity, either 
for fun or out of hectic necessi- 
ty, many New Yorkers said they 
were all for the ban as health 
concerns were more important 
than fears of Big Brother super- 
vising their stomachs. 

Health and nutrition groups 
say artificial trans fats clearly 
contribute to heart disease. 



776 3771 

if Textbook Buyback 
In Progress Now! 

X^lO.fltn. Rook l and (fo/o<«J 



Pregnancy 
Testing Center 



"Empowering wontftt 

with real options, real 

lu-lp, real hope. " 

pregnancy testing 
confidential service 

it day results 
for appointment 



Studies have shown they raise 
bad cholesterol and lower the 
good kind. Partially hydroge- 
nated vegetable oil, the main 
form of artificial trans fats, is 
used for frying and baking and 
turns up in a host of processed 
foods: cookies, pizza dough, 
crackers and pre- made blends 
like pancake mix. 

WORLD POWERS DO NOT 

REACH ACCORD ON U.N. 
RESOLUTION ON IRAN 

PARIS - Six world powers 
made "substantive progress" 
but failed to reach an accord 
on a U.N. resolution to punish 
Iran for defying U.N. demands 
to halt its nuclear program, the 
French Foreign Ministry said af- 
ter talks in Paris Tuesday 



Tehran made a new threat of 
retaliation if the powers opted 
for sanctions. 

"We made substantive prog- 
ress on the scope of the sanc- 
tions targeting proliferation-sen- 
sitive activities. There remain 
several outstanding issues, upon 
which we will reflect over the 
coming days," the French min- 
istry said in a statement "We 
are now close to a conclusion of 
this process." 

The talks brought together 
diplomats from the United 
States, Britain, China, France 
and Russia - the permanent 
members of the U.N. Security 
Council - as well as Germany 
and a representative of EU for 
eign policy chief Javier Solana. 
Source: The Associated Press 




9-3338 



[ Mon.Fri 9 a.m. t "p.m. ] 





Shots 



Bottles 



Send mm em! 




A beautiful tin of Sunflower Seed Brittle, Alms Mild Cheddar Cheese, 
Utingnri Summer Sausage, Louiaburg Applet Butter, lack's Snacks, 
•nd t jar of IBApitnes Honey in our market logo gift bo* ' 

Same u Kjoiaj Deluxe Box, without the tin of Sunflower Seed Brittle 

Alma Cbewe, Summer Sausage, Schlagie ■, Purple A White Popcorn, 
Wildcat Cookies A idly , and Cock a Doodle Brew Coffee! 

Add HO per box shipping continental USA 
CtH to Order! (by Dec. 1 5 for delivery by X-mw) 

776-9331a»t776-8111«wt 

E, HwtJ. » by fcpr-f or W ft 0m BU 



Stovtjn Doll | COLLEGIAN 

Zachary Russell, 5, gives a hug to a Santa Claus puppet played by Hailey Gillespie, graduate student in 
theater. Members of speech communication professor Sally Bailey's creative dramatics class performed 
a puppet show Tuesday afternoon at the Manhattan Public Library. 

Class writes, performs 
show for local children 



By irk Davis 

KANSAS STAT! COLLEGIAN 

Puppets danced Tuesday 
afternoon during a show for 
preschoolers and their par- 
ents in the Manhattan Pub- 
lic Library auditorium. 

The show was performed 
by members of Sally Bailey's 
creative dramatics class and 
was the final project for the 
year. Other units the class 
included storytelling, games 
and improvisation. 

"This is a great way for 
my students to get a taste 
of what performing is like." 
said Bailey, associate profes- 
sor of speech communica- 
tion, theater and dance. "It 
is not like stage performance 
though, since the perform- 
ers cannot make eye contact 
with the audience " 



The students, who repre- 
sent a variety of majors, cre- 
ated an entire show based 
on children's stories. 

Everything, including the 
puppets, were made by the 
students. 

There was only one per- 
formance of the show be- 
cause it was the group's final 
project. 

Nick Robinson, senior in 
theater, was among the stu- 
dents who helped with the 
event 

"1 really liked the experi- 
ence," Robinson said "It was 
a different type of perform- 
ing, and I think that I am go 
ing to do this some more" 

The students had five 
weeks to design a show, 
write the script and prepare 
for the performance. 

"I was a little nervous 



about the show, but once 
it started, I got more confi- 
dence," Meredith Holland. 
senior in women's studies, 
said. 

"1 played Petunia the 
goose in my show," she said 
"I had never done a puppet 
show before. It has always 
been stage performance," 

Jennifer Adams, chil- 
dren's services manager for 
the Manhattan Public Li- 
brary, said parents from the 
community called her to 
ask when the show will take 
place 

"The community really 
enjoys the shows, and we 
enjoy having them here," she 
said. 

"It gives the students 
a wonderful opportunity, 
and the kids really love the 
shows" 



Sell Your Textbooks 



For 




CASH! 




at the 

K-State Student Union Bookstore 

Textbook Department 

Buy Back Hours: 

Mon, Dec 11th -Thu Dec 14th 

8:00 am - 8:00 pm 

and 

Fri, Dec 1 5th: 

8:00am - 6:00pm 




*You don't need your receipt 

*lt doesn't matter where your 
books were purchased 

"Please bring a current photo ID 




• . * »* ■ 



Pages 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2006 



TATTOOS I Younger businesses more accepting 



Continued from Page 1 

you may be able to display 
those in different ways." 

Williams said she has seen 
a trend in young businesses 
regarding how accepting they 
arc about body art. 

"Those business people 
who are younger, hipper and 



don't pander to the communi- 
ty's elite, however that might 
be defined, arc much more 
likely to be progressive in their 
attitudes toward body art and 
piercings" 

For interviews of any kind, 
Keller said she suggests remov- 
ing any visible body piercings 
other than earrings and trying 



not to display tattoos 

"I think if that's really part 
of your identity, and you feel 
strongly that you should just be 
who you arc, that's great, but 
you may have to realize some 
organizations arc going to be 
more open to it than others," 
she said "That's a value judg- 
ment you just have to make" 



KEMP | District attorney says Appleby's intent was sex 



Continued from Page 1 

Sentencing was scheduled (or 
Dec. 26. 

On Monday, the jury 
watched a videotape of Ap- 
pleby telling Leawood detec- 
tives he had gone to pool to 
check it out as a potential cli- 
ent. He said he found Kemp 
attractive and tried to "hit 
on her," then "lost it" when 
she rebuffed his advance and 
swung at him 

"1 killed her," Appleby said 
on the tape "1 strangled her, 
I guess I don't know what I 
used There was something 
laying there" 

Defense lawyers startled 
the courtroom when they ac- 
knowledged in opening state 



ments last week that Appleby 
had killed Kemp but that the 
murder was not premeditat- 
ed. 

They contended he be- 
lieved Kemp was alive when 
he left her and that he should 
be convicted of a lesser charge 
than capital murder. 

But District Attorney Paul 
Morrison, who takes office 
next month as Kansas' new- 
ly elected attorney general, 
maintained that Appleby 
went into the pool's pump 
room intending to have sex 
with Kemp. After she fought 
with him, Morrison said, 
Appleby beat and strangled 
Kemp 

Morrison argued that un- 
der Kansas law, the capital 



murder charge applied be- 
cause the murder occurred 
during an attempted rape. 

In his closing argument 
Tuesday, Morrison said the 
murder was premeditated and 
Appleby intentionally killed 
Kemp when she rebuffed his 
sexual advances 

Kemp's father had waged 
a national publicity campaign 
to find his daughter's killer. 

Roger Kemp helped set up 
a $50,000 reward fund, got 
billboards put up around the 
Kansas City area seeking in- 
formation on his daughter's 
killer and bought advertise- 
ments in USA Today 

Her case also was the 
subject of "America's Most 
Wanted" segments 



Tainted Taco Bells used same 
food distributor, company says 



See a photo 
opportunity? 



/■~>K A N S A S STATE 

Collegian 




By Angel. DelliSanti 

THE ASSOCIATE PfllSS 

SOUTH PLA1NF1ELD, 
N.).- All 11 Taco Bells impli- 
cated in an E coli outbreak 
used the same food distribu- 
tor, the restaurant chain said 
Tuesday as health officials 
tried to pinpoint the source 
of the bacteria that sickened 
at least three dozen people. 

Nine people remain hos- 
pitalized in New Jersey and 
New York, including an 11- 
yearold boy in stable condi- 
tion with kidney damage. 

Taco Bell Corp., a subsid- 
iary of Yum! Brands Inc., said 
it had sanitized its nine closed 
restaurants. At least five - all 
in Long Island, N.Y. - had re- 
opened by Tuesday evening. 

"We have no indication 
what the source is," spokes- 
man Rob Poetsch said, "We're 
looking into all possibilities" 

The distributor. Texas- 
based McLane Co., said Taco 
Bell representatives and state 
and federal health inspectors 
toured the distribution center 
in Burlington, N.J., that sup- 
plied the eight Long Island 
restaurants and the three in 
New Jersey 

"It involves tracking your 
way back and trying to see if 
by process of elimination you 
can determine the root cause," 
said Bart McKay, a lawyer for 
McLane. 

He said McLane distrib- 
utes to all Taco Bells in New 
Jersey and the New York City 



area, but he had no estimate 
on how many that is. 

The case has underscored 
the risk of widespread out- 
breaks of food poisoning at 
fast-food chains. 

"Fast-food restaurants 
don't purchase ingredients 
down the street at the local 
farmers market. They pur- 
chase food nationally, pro- 
cess it nationally and ship 
it across the country," said 
Carol Tucker Foreman, head 
of the Food Policy Institute at 
the Consumer Federation of 
America. 

However, Taco Bell ships 
its bcef-and-bean fillings to 
restaurants pre-cooked and 
pre-seasoned to save money, 
and industry experts said that 
practice may be safer, because 
the food is handled by fewer 
people and is heated twice 
- once at the plant and once 
at the individual restaurants 

New Jersey health officials 
said their investigation would 
probably focus on produce. 
not just meal, because some 
of the 23 people who ate at 
New Jersey Taco Bells and 
were infected with E. coli 
were vegetarians. 

E. coli is found in the fe- 
ces of humans and livestock. 
Most E. coli infections are 
associated with undercooked 
meat. 

The bacteria also can be 
found on sprouts or leafy veg- 
etables such as spinach. The 
germs can be passed from per- 
son to person if they do not 



thoroughly wash their hands 
after using the bathroom. 

New Jersey's health com- 
missioner said the most re- 
cent case of E. coli was re- 
ported Nov. 29, so the danger 
of infection may have passed 

Two of the 11 restaurants 
implicated - both in New 
Jersey - were inspected and 
remained open. 

Also Tuesday, the Penn- 
sylvania Health Department 
said it was investigating an 
E, coli outbreak that sick- 
ened four people in suburban 
Philadelphia to determine if it 
was linked to the New York 
and New Jersey outbreak. 

Three of those who fell 
ill at the end of November 
had eaten at a Taco Bell, de- 
partment spokesman Troy 
Thompson said Two were 
hospitalized and released 

The nine Taco Bell restau- 
rants located in Montgom- 
ery County were voluntarily 
closing as a precaution, the 
Montgomery County Health 
Department said in a state 
ment. 

E. colt, or Escherichia coli, 
is a common and ordinarily 
harmless bacteria, but certain 
strains can cause abdominal 
cramps, fever, bloody diar- 
rhea, kidney failure, blind 
ness, paralysis, even death 

— Associated Pre h writers Nth 
Dcfilco in Trenton, N J., Nihal Tooii 
in New York, and Gillian Fliccut in 
Irvine, Calif., contributed to this 



HJknow^ 

how 



• • I 



January 2007 

December 27, 2006 - January 10, 2007 




have 




Time is running out Enroll today! To enroll and/or obtain an Intercession schedule with complete course descriptions and 
prerequisites, visit http //www dee ksu edu/ If you prefer, call (785) 532-5566 or 1-600-432-8222 or visit the Division of Continuing 
Education at 131 College Court Building, 1615 Anderson Ave., Manhattan, KS. 

Tuition for on-campus coursework will be $164 per undergraduate resident credit hour and S227 per graduate resident credit hour, 
plus 51 per day special and health fees A student services fee and/or materials fees may be required for some courses A $14 per 
credit hour fee is assessed for Engineering and Architecture courses. 



lor 



^x 



Course Title 

Agriculture 

Practicum in Bakery Technology 

Architecture, Planning, & Design 
Topics in Architectural Design Methods: 

The Expressive tine 
LEED for Professional Accreditation 
Beginning Airbrush 
Portfolio Design Studio 
Portfolio Design Studio 
Design Graphics and Visual Thinking 
Problems/Advanced Design Graphics/Visual Thinking 
Computer Applications in Planning and Design 

Arts a Sciences 

Understanding Islam 

Forensic Medicine and the Investigation of Death 

The History of the American Intelligence Community 

Sport and Exercise Personality 

Jazz in Kansas City and the Southwest 

From Metropolis to the Heartland- Immigrant 

Experiences in America 
Social Construction of Serial Murder 

Ethics in Drama Therapy 
Topics in Technical Theatre Scene Painting 
Women and Environment alism The Ecofeminrst 
Perspective 

Business 

Introduction to Total Quality Management 



Achieving Career Success 



Education 

Stress Management 

Stress Management tor Teachers. Counselors 

and Administrators 
Early Field Experience 



Course # 



GRSC 701 



ARCH 710 
ARCH 715 
IAPD406 
IAPD406 
IAPD830 
LAR31Q 
LAR741 
PLAN 630 



AMETH580 
ANTH684 
HIST 200 
KIN 592 
MUSIC 424 

SOCIO 500 
SOCIO 562 

THTRE 630 
THTOE711 

WOMST500 



MANGT300 
MANGT 497 



Ref# 



04100 



94107 
94106 
94138 
94137 
94139 
94109 
94110 
94150 



94105 
94103 
941(7 
94123 
94124 

94125 
94126 

941 28 

94130 



Credit Dates 



I 



1 UG/G 



3UG/G 
3 UG/G 
3UG 
3UG 
3G 
3UG 
3 UG/G 
1 2 UG/G 



3UG/Q 
3 UG/G 
3UG 
3 UG/G 
3UG 

3 UG/G 

3 UG/G 

3 UG/G 
3 UG/G 



I 

1/4-1/10 



12/27-1/10 
12/27-1/10 
12/27-1/10 
12/27-1/10 
12/27-1/10 
12727-1/10 
12/27-1/10 
1/3-1/10 

12/27-1/10 

12/27-1/9 

12/27-1/10 

12/27-1/10 

12/27-1/10 

12/27-1/10 



12/27-1/10 
12/27-1/10 



Times 



MTWUF 6 00 AM-4 30 PM 



"'■ 3U0 * ,M7 -'"° 



MTWUF 12 30 PM-4-15 PM 
MTWUF 12.00 PM-5 PM 
MTWUF 1:00 PM-4 45 PM 
MTWU F 9:00 AM- 1^45 PM ' 
MTWUF 9 00 AM-12 45 PM 
MTWUF 1 00 PM-5 00 PM 
MTWUF 1 00 PM-5,00 PM 
MTWUF 9 00 AM- 145 PM 

MTWUF 9 00 AM- 12 45 
MTWUFSa9;0QAM-500PM 
MTWUF frOOPM-10: 15 PM 
MTWUF 8:30 AM-12:30PM 
MTWUF 1 00 PM4:45PM 

MTWUF 9:00 AM- 1:00 PM 
MTWUF 1:00 PM-5:00 PM 
Sa 9 00 AM-5 00 PM 
MTWUF9 00AM-5:OOPM 
MTWUF 9 00 AM-tOO PM 

MTWUF 9:00 AM- 1:00 PM 





EDCEP 802 
■EC 230 



. 



MENU GUIDE 

in bod of the 

Campus Phone Book 

Me m Kerfrie 103 
Frt t %m.- 5 bvm. 



Engineering 

CAD m Fngineenng and Constn 
Introduction to LEED 
Introduction ID Information Technology 
Introduction to Microcomputer Spreadsheet 

Applications 
Introduction to Microcomputer Database Applcalions 
Topics in Construction Management Titt-Up Concrete 

Structure* in Construction Mangt 
introduction to Total Quality Management 

P(oblems/£ng and Teen Ha zwoper Training 

Human Ecology 

Understanding Death. Dying. Gnef and Lost 
Introduction to Marriage and Family Therapy 
Topics Pramanlal Education and Counseling 
Seminar in Long-Term Care Administration 



ARE 311 
ARE 720 

CIS 101 

CIS 102 
CIS 103 

CNS844 
DEN 300 

OEM J86 



94157 
94140 

94163 

94162 
94160 



94165 
94111 
94146 

94147 
94146 

94145 
94164 

94166 



1 UG 1/5-1/8 MF 5,00 PM- 10.00 PM 

Sa 1:00 PM-5 00 PM 
3 UG 12/27-1/10 MTWUF 8:15 AM-12 00 PM 



3 UG/G 12/27-1/10 MTWUF 330 PM-6 30 PM 

3 G 12/2M/10 MTWUF 3:30 PM-6 30 PM 

1UG 12/27 1/10 



2UG 12/27-1/10 MTWUF 8: 00 AM- 12 00 PM 

1 UG/G 1/3-1/10 MTWUF 1:00 PM-4 00 PM 
1UG 12/27-12/29 WUF 8O0AM-12 10 PM 

1UG 1/2-1*4 TWU8:0OAM.12:10PM 

1UG 1AM/10 MTW 8:00 AM-12: 10 PM 

2 UG/G 1/2-1/10 MTWUF 8:00 AM- 12 00 PM 
1UG 1/5-1/8 MF 5:00 PM- 10 00 PM 

Sa1:OOPM-5:O0PM 

3UG 1/2-1/30 TWUF8 0OAM-7 0QPM 



FSHS 300 


94167 


3UG 


12/27-1/10 


MTWUF 8: 30 AM- 12 30 PM 


FSHS 704 


94171 


3 UG/G 


12/27-1/10 


MTWUF 8 30 AM-12 15 PM 


FSHS 708 


94172 


3 UG/G 


12/27-1/10 


MTWUF 6:00 PM- 10:00 PM 


GERON 610 


94180 


3 UG/G 


12/28-1/10 


MTWUF 5:00 PM-900 PM 




www.dce.tksu.edu/intersession 



CLASSIFIEDS 



To place an advertisement call 



Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2006 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 9 



II I I ■_ I || || 







J S3 ■ J _■ _ ■ I 




LET'S RENT 



SUBLEASER NEEDED 
u soon m poMbtt. lint- 
versity Crossing at Col- 
lege and Kknbell, Two- 
bedroom, two bath Fur- 
nished apartment, 
washer.' dry** 1375/ 
month. 315-37 1-1429. 
SUBLEASER 



ADMISSIONS RE PRE 
8CHTATTVG Kansas Stat* 
University it recruiting tor 
al least on* and poaaJbty 
several position* of Adrnia- 



EARN ttOO ■ $3200 a 

month to drive brand new 
can with ada ptaowl on 
tham. www AdDrtv»T*am - 




817 KEARNEY. Two-bod 
room main floor 900 
square feet. Laundry hook- 
ups Lighted, paved park- 
ing Shared utilities NO 
PETS. Lease through 
July $600 785-776-8548, 



NOOQ Si 

Subleaser 



Advertise 

785-5J2-6555 



31 S KEARNEY. Four-Bed- 
room, two batnroom 
Short term lease avail- 
able Central air. Newly re- 
modeled. Washer/ dryer. 
Pets ok. Available Decem- 
ber' January. 
785-317-7713 . 

AVAILABLE SOON. Two- 
bedroom main floor of du- 
pteH Washer/ dryer. Six 
month lease On* Mock 
east ot Aggieville 
785-539-3672 



looking for a job? 

CHECK THE 

COLLEGIAN 

CLASSIFIEDS 





ONE-BEDROOM, 
block from campus, 
utilities paid 

785-537-4947 



ONE 
$500. 

Can 



BSA EXHIBIT AWcie 
Botwell painting and AUsa 
Enochs metal smithing 
and tawelry, with recep- 
tion to loHow Friday. De- 
cember 8, 5p.m. - 7p.m 
WiHard Hall, first foor 

LEARN TO FLYI K Stale 
Flying Club has live air- 
planes and lowest rates 
Call 785-776-17*4. www. 
kau.edu/kslc 




Lost and found ads can 
be placed free for three 
days. 




Housing. Real Estate 




Manhattan CITY Ordi- 
nance 4814 assure* ev- 
ery person equal opportu- 
nity In housing without dis- 
tinction on account ol 
race, sen, familial status, 
military status, disability, 
religion, age, color, na- 
tional origin or ancestry. 
Violations should be re- 
ported to the Director of 
Human Resource* at City 
Hall, <785)M7-2440. 

SUBLEASER NEEDED 
January t. $240 a month 
plus utilities Close to cam- 
pus/ AgglevlKe. Call 
785-313-1656 




MANHATTAN CITY Ordi- 
nance 4814 sssure* ev- 
ery person equal opportu- 
nity Inhoutlng without dle- 
ilnctlon on account of 
race. sex. familial status, 
military stilus, disability, 
religion, age, color, na- 
tional origin or anceatry. 
Violations should be re- 
ported to the Director ol 
Human Resource* at City 
Hall, (785)587 2440 

GREAT TWO-BED 

ROOM, close to campua, 
newly remodeled, off- 
street parking S650, avail- 
able December i, call 
785-380-8300. 

LAFl&E OfiiE-BEDROOM 
close to campus, Washer/ 
Dryer. Air Available Jan- 
uary 1. $500 
785-776-2 1 00 

uuw twd-Beb- 

ROOM, great open 
kitchen, close to campus 
ofl-street perking, laundry 
facility $720, available 
January, ca« 

7B5- 320-8300 

NEW THREE-BED- 
ROOM. two bath, three 
parking spaces condo. 
820 North Manhattan. 
Available January 2007 
$1350/ month 
816-926-0454. 

MottooU kJt 

No smoking or 
pets. Available January 
1st $485 a month, plus 
utilities 785-587-8356. 

ONE OR TWO-BED- 
ROOMS available now or 
January 1 Only a few left, 
$295 and up. Hurry! Cap- 
stone Management 
785-341-0686 

ONE-BEDROOM APART- 
MENT, 1017 Laramie 
$475/ month. No pels 
Available January. 

785-370-4038 wwwap- 
skanaaa.com 

ONEBEDROOM APART- 
MENT. 1212 Kearney 
across from campus avail- 
able after December 15th 
785-539-7981 . 

ONEBEDROOM. CLOSE 
to campus m newer com- 
plex. No pets. 
785-313-7473, 



ONEBEDROOM. THREE- 
BEDROOM, and studto. 
Three block* irom cam- 
pus Available January 1. 
785-776-6055 

STUDIO IN duplex, appli- 
ances, washer/ dryer 
Screened porch No pets 
Water and trash included 
$295 785-537-8420 

785-341-5346. 

TWO-BEDROOM APART- 
MENT above Kite's 
Flooring, amazing 
$890 available January 1. 
Hurry. won! last! 
785-341-9110 Leave 

message 

TWO BEDROOM APART- 
MENTS 813 More $600/ 
month, all utilities are in- 
cluded. 785-370-4038 
www. apskan sas . com . 

rvVO-BEDROOM AVAIL- 
ABLE lor January lo Au- 
gust. Pels ok. Dish- 
washer $575/ month. Cal 
785-341-2940 or 
785-537-0205 

TWO-BEDROOM BY City 
Park with oil -street park 
ing and laundry $600, 
available January, call 
785-320-8300. 

TWO-BEDROOM, ONE 
and one-half bath apart- 
ment In quiet neighbor- 
hood Available Jan 1 
1420 Beechwood Ter- 
race. $710/ month. 785- 
341-9698, rosswll- 
googlepagas com 

TWO-BEDROOM one 
and one -half bath, close 
lo campus, ofl-street park- 
ing $825. available Jan- 
uary, call 785-320-6300 

TWO-BEDROOM, ONE 
bath, short term possible. 
Spacious. CiCo Park 
area Appliances, central 
air Water/ trash paid. 
Deck, ofl-Streat parking. 
No pets Available Jan- 
uary $525 
785-537-8420. 
785-341 5346 

TWO-BEDROOM' ONE 
bath town house $85000, 
new construction Also 
Two-bedroom; two bath 
apartment near the mall, 
call Wildcat Property at 
785-537-2332 

UPSCALE ONEBED- 

ROOM. dose to campus, 
on-site laundry and fit- 
ness, gated parking. 
$700, available January, 
call 785-320-6300 



THREE- SEVEN-BED- 
ROOM houses near cam- 
pua lor next year. June/ 
August leases all have 
central air. full kitchens, 
and washer/ dryer. Call 
now lor best selection. 
785-341-1897 



TWO- 
HOUSE. 
uary 1, 
campus. 



785-539-1975 
785-313-4465 



BEDROOM 

Available Jan- 
2007 Close to 
No pets Call 



01 





oTF 



AVAILABLE SOON Two- 
bedroom main floor ot du- 
plex. Washer/ dryer Six 
month lease One block 
east of AggieviNe 
785-539-3672. 



NkSe THREE-BED- 

ROOM, one bath avail- 
able January 1st No pets. 
$880/ month. Yard, 
garage, close to campus 
Lots of storage. 

7 85-537 7354 

THREE, Pfilin. PlVt, TO bedroom 
PLUS BEDROOMS Look- halt t 
Ing for that perfect home 
to rent? Great selection 
and prices. Capstone 
Management 
785-341-0686 



A MALE roommate 
needed to share three- 
bedroom house One 
block from campua. 
Washer/ dryer $295 per 
month Available now 
through May 

785-336-1124 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
needed tor lour-bedroom 
house. $350/ month plus 
electricity. gas. SBC 
Oulet, nice house, major 
appliances Included 

785-587-9207. 
785-230-3008 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
needed immediately 

Clean newly remodeled 
three-bedroom, two bath 
house, garage available, 
washer/ dryer. Call 
785-820-7812 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted for three-bedroom 
house $300. utilities paid 
Call 7B5 -537-4947 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 
wanted to share large 
apartment. Two miles 
from campus. Available 
mid-December No Smok- 
ing/ pets $305 plus one- 
half unities Call 
402-525-7947 

FEMALE ROOMMATE: 
wanted who loves pels 
and is neat, quiet, and re- 
sponsible Rent $310/ 
month including utilities 
Private bath First month 
free with January start. 
Call 785-537-8807 lor de- 
tails 

FEMALE ROOMMATE(S) 
non-smoking, lo break, 
tiam. show horses, etc 
for rent. Prefer veterinar- 
ian, animal science ma- 
jors PO Box 1211, Man- 
hattan KS 66505 

FEMALE ROOMMATES 
needed for two bBdrooms 
In a four-bedroom, three- 
bath ranch with garage. 
$300/ month, one-lourth 
utilities, washer/ dryer, ap- 
pliances cable. No smok- 
ing No pets Available 
Jan 1st. 913-206-7780, 
913494-0862. 

RbypmiBLt huum- 

MATE wanted Quiet 
neighborhood two miles 
from campua. Washer/ 
dryer No pets $275/ 
month plus one-form utili- 
ties Kelly 785-565-9136. 

ROOMMATE NEEDED 
$325 per month, plus utili- 
ties Across street from 
campus, ofl-street park- 
ing. Available January 
2007- August 2007 
783-439-8926 

HOOMMATE WANTED 
lor a two-bedroom house. 
All appliances supplied 
Call 785-332-6152 ask tor 
Erica. 

SUBLET APARTMENT to 
August. University Cross- 
ing Won drinker, great 
roommate, as soon as 
passible 913-709-8434. 




FEMALE ROOMMATE 
January • July 
Big five bedroom duplex 
includes all appliances. 
Ofl-street parking Beauti- 
ful place, wonderful room- 
mates. Cal Courtney 
318-210-5975 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 
tour -bedroom, 2 bath 
house. $300/ month- ne- 
gotiable January- May. 
washer/ dryer, pato. walk- 
ing distance Furnished 
available 785-313-5229 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 
needed lo share four-bed- 
room, two bathroom, fully 
furnished apartment Avail- 
able January • Jury $315 
a month. 913-669 1685 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 
needed lor one-bedroom 
tor spring semester. 
Would be living with two 
females Close to Ag- 
gieville and campus, 
913-449-2473 

FEMALE SUBLEASES 
needed tor January 07 
through May. Three-Bed- 
room house. Nice, new, 
with washer and dryer. 
Rent $250 plus utilities, 
Call 785 221-2282 

FEMALE SUBLEASER 
needed for second 
semester. Four-pedroom 
house, washer/ dryer, 
dishwasher included. 

Close to campus and Ag- 
gievIHe 820-271-2956 

mm — sttbThker 

wanted to share two-bed- 
room house. Pets ok. 
$350/ month plus one-hall 
utilities Available Jan. - 
August CaH Ashley. 
816-215-7474. 

MALE SUBLEASER 
needed Spring 2007. 
close to campus. $300 
per month plus one-half 
utilities Please call Bran- 
don Baytess 
7BS-230-0512. 

MALE SUBLEASER 

needed, January - May 
$250 plus spilt utilities 
Four-Bedroom duplex, all 
appliances. One block 
from campus. 

785-584-7155. 

MALI SLJBLEASER 

wanted Close to campus, 
washer and dryer, four- 
bedroom, rent $370. 
Needed by January 
785-282-0899 

ONE-BEDROOM SUB- 
LEASE Rent reduced. 
Pets allowed Available 
December 20. 

316-817-5662 

ONEBEDROOM WITH a 
fun bath available in a two- 
bedroom apaflment. Fur- 
nished, cable No pets. 
Washer/ dryer Only $375/ 
month. tmmedlstelyl 

788-317-6313. 

QUIET ONEBEDROOM 
across from campus $500 
a month. Water, gas, and 
trash paid Available In 
January 785-317-2186 

ROOMMATES WANTED 
lor two-bedrooms, avail- 
able for spring semester 
Low rent, close to cam- 
pus. One-Nth utilities, 
washer/ dryer 

913-206-5289. 

SUBLEASE LARGE One- 
bedroom apartment. 
across Clatlln Road from 
Madatt dorms. $445/ 
month plus utilities, fur- 
nished, water/ trash/ park- 
ing paid, washer/ dryer, 
available January 8th to 
Jury 3 1st. Call 
617-853-9033 or email 
lttaoVksu.edu tor details 



NEEDED- 
January 1 One-bedroom 
apartment, Ctoe* to Ag- 
gievii* and campus. Rent 
$450/ month. Call 
913-909-2117. 

sublemeb mm 

As soon as posubts One- 
bedroom apartment avail- 
able now through July 31 . 
$460 p*r month, pet* *l- 
lowed Cal 316-288-9499 

sublease! waWTEd 

as soon as possible Nice 
house close to campus 
$350/ month (wining to 
deal) + one-frith utlWtes 
Call Brandl at 
785-448-0239 or email: 
bbuiiardffkau.edu. 

Subleased WaWBd 

One-bedroom one bath In 
two-bedroom two bath 
apartment $380 per 
month, turn/shad Avail- 
able January 1 . 
785-479-1235 or II- 
s3355i9ksu edu. 

SUBLEASER WANTED lo 
share two-bedroom 

house Clean, quiet neigh- 
borhood. Washer/ dryer, 
ofl-street parking. $400/ 
month, utilities Included 
913458-1411 

imam mho 

Ctoea to campua washer/ 
dryer Included $285/ 
month one-lourth utilities. 
Pets ok Call 

785-275-1913 

SLIBLEASER 

Located across from Ag- 
gieville and campus Avail- 
able January 2007 to Au- 
gust Rant negotiable 
Call Chris at 

785-527-3259 

bUULLAkLHi. NfcbUtu 
for January. Two-bed- 
room apartment dose to 
Aggieville and campus 
$400 plus utilities. CaH 
818-668-9223 or 

913-709-8615 

NLhULl) 



SHBcWsTHs" 

for two-bedrooms In a 

four-bedroom house 

$325 * month 

620-333-3675 

iwwtt wuums. avnim 

for sublease In three-bed- 
room, on* bath for Spring 
semester On* block from 
Aggieville 91 7 Moro. 
$330/ 
785-317-1263 

ItrlWnWfJIfS 



These Individuals are re- 
sponsible tor the develop- 
ment and implementation 
ot an effective student re- 
cruitment program within 
a specific geographic re- 
gion The major responsi- 
bilities Include: Coordinat- 
ing strategy and resource 
people for the region, serv- 
ing as the primary recruit- 
ment representative, de- 
veloping and maintaining 
service relationships with 
high school* and commu- 
nity coteges. attending 
major community events; 
and coonJnallng efforts 
lor the region with K State 
faculty and staff Queirnca- 
ttons include a recent K- 
State bachelors degree: 
familiarity and excitement 
lor K-State: demonstrated 
student involvement/ lead- 
ership sHts In student 
groups and organized liv- 
ing, (bong communication 
skills (oral/ written); strong 
social skills lor a variety ol 
situations; ability to work 
independently: overall 
high energy level and en- 
thusiasm, willingness to 
travel extensively, and a 
valid dnver's ttoense. At 
least one successful can- 
didate should have native 
or near- native Spanish 
language proficiency. Po- 
sition will start July 2. 
2007. and pay $29,000 tor 
12 months. Candidate 
should send a letter ot ap- 
plication, resume, tran- 
B BIJ T Eb" scnpt(s). and names and 
' phone numbers of three 
references to : Search 
Committee . New Student 
Services, Kansas Stats 
University, 122 Anderson 
Hall. Manhattan. KS 
66506 Application dead- 
line Is January 19,2007 
Kansas State university Is 
an Equal Opportunity Em- 
ployer and actively seeks 
diversity among its em- 
ployees Paid tor by 
Kansas State University 

OT 



PROGRAMMER CIVIC- 
PLUS I* the nation* lead- 
ing provider ol dty, county 
and school website*. Ful 
com - tjm* position In Martha!- 

Earn chrisTmAS cash! «■"■ **"°*°" *L2 

up to $20/ hour hanging JSJSCJ"! ™r%l 
door bag*. Work one houl tu6a *■ •** "•"* 



or more Big Brain Market- 
ing 785-539-3576 

FIRST WAtjAqEUEnT 

has a pan-time Isaatnrj 
agent position available 
tor a busy apartment com- 
munity Qualified appli- 
cants must have reliable 
transportation, a wtlkng- 
ness to work a varied 
schedule It is required to 
be able to work full time 
from July 23rd through Au- 
gu*t 8th for apartment 
turnover. Please apply at 
our Chase Manhattan 
Apartment location, 1409 
Chase Place, (comer of 
College and Clallin.) No 
phone calls please Eqiil 
Opportunity Employer 

qrapThIc" — BEsTSReTT 

CivicPlus is the nations 
leading provider ol dry, 
county and school web- 
sites Both full-time and 
work-at-home (contract) 



BaOTeWINU! WOO a 

day potential. No experi- 
ence necessary. Training 
provided. Call 

1-800-965-6520 a*! 144. 

CHURCH SECRETARY 
needed part-time starting 
in January Duties include 
word processing, making 



phones. To apply 
785-539-4079 



Call 



put 

In nice four-bed- 
apartment Big 
bar, deck. $250/ 
fun atmosphere 

January 1. Cal 

913-909-2278 



ABLE 
room 
screen 




THE COLLEGIAN cannot 
verify the financial poten- 
tial ot advertisement* In 
the Employment/Career 
classification Readers 
are advised to approach 
any *uch bualnaaa oppor- 
tunity with ree 
■onable cau- 
tion. The Collegian urges 
our reader * to contact the 
Better Business Bureau, 
501 SE Jefferson. 
Topeka, KS 66607-11*0 
(785)232- 0454. 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSIS- 
TANT Join our proles- 
stonal team as we intro- 
duce CivicPlus E- Govern- 
ment Innovations to Cities 
and Countries across In* 
US. This challenging posi- 
tion requires the ability to 
handle multiple lasks and 
priorities while maintain- 
ing a positive and ener- 
getic attitude $12/ hour, 
Ful-tlme onfy, opportuni- 
ties tor advancement. E- 
mail resume ir^ Microsoft 
Word or Tent format to: 
kibs@clvicplui.com 



COOK NEEDED st Weity 
Community Care Home 
Competitive wage, flexible 
scheduling. Contact 
Nancy, Highway 99 and 
Mam Westmoreland. 
785-457-2801 

CREATIVE DIRECTOR 
CivicPlus is the nations 
leading provider of City, 
County, and Schoot web- 
sites This is a fuH-hm*. 
Manhattan baaed posi- 
tion. You wll be In charge 
of directing the creative 
process, including brain- 
storming with staff, meet- 
ing with customers and 
providing the creative vi- 
sion necessary to give our 
customers outstanding 
and award winning web- 
sties Salary commensu- 
rate with experience Ben- 
efits include health, den- 
tal, paid holidays, paid va- 
cation and 401 K match- 
ing Ems! resume in Mi- 
crosoft Word or text tor- 
mat to job*®c*vicpiuB - 
com, include cover letter 
explaining your capabili- 
ties 

EARN $2500+ monthly 
and more to type simple 
ads online www.dataen- 
trytypers.com 



Full-time benefits include 
health, dental, paid holi- 
days, paid vacation and 
401 (k) matching Email 
resume and design sam- 
ples lo |0bs a 1 avicpiiis.com 

RTRfiyI BaTtime 

dishwasher needed. 

Shifts 10am - 3pm on 
Mon-Wed-Frt and/ or 
Tues-Thurs Soma night 
and/ or weekend availabil- 
ity. Apply in person at 418 
PoynB Ave Good Pay 

KANSAS WHEAf is seek 
ing a pan-time Records In- 
tern Requires knowledge 
of Microsoft Access Ex- 
cellent resume builder! 
Send resume to dpeter- 
aonltkswheat.com or 

Kansas Wheat, 217 South- 
wind Place. Manhattan, 
KS 68503, by December 
11, 2008. Equal Opportu- 
nity Employer. 

MYsTErY sWPEfls 

Earn up to $150. Experi- 
ence not required. Under- 
cover shoppers needed to 
judge retail *nd dining es- 
tablishments Cal 
800-722-4791 

METWUBk IbUMNIfJlAU 

Due to our recent expan- 
sion. Networks Plus ha* a 
new opening tor a tulF 
lime Computer Network 
Technician in Manhattan. 
Positive attitude, profes- 
sionalism, strong work 
ethic and one or more 
years ol computer support 
experience or equivalent 
training is required. E-mail 
resume to jobsOnefwork- 
splus.com In Microsoft 
Word or Text format. 
Equal Opportunity Em- 
ployer 

PART-TIME Furniture De- 
Irvery Positions: Flexible 
work schedule, great pay 
Stop by A Full House, 601 
S. 58i Street, 
765-537-9088 

PART-TIME PERSONAL 
care attendant needed for 
a 19 year ok) female 
Wishing to attend Kansas 
State this January Duties 
would include assisting 
dressing In the morning 
and evenings. If inter- 
ested call 620-375-2200 



dental, paid hokdays. paid 
vacation and 401 (ki 
matching. Email resume 
In Microsoft Word or text 
format to k)bs#clvfcplus.- 
com. 

SALES ASSOCIATE Pro- 
vide customer service in 
the Art/ Technology de- 
partment Price and stock 
merchandise, ability to lift 
40 t»., climb ladders and 
operate cutting equip- 
ment. Position will also 
provide sale* and servtc* 
of eel phone plans and 
computers/ software. Pref- 
erence WW be given to 
candidates with back- 
ground or experience in 
art techniques/ supplies, 
archaectur* or engineer- 
Ing. Hour*: Saturday 2pm- 
8p.m. and Sunday 11a.m. - 
- 5pm Pick up applica- 
tion at Vamsy'i Book 
Store. 

SO LirJ* sALooN How 
hiring waitress** and bar- 
tenders Apply In person. 
1130 Moro, Manhattan. 
KS 

TEachErs: SCbsTT 

TUTE Teachers. $75/ day. 
please apply to Becky 
Puttt, bpulti*u*d378 org 
at USD 378 Riley County 
785-485-4000. 

TELEPHONY TECHNi 
CIAN The Phone Connec- 
tion Is * faat growing 
voice networking (VOIP) 
company m need of Tele- 
phony Technicians in 
Sauna. Manhattan, 

Topeka and Kansas City, 
Positive attitude, profes- 
sionalism, strong work 
ethic and one or mora 
years of telephone or com- 
puter network support ex- 
perience or equivalent 
training is required Bene- 
fits include Health. Dental, 
Paid Holidays, Paid Vaca- 
tion. Paid Training and 401 - 
(k) matching. E-mai re- 
sume to (obs®tpeks com 
in Microsoft Word or Text 



RETIRING FACULTY sal- 
ing low mileage Mitsubishi 
2000 Mkage excellent 
condttton 38,800 mtlel 
Manual. air -condWonor, 
stereo, MM 

785-532-7176 office, 

785-776-9505 
7maraocOksu edu 




(1 SPRING Break Web- 
site I Low Prices Guaran- 
teed Group discounts for 
6+ Book 20 people, get 3 
free tnpsl www.Spring- 
Breakdlacounts.com or 
800 838 8202. 

DON'T MISS out* Spring 
Break 1007 is approach 
Ing and STB Is offering 
specials to this year's 
hottest destinations' Cal 
lor saving* 

1-800-848-4849 or visit 
wwwststrivel.com. 



Got old 
stuff? 



«TW 



RID 



WEB DESIGNER. Award 
winning advertising 

agency, Imagemakers, 
seekt futWime web devel- 
oper/ web designer Some 
training provided Apply at 
www. wamegowork .com . 




in the 

Kansas State 
Collegian 

103 Keriiie 
532-6555 



Open M.ii ki't 



FUTON FRAME- Do you 
have a good futon frame 
you need to get rid Of? 
Give me ■ call, I 
just buy It 785-556-0852 





Automobiles 




785-532-6555 



1990 CHEVY Blaier 
LOTS ol recant work, runs 
great I $1500 or Best Offer 
785-228-1620 

FOR SALE Ford Taurus 
2004. excellent condition 
Asking price $7,500 or 
best offer 785-313-6366 



Advertise in 
the Classifieds 

01 




Mill IIIKIM.I ki U 
IUOI Ol VI IttNS 



Our Crew Members enjoy: 

UP TO J 1 0.00 TO START 

Advancement & Training 

Medical Insurance 

Meal Discounts 

401{k) Plan 

Closing Sniff Supervisors - $7.00 to $10.00 

Daytime Cashiers - $6.00 to $8.00 

Late Nighl - $6.00 lo $7.50 



jit ti Full Time & P^ i T'™ Positions Available 




Help Wanted 
Oection 



Flexible Schedule 

EOE / Drug Free Workplace 



1837 



THREE-BEOROOM du- 
plex, northwest of sta- 
dium No smoking, drlnk- 
inq, or pels 785-539-1554 
1HHEE-BEDROOM 
HOUSE, one block Irom 
campus. Washer/ dryer, 
dishwasher, central air. 
Available January 1 $295 
p Br bedroom. 

786-336-1022 



FAIRCHILD. Two- 
one-and-one- 
washer/ dryer 
No pets. No smoking, 
$300 plus uMttles Jan- 
uary May lease 
512-748-9330 

TWO-BEDROOM ONE 
bath. $276 each, plus uni- 
ties One block from cam- 
pus Need two spnng sub- 
leasers Call 
620-874-5900 ask tor 
Bryan Armendariz 

A FEMALE Subleaser 
needed tor six- bedroom 
house Alt bins included in 
rant. $328 per month. Call 
Lrndsey 620-242-6451 



AUBURN WASHBURN 
USD 437, TOPEKA, KS 

has openings starting 1/3/07: 

•Math- Secondary 
•Lang Arts- Gr. 7& 8 
•Part-time Lit. Coach -El em 

•Art Elem 

Applications available on line at 

www.usd437.itet or call Debbi 



Williams 5928 SW 53rd St. 
Topeka, KS 66610 
785-339-4037 




OYwBMrr^ateintteMrfnhattaTi&^ 




AlcCullough 

Det/elopment 

mdiproperties.com • 785.776.3804 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Bad behavior 
101 



"Prank University: The Ultimate 
Guide to College's Greatest Tradition' 

REPORT CARD 



Book design: A 
Content: B+ 
Illustrations: A+ 
Relates to KSU Students: A- 
Re-read Value: B- 
Overall: A 

Book review by ieremy Roberts 



When engaging in pulling of pranks, 
stay away from point of no return 



The tag tine for John Austin's 
"Prank University: The Ultimate 
Guide to College's Greatest Tradition 
is, "Why show compassion to your 
roommates when you can terrorize 
them to the point of insanity?" 

The tag line holds true throughout 
this book. "Prank University," by toy 
designer and first-time author Austin, 
details 100 pranks aimed at college 
students. 

They never get old with classics 
like the flaming bag of dog feces, and 
creative, new ideas like the sticky 
shower, which involves Kool-Aid in 
the shower head, and plastic forking, 
which includes the placement of 600 
plastic forks in your victim's lawn. 

Not only are the ideas witty, but 
the descriptions also are written in a 
way that makes them easy to read and 
entertaining. Each prank description 
is only about a paragraph long and is 
accompanied with equally entertain- 
ing illustrations. 1 was impressed that 
the author not only wrote the book 
but also illustrated it- 
Most drawings of the pranks are 
done so well you don't even have 
to know how to read to pull off the 
prank yourself, which is perfect for the 
average college student 

Since the book is aimed at college 
students, it makes sense almost every 
prank in the book is cheap or free. 
There is a symbol system in place with 
each prank to scale its difficulty, price 
range, when it should be done and if it 
is too good not to videotape. 

My only criticism is the severity of 
some pranks. While the book warns 
in its descriptions that things could 
go badly for the prankster, it doesn't 
consider the damages many of these 
pranks can cause to the victim and, if 
caught, the perpetrator's wallet 



To redd *bout the 10 greatest college pranks, 
visit the Collegian Web site at www.kaattcol- 
Jrgton.com, 

Pranks like wrapping a car in 
plastic wrap are common and taken 
in good humor, but placing bologna 
slices all over a car to be boiled by the 
morning sun can damage the paint 
and make the car look like a cheetah. 

] don't think suggesting you change 
the peep hole in a girl's dorm room to 
look into the room so you can get, as 
the book calls it, a free show, is such 
a good idea. Welcome to, as the book 
states, "Bad Behavior 101" 

Some of the pranks are downright, 
morally wrong. For example, one 
prank involves going into a dorm 
laundry room when no one is there 
and placing a cup of bleach in each 
machine so that all the people that do 
their laundry shortly thereafter wilt 
have all their colored clothing perma- 
nently color-altered 

Many of these pranks aren't meant 
for your friends or roommates unless 
you want to tick them off to the point 
of no return. While it could be funny 
to switch out your roommate's copy of 
"Forrest Gump" with the porno film 
"Forrest Hump," he might not be as 
forgiving if you shave off his eyebrows. 
The book warns revenge most likely 
wilt be sought and advises hiding your 
copy of the book in that situation. 

If you ever get tired of placing 
alternative personal ads in the news- 
paper for your friend or placing pom 
as a screensaver on his computer, you 
always can wait for him to pass out 
and pull the 98 other pranks waiting 
for you in "Prank University." 

Check out the www.prankuniversi- 
ty.com for prank videos, pranks rated 
by users and tips on the latest pranks. 



Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2006 

'Yes Men' 
Strike Again 



By Eric Brown 

KANSAS STATE COtliOAN 

To the audience members gathered 
at the Pontchartrain Center in Kenner, 
La., a speaker introduced himself as 
Rene Oswin, assistant deputy secretary 
for the US. Department of Housing 
and Urban Development, or HUD. 

At an Aug. 28 meeting, a group of 
about 1,000 builders and contractors 
congregated to listen to a speech aimed 
toward HUD reversal policies in the 
rebuilding of the Katrina destruction. 
During the lecture, Oswin said the fed- 
eral government is planning to spend 
$180 million to fund public -health clin- 
ics for every housing development. The 
speech also featured a promise from 
Wal-Mart to withdraw its store from a 
low-income housing area so it could be 
replaced by local businesses. 

There were a few problems, howev- 
er. Nobody at HUD had ever heard of 
Rene Oswin, and all the statements he 
made in the speech were entirety false, 

The lecture by "Oswin" was noth- 
ing but a hoax, and everyone fell for 
it, including Louisiana Gov. Kathleen 
Blanco and New Orleans Mayor Ray 
Nagin, who both personally thanked 
the imposter before the lectern. 

William Loiry, president of meeting 
sponsor Equity International, admitted 
to CNN that he too was duped. 

In another CNN interview. Donna 
White, HUD spokesperson, described 
the prank as sick, twisted and not fun- 
ny. She also said HUD was trying to 
track the perpetrators down. 

So who pulled off such a remarkable 
prank? It was none other than The Yes 
Men, a group of activists who practice 
what they call identity correction. 

The group has created quite a name 
for itself in recent years, pranking the 
public with impersonations of the 
world's most powerful criminals and 
businessmen at conferences, on the 
Internet and on television. Its method 
of choice often is satire, in which the 
group's members pose as corporate or 
government spokespeople. Among the 
Yes Men's victims are The World Trade 
Organization, McDonald's and Dow 
Chemical. Their antics have resulted in 
false news reports of the demise of the 
WTO and Dow Chemical paying for a 
Union Carbide cleanup 

In recent years, the group's two lead- 
ing members have been known only by 
a number of aliases. These men go by 
Mike Bonanno and Andy Bichlbaum, 
which are names featured in their most 
recent film, 'The Yes Men.™ Along with 
their film, the Yes Men have published 
a book titled, "The Yes Men: The True 
Story of the End of the World Trade 
Organization." Both of these document 
the group's political pranks. 

The Yes Men said they plan to use 
their newfound authority to express the 
idea that corporations and governmen- 
tal organizations often act in dehuman- 
izing ways toward the public 

For more information about The 
Yes Men, visit wwui.theyesmen.org. 




BUTTERED I Sacred Footwear 



No, mommy! I want the 
Never insult P lnk tut S l 




Wmmmmm 



GAMEDAY 



Is a bright future in the stars? 

The Wildcats will return 15 starters 
next season, including freshmen 
at quarterback and running back. 

See story Page 8 



•- 



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"K _' ■ 



!••: 



imm 



m-M 



If) |»y | Ifllly I ilWtl'IMt- 



Best of Off the Field Page 2 1 Who is Rutgers? Page 3 | Ron Prince Pages 4-5 1 Memorable moments Page 6 1 Injuries Page 7 



Jf 



1 



1 



Page 2 



GAMEDAY 



Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2006 




Player to watch 

Rutgers running back Rayrndl Rice 
is li Kirth in the nation averaging 1 35.3 
yards rushing per game He is lied for 
second in the country with Crush- 
ing touchdowns, and averages 5.2 
yards per carry 



Texas Bowl 

K-State (7-5) vs. No. 16 Rutgers (10-2) 

7 p.m. Dec. 28 

History: First meeting 

TV/Radio: NFL Network/K-State Sports Network 



Player to watch 

k st jit senior linebacker Brandon 
Archer will be among 21) Wildcats 

playing in their final collegiate game. 
He is currently hed for ?9<h m the 

country in total tackles per game with 
an average of H Off 




tffch 



e Field 

The best of 2006 



By Scott Girard 
IHMIIIIIIHIIIIlim 

Throughout this football season, I have had the privilege of asking sometimes interesting some 
times useless questions for the weekly off-the-field session. 

While asking these questions, f did get the occasional guffaw 
or "Wltat in the world are you talking about," so I usually tried 
to isolate myself and the player from the rest of the media. The 
players were much more open, and / felt less awkward ask 
ing about their favorite nicknames away from a formal press 
conference 

Without further ado, here are the best off-the-field ques 
tions and answers of this football season 

THOMAS CLAYTON 

Q. First of all, how do you gel so buff and muscular? 

A. You can ask a lot of people at (Peters Recreation Complex) 

there every day After practice, I probably spend about two hours at the 

Rec, eat well and then go to sleep. It comes down to working hard, eating 

well and getting good sleep. 

MARCUS PERRY 

Q. A few weeks ago you were quoted as saying one of your goals on special learns 
was lo make people bleed. How many people have you actually made bleed? 
A. You can take that any way. Making them bleed can mean turning their head and 
making them shy away from me. It can mean looking a kid in the eyes and going 
down and hit him, and he backs off or you knock the crap out of him. It may mean 
making somebo